landscapes

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Photography

Headlights Cut Through Dense Fog in Moody Images of Cars at Night by Henri Prestes

November 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

They Drive by Night is an ongoing series by photographer Henri Prestes that captures the unsettling feeling of driving through the dim and deserted countryside at night. His darkened landscapes are lit almost exclusively by headlights, and are shrouded in dense fog. The series was photographed near remote villages and forests throughout Portugal and Spain, where the photographer was raised and explored at a young age.

“I started thinking about putting this project together during some night traveling, thinking about how exciting and scary it is traveling alone in secluded places with only the headlights to guide us through the immense darkness ahead,” Prestes tells Colossal. “At the same time I was trying to come up with a cinematic series about exploring the narrative possibilities of a single still frame, using weather conditions as a way to affect the emotional state of a photograph.” You can see more of his night-based images on his website and Instagram. (via Faith is Torment)

 

 



Art Illustration

Delicate Watercolor Landscapes Embodied by South African Wildlife

November 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

South Africa-based artist Sujay Sanan‘s series A Place I Know documents landscapes across the Western Cape, embedding the spaces inside animals that inhabit each. Sanan grew up in the Himalayas, and his new works are a way to explore his new surroundings, while also bringing attention to the increasing climate change and its effects on wildlife.

“My works document landscapes seen through the species that inhabit them,” he explains. “Some of the places I have painted are familiar and close to where I live, while in others I have found myself as a momentary visitor. While these works document what I fear might be lost, they are also filled with optimism.” You can see more of Sanan’s watercolor paintings on his website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Photography

Captivating Photographs of Storm Clouds by Camille Seaman Show Nature’s Power

November 7, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Camille Seaman travels the world capturing fleeting moments of power in diverse landscapes. From melting icebergs at both poles to stormy states across America, Seaman showcases the beauty, terror, and fragility of nature in her digital and film images. Seaman began storm-chasing after her daughter, eight years old at the time, suggested it might be of interest while the two were watching the Storm Chasers TV show. Her newest book,The Big Cloud, focuses on supercell storms around the U.S. It includes a forward by New Yorker science writer Alan Burdick, and includes behind-the-scenes shots and written reflections from Seaman about the experience of being a storm chaser.

“Sometimes as we pulled into a local fuel station, we would be met with superstitious folks who were not glad to see us; some of those people had lost their homes or loved ones in storms,” Seaman writes in the preface. “It was important to remember that these people lived here year after year, never knowing if this would be the day when a tornado might come through their town. It taught me great empathy and compassion. It was important that our chasing storms not become some sort of disaster tourism… I always wanted my images to speak to the duality of all things—to speak to the essential truth that there can be beauty in something terrible and vice versa, that there is no creation without destruction.”

In addition to authoring three books, Seaman is also a TED Senior Fellow, and has published works in National Geographic, The New York Times, and Outside Magazine. You can find The Big Cloud, published by Princeton Architectural Press, on Amazon. Follow the photographer’s travels on Instagram and Twitter.

 

 



Art Photography

Striking Aerial Photographs of Namibia’s Arid Landscape Appear as Abstract Paintings

October 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Australian photographer Leah Kennedy captured Namibia’s colorful, dry topography on a recent aerial safari. Much of the artist’s work is aerial, which satisfies her creative affinity for combining abstraction and duality in her photography. Kennedy traveled in a Cessna light aircraft, as well as in a helicopter sans doors, using a medium format camera. She shares with Colossal, “The resulting images are, at least temporarily, removed from their reality they take on different forms and in some cases appear to be of microscopic origins or reminiscent of something else entirely. This ambiguity and departure from reality is what intrigues and inspires my work.”

In addition to her fine art portfolio, Kennedy teaches workshops and offers tutorials on photography and Photoshop. You can see more of her site-specific series and purchase prints of select photographs on Kennedy’s website, and follow her work and travels on Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Rural Iceland Transformed Into A Rouge-Tinted World by Photographer Al Mefer

October 1, 2018

Anna Marks

Al Mefer transforms rural Iceland into a rouge-tinted world, producing images that make the area’s shrubbery look like candy floss, and moss-covered landscapes appear like red velvet cake. Mefer photographs a mixture of Icelandic topography, from iconic waterfalls to fields full of pink sheep. His photographs reveal the elements of the natural world that are often blurred into the background, such as the clustered patterns moss makes when growing on boulders, or how water froths was it spills over a waterfall.

Mefer’s project Dreamscapes of Iceland started while Mefer was traveling around the country with friends, and began to use a reflex camera to capture the country’s beautiful scenes. While exploring the Golden Circle, in the South of the country, Mefer photographed locations that would imprint an indelible memory upon him: Skógafoss’s waterfalls, cliffs and coastline, and Jökulsárlón’s glacial lake. “Iceland has been photographed a million times,” says Mefer, “I wanted to picture it in a way that it’d feel new yet as oneiric in the images as it is to see it live.”

The red and pink colors in Mefer’s photographs resemble the reddish hues inside the human body; the tones magnify the differences in texture and form between the living and non-living whilst having an emotional impact on the viewer. “Color affects us emotionally and I often focus my attention on it as a tool to rewrite reality,” he explains. Although some of Mefer’s photographs include people, a stillness is still captured in each photograph. “There’s a common trait among my projects to feel that the landscapes are mysterious and unexplored,” Mefer says. “They’re lonely even if populated.”

To view more of Mefer’s work visit his website and Instagram.

 

 



Photography

Black and White Analog Photographs Explore the Serenity of Long Meandering Roads

September 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Swedish photographer Håkan Strand works with old analog cameras and black and white film to capture landscapes that exude the serenity of a time past. The photographs often center around rural roads and explore the stillness that exists when one reaches the fringes of civilization. His recently published book Silent Moments will soon be available to purchase on his website, where you can find further studies of back roads and long desert highways in landscapes in the US, UK, and throughout Scandinavia. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art Photography

A New Three-Dimensional Installation by Chris Engman Invites the Viewer to Step Inside a Photograph

September 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Containment" (2018), site-specific installation created as a part of FotoFocus Biennial 2018 exhibition "Chris Engman: Prospect and Refuge" at the Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Art Gallery, photo by Tony Walsh

“Containment” (2018), site-specific installation created as a part of FotoFocus Biennial 2018 exhibition “Chris Engman: Prospect and Refuge” at the Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Art Gallery, photo by Tony Walsh

Artist Chris Engman transports natural landscapes such as waterfalls, caves, and vast deserts to domestic interiors by securing large-scale photographs to the room’s walls, ceilings, and floors. “I believe photography derives its power precisely from the fact it can’t be entered, however much we may want to,” Engman tells Colossal. “When I make photographs I try to be mindful of this, even to exploit it.”

His most recent work, Containment, is his first installation which allows visitors to step inside. The work features a rushing stream surrounded on two sides by dense forest, and on the top by a branch-covered sky. Engman thinks of the work as a singular photograph, even though it consists of more than three hundred individual prints applied to the surface of the installation’s temporary walls. Although the piece can be entered, unlike his other works, there is still a hesitation on the part of the viewer. Engman explains that once one enters the work its believability as a singular landscape becomes penetrated. Each step deeper inside the work makes the photographed landscape appear  increasingly warped and unreal.

“Even so,” says Engman, “compared to a singular framed photograph the experience of this installation for the viewer is much more physical and immersive. The structure is a room, not an image of a room. The photograph is an object, in addition to being an illusion. It has weight, and volume, and changes as you walk around it. Making this installation has been a  thrilling process, and this new way of working seems to afford many new possibilities.”

The work is curated by Carissa Barnard of FotoFocus and is exhibited alongside several of his photographs at the Cincinnati Arts Association’s Alice F. and Harris K. Weston Art Gallery in Cincinnati, Ohio through November 18. The exhibition is a part of the 2018 FotoFocus Biennial, a photography and lens-based presentation of over 400 artists at art spaces across Cincinnati, Dayton, Columbus, and Northern Kentucky. You can visit exhibitions and attend programming for the biennial through January 2019. Engman will have his third solo exhibition with Luis De Jesus Los Angeles in February 2019.

"Containment" (detail) (2018), photo by Tony Walsh

“Containment” (detail) (2018), photo by Tony Walsh

"Containment" (detail) (2018), photo by Tony Walsh

“Containment” (detail) (2018), photo by Tony Walsh

"Landscape for Candace" (2015), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

“Landscape for Candace” (2015), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

"Containment" (2015), Digital pigment print, 43 x 58 inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

“Containment” (2015), Digital pigment print, 43 x 58 inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

"Landscape for Quentin" (2017), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

“Landscape for Quentin” (2017), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

"Prospect" (2016), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

“Prospect” (2016), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

"Refuge" (2016), Digital pigment print, 43 x 53 inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

“Refuge” (2016), Digital pigment print, 43 x 53 inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

"Equivalence" (2017), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles

“Equivalence” (2017), Digital pigment print, 43 x 55½ inches, courtesy of the artist and Luis De Jesus Los Angeles