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Art

Delicate 'Knit' Glass Sculptures by Carol Milne

November 10, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Seattle-based artist Carol Milne (previously) fabricates flowing glass sculptures that mimic the delicate patterns of knit yarn. Contrary to the assumption that Milne has super-human ability to knit strands of molten glass by hand, the artist instead devised a somewhat complicated process that involves wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting. She discusses her techinques in detail in this video from Heather DiPietro. Milne also offers a PDF and a book about producing her glass work through the FAQ on her website.

Over the last year Milne’s artwork has appeared in the 9th Cheongju International Craft Competition, in the Creative Knitting show at the La Conner Quilt & Textile Museum, and at the Lake Oswego Festival of the Arts. You can see more of her recent work at Morgan Contemporary Glass Gallery in Pittsburgh.

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Craft Food Photography

Knit Wool Meals and Edibles by Jessica Dance Look Good Enough to Eat

October 22, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Photo by David Sykes

Art director and prop stylist Jessica Dance (previously) has collaborated again with food photographer David Sykes to bring us another tasty spread of knit dishes and other edibles. Dance makes all of the objects at home using 100% lambswool on a domestic knitting machine. All of the shots here (except the cheese spread) were for the comfort food issue of the latest edition of Stylist.

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Photo by David Sykes

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Photo by David Sykes

 

 



Craft

Cruelty-Free Knit Anatomy Specimens by Emily Stoneking

October 5, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Vermont-based knitter Emily Stoneking runs an anatomical knitting brand called aKNITomy where she transforms fluffy skeins of yarn into the anatomical details of rats, frogs, people, and other creatures. Stoneking—who is admittedly not a scientist—likes to approximate the form and style seen in most anatomical illustrations with clear colors and distinct forms that may not be 100% accurate but are fun to look at nonetheless.

The specimens are available as both completed pieces and downloadable patterns, so you can ditch the formaldehyde and get a PDF knitting guide. (via IFLScience)

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Craft Design

'Chunky Knits' by Anna Mo Incorporate Enormous Stitches to Comfortably Engulf the Body

June 12, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Anna Mo‘s chunky knits are not shy about their pattern, the soft form of her objects forcing the wearer to observe the pieces in all of their magnified glory. To knit these mammoth material works the Ukraine-based Mo not only uses extremely thick sections of wool, but also XXL needles to produce her three-inch-thick stitches. In addition to her wearable works, Mo also sells the yarn that she uses to produce the pieces (100% Australian merino wool) as well as oversized knitting needles so you can produce your own chunky sweaters and blankets.

Mo learned to knit at an early age, continuing the hobby into adulthood as a side project in addition to her work as a designer. Mo uses the tactile nature of knitting to balance her hours in front of the computer, allowing her hands to get as much exercise as her brain. For more images of Mo’s snuggly knits visit her Instagram. (via Beautiful/Decay and ĪGNANT)

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Art

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass

October 15, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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When first contemplating these glass sculptures by Seattle-based artist Carol Milne, your imagination runs wild trying to figure out how she does it. Glass has a melting point of around 1,500°F (815°C), so how could it possibly manipulated into neatly organized yarn-like strands that are looped around knitting needles. The answer lies in a technique invented by Milne in 2006 that involves aspects of knitting, lost-wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

You can see much more of Milne’s work at the Glass Art Society, on Facebook, and in her online gallery. (via Lustik)

 

 



Craft Food Photography

Low in Calories, High in Wool: Knitted Comfort Food by Jessica Dance and David Sykes

April 24, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Art director and model maker Jessica Dance redefines the meaning of “comfort food” with this new series of knitted lambswool recreations of common foods that from a distance could almost pass as the real thing. The project is a collaboration with food photographer David Sykes and is meant to encapsulate the feeling of British cafes and fast food restaurants with a woolly twist.