kinetic

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Art

Artist Zimoun Creates a Roiling Ocean of Packaging Peanuts inside the Windows of an Art Museum

April 23, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Swiss artist Zimoun (previously) just unveiled a large installation inside the windows of the Museo d’Arte di Lugano in Switzerland. Titled 36 Ventilators, 4.7m3 Packing Chips, the kinetic artwork relies on large fans that perpetually blow clouds of packaging peanuts against the museum’s broad windowframes. At night the effect is especially eye-popping as it appears the entire space is filled with a turbulent white sea. Via bitforms gallery:

Using simple and functional components, Zimoun builds architecturally-minded platforms of sound. Exploring mechanical rhythm and flow in prepared systems, his installations incorporate commonplace industrial objects. In an obsessive display of curiously collected material, these works articulate a tension between the orderly patterns of Modernism and the chaotic forces of life. Carrying an emotional depth, the acoustic hum of natural phenomena blends effortlessly with electric reverberation in Zimoun’s minimalist constructions.

Another recent Zimoun piece is an installation at Orbital Garden in Bern using packaging paper and motors that similarly creates a water-like effect. (via Creative Applications which just launched a new print magazine, HOLO)

 

 



Art Design

A Hand-Cranked Automaton That Mimics the Effect of a Raindrop Hitting Water

March 3, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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This little wood automaton is meant to mimic the effect of a water drop hitting a body of water, all using concentric rings cut from wood that are manipulated by a hand crank. The piece was created by UK-based designer Dean O’Callaghan, inspired by the work of Reuben Margolin (most likely his round wave sculpture). (via The Automata Blog)

 

 



Art Design

Ingenious Door Opens and Closes Like Folded Paper

February 10, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Like the design of functional objects such as chairs or tables, it would seem new ideas for the humble door would be completely exhausted, and then along comes Austrian artist Klemens Torggler. This 4-panel entryway called the Evolution Door opens and closes in a surprisingly elegant way at the slightest touch, folding in on itself like pieces of paper. Torggler calls this system a “flip panel door” (Drehplattentür), and it’s almost more of a kinetic sculpture than functional door, but I would be happy to have one in every room of my house. And for those of you who envision a crushed finger or hands, he’s already solved that problem.

Currently the door is meant as a prototype, an extension of his artistic practice where Vienna-based Torggler has been creating similar kinetic doors for many years, several of which are available through Artelier Contemporary. (via hajohinta, nsfw)

 

 



Art Dance

Emptied Gestures: Physical Movement Translated into Symmetrical Charcoal Drawings by Heather Hansen

January 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Bryan Tarnowski

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

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Photo by Spencer Hansen at Ochi Gallery

Splayed across a giant paper canvas with pieces of charcoal firmly grasped in each hand, Heather Hansen begins a grueling physical routine atop a sizeable paper canvas. Her body contorts into carefully choreographed gestures as her writing implements grate across the floor, the long trails resulting in a permanent recording of her physical movements. Part dance and part performance art, the kinetic drawings are a way for Hansen to merge her love for visual art and dance into a unified artform. The final symmetrical patterns that emerge in each pieces are reminiscent of a Rorschach test, or perhaps cycles found in nature.

Hansen most recently had a group exhibition, The Value of a Line, at Ochi Gallery in Ketchum, Idaho which runs through March 31, 2014. All photography above courtesy the artist by Spencer Hansen and Bryan Tarnowski. (via iGNANT, My Modern Met)

 

 



Amazing Craft Documentary

Man Spends 40 Years Building Giant Kinetic Carnival Rides to Advertise Family Restaurant in Italy

October 14, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

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Courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià

On June 15, 1969 in Battaglia, Italy a man named Bruno bought a few jugs of wine, some sausages and a few other items and set up a tiny food stand underneath a tree to see if anyone would show up. By the end of the day he had sold almost everything and the family restaurant, Ai Pioppi, was born. The next month he had a chance encounter with a blacksmith who didn’t have time to make a few hooks for some chains. Bruno decided he would learn to weld himself and enjoyed it so much he began to dream up small rides he could build to entice new customers to Ai Pioppi. It turned out to be brilliantly successful.

Now forty years later, the forest around the restaurant is packed with swings, multi-story slides, seesaws, gyroscopes, tilt-a-whirls, and bizarre kinetic roller-coasters for adults and children. In this artfully filmed 10-minute documentary by a team over at Fabrica, we get the chance to meet Bruno, see many of his rides in action, and learn a bit about his philosophy on existence and death.

For this post I also included a few photos courtesy Oriol Ferrer Mesià who visited Ai Pioppi in 2011 with several friends. You can see many more shots here and here.

The next time I’m in Italy I think this is at the top of my list.

 

 



Art

Full Turn: 3D Light Sculptures Created from Rotating Flat Screen Monitors at High Speed

September 22, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Full Turn is a kinetic light sculpture by Benjamin Muzzin created as a diploma project for his bachelor degree at ECAL. The piece was constructed from two flat screen monitors placed back-to-back and spun at extremely high speed resulting in three-dimensional light forms that hover in thin air. Of the work he says:

With this project I wanted to explore the notion of the third dimension, with the desire to try to get out of the usual frame of a flat screen. For this, my work mainly consisted in exploring and experimenting a different device for displaying images, trying to give animations volume in space. The resulting machine works with the rotation of two screens placed back to back, creating a three-dimensional animated sequence that can be seen at 360 degrees. Due to the persistence of vision, the shapes that appear on the screen turn into kinetic light sculptures.

Music by Montgomery Clunk. (via Prosthetic Knowledge, Creative Applications)