macro

Posts tagged
with macro



Art

Pacific Light: Macro Footage of Ink, Oil and Soap Shot by Ruslan Khasanov

July 27, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Russian graphic designer Ruslan Khasanov who is probably best known for his experiments in liquid typography just released this experimental video where he plays with the interaction between ink, oil, and soap. Khasanov says he became inspired while cooking with a mixture of oil and soy sauce when he noticed the small black beads begin to form at the bottom of a container. He then began playing with a mixture of ink and soap to create this amazing mix of blue, white, yellow, and magenta. See everything in motion in the video above, and you can see some larger stills over on Behance.

 

 



Photography

Can You Guess the Owner? New Macro Photos of Animal Eyes from Suren Manvelyan

April 3, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Photographer Suren Manvelyan took the web by storm back in 2011 with his Animal Eyes series, where he captured spectacular macro photographs of various critter’s eyes. Manvelyan is back with a new series of extreme close-ups which seem to peer right into the soul of various animals, even though it’s not exactly clear whose soul you’re looking at. I left captions off the photos above, but you can use the list below in order of appearance to check your answers. I got exactly one right.

1. Garden Tree Boa, 2. Gecko eublepharis, 3. Basiliscus lizard, 4. Gecko tokay, 5. Chinchilla, 6. Long-eared owl, 7. Fennec, 8. Raven.

 

 



Photography

Gorgeous Patterns of the Sea: Macro Photographs of Starfish by Alexander Semenov

February 6, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Photographer Alexander Semenov has done it again. This time the Russian biologist takes us on an up-close encounter with starfish, although looking at these neon carpets I had no idea what they were at first. Even after covering Alexander’s previous work with jellyfish, or Felix Salazar’s images of coral I’m constantly amazed at nature’s ability to create such vibrant beauty. (via flickr)

 

 



Photography

Vibrant Macro Photographs of Coral by Felix Salazar

January 17, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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LA-based photographer and composer Felix Salazar recently captured some wonderful macro photos of several inhabitants in his salt water aquariums. The shocking variety of color makes the coral look like digital renderings, but Salazar assures me each is a unique photo selected from hundreds of attempts to get just the right shot as he experimented with focus and light. You can see many more on his website. (via my modern met)

 

 



Photography

New High Speed Liquid Splash Photographs by Markus Reugels

December 14, 2012

Christopher Jobson

I never tire of seeing German photographer Markus Reugels’ (previously here and here) continued experiments with water splashes. It’s immediately apparent when looking at some of these recent photos from the last few months that his lighting, color, and timing techniques have continued to evolve, as each image is more impossibly complex than the last. See much more of his recent work here.

 

 



Photography

Remarkable Macro Photographs of Ice Structures and Snowflakes

December 5, 2012

Christopher Jobson

We’re all familiar with the most common shapes of ice: snow flakes, icicles, snowmen, cookie dough ice cream. But break out the macro lens and suddenly we’re in unfamiliar territory as ice branches out, curls in on itself, and grows in shapes that look more like the delicate leaves of ferns than solid cold water. Russian photographer Andrew Osokin has done a phenomenal job of capturing such bizarre ice formations, you can explore hundreds more photos over in his LensArt profile. (via the curious brain)

 

 



Photography

Vanishing Spirits: The Beautiful Dried Remains of Single-Malt Scotch by Ernie Button

November 16, 2012

Christopher Jobson


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In his photographic series Vanishing Spirits Phoenix-based photographer Ernie Button explores what happens after the last drop is drunk in his macro photographs of evaporated single-malt Scotch whiskey. Not unlike the recently featured work of Jason Tozer, Button turns the minute details of stained glass into curious landscapes and colorful terrain. Of the project he says:

The idea for this project occurred while putting a used Scotch glass into the dishwasher. I noted a film on the bottom of a glass and when I inspected closer, I noted these fine, lacey lines filling the bottom. What I found through some experimentation is that these patterns and images that you see can be created with the small amount of Single-Malt Scotch left in a glass after most of it has been consumed. The alcohol dries and leaves the sediment in various patterns. It’s a little like snowflakes in that every time the Scotch dries, the glass yields different patterns and results. I have used different color lights to add ‘life’ to the bottom of the glass, creating the illusion of landscape, terrestrial or extraterrestrial.

This is just a preview of a much larger project, see more in his portfolio. (via stacey thinx)