miniature

Posts tagged
with miniature



Design

Ultra Small Bonsai Plants Give New Meaning to the Word Miniature

May 19, 2014

Johnny Waldman

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What happens when you apply of love of small things to an art form that’s already all about small things? In recent years Bonsai—Japan’s art form of growing miniature trees in miniature planters—has undergone a miniaturization trend. Industry experts consider bonsai plants less than 3 cm (about 1 inch) to be particularly difficult, but artists have taken on the challenge, creating tiny plants and tiny planters that, literally, are at your fingertips. It’s given rise to a new category, known as cho-mini bonsai, or ultra-small bonsai.

It’s no secret that the Japanese excel at making things smaller, whether it’s automobiles, electronics or food. In fact, Japan’s love of small things can be found in literature dating back over a 1,000 years. When it comes to the land of the rising sun, it’s clear that beauty comes in small packages. (via Archie McPhee, RocketNews24)

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Art Food Photography

Culinary Photographers Create Edible Backdrops for a World of Miniature Inhabitants

January 3, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Against a tasty backdrop of pastries, fruit, and vegetables, photographers Pierre Javelle and Akiko Ida have created a series of humorous dioramas that depict miniature people going about their daily lives in an edible world. Titled MINIMIAM, a play on words that marries miniature and “yummy” (miam in French), the project has been ongoing since 2002 and was inspired by the married couple’s profession as commercial food photographers. “We’re both food photographer in our daily work, and we’re both quite crazy about cooking, eating and everything about food,” says Ida. “So when we started this small people series, naturally we created the stories related to the food.”

The figures acquired for each photograph are taken from train model sets which are generally 1/87 scale, the perfect size for exploring lands of donuts or a frothy mix of meringue turned into a winter sledding adventure. The body of work has now grown to include some 60 sets of diptychs, and the pair is also creating large scale installations that more directly connect the model train world with sprawling food dioramas. You can see much more of their work over at MINIMIAM, or view it up close at the International Agriculture Show in Paris in February. (via Raw File)

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Art Photography

Photographer Creates Lifelike Images of American Streets Using Toy Car Models and Forced Perspective

October 16, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Over his long career of making and building, self-taught photographer Michael Paul Smith has at times referred to himself as a text book illustrator, a wallpaper hanger and house painter, a museum display designer, an architectural model maker, and art director. All of these skills have culminated in the amazing ability to shoot forced perspective outdoor scenes using his extensive diecast model car collection. Something he calls his “quirky hobby.”

For nearly 25 years Smith has been working on a fictional town he refers to as Elgin Park where all of his miniature scenes take place. To make each shot he positions an old card table at scenic points around Boston and positions his minutely detailed cars and model sets on top. Using an inexpensive point-and-shoot camera and natural light he then snaps away, simply eye-balling the perspective to get everything right.

While these are his most recent photos, earlier shots from the collection have gone into a book titled Elgin Park: An Ideal American Town. To learn more you can read an extensive interview over on Fstoppers. All photos courtesy Michael Paul Smith. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Craft

Ordinary Behavior: Cardboard Electronics Containing Absurd Miniature Dioramas

June 25, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Artist and illustrator Kevin LCK works almost exclusively in black and white, so it comes as no surprise that as he’s ventured into sculptural objects the aesthetic has remained the same, while the dimensions clearly haven’t. In his new series Ordinary Behavior the artist builds dioramas into everyday electronic objects made from cardboard such as a computer, camera, and iPhone. The artist says his intention is to highlight the sometimes unhealthy relationship people have with technology and explains his thoughts in his artist statement:

‘Ordinary Behavior’ is a project about the unhealthy relationship between human and technology in an everyday context. […] I sought to detach the audience from the real world temporarily, provide them with a space to rethink and reconsider the way we behave and think about the relationship between ourselves, objects and environment with technology in a more conscious way.

You can see several more from the series here. (via beautiful/decay, junk culture)

 

 



Art Food Photography

Portion Control: New Photos of Tiny People Living in a World of Food by Christopher Boffoli

June 5, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Fine art photographer Christopher Boffoli (previously) just released a new body of work as a continuation of his Big Appetites series where he imagines tiny people living in a world of giant food. Boffoli opens a new exhibition tomorrow night called Portion Control at Winston Wächter Fine Art in New York where he’ll also have a few copies of his forthcoming book Big Appetites. All images courtesy the artist.

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Art Photography

Wonderful Conceptual Photo-manipulations by 14-Year-Old Photographer "Fiddle Oak"

May 28, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Today I discovered a photographer who has a camera named Betsy who tells me he’s been taking photographs for nearly six years. Y’know, since he was 8. I’m referring to Massachusetts-based photographer Fiddle Oak (his real name is Zev) who creates some impressive miniature photo-manipulations that he’s been sharing online with a growing audience for the last few years. Many of the images are a collaboration with Zev’s 18-year-old sister Nellie who helps with concepts and setup but all of the shooting and editing is done by Zev who is also frequently the subject of his own work. Somebody get this kid a scholarship to something. You can find much more of his work over on Flickr. (via david is going to die)