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Craft Design

Scenes From Award-Winning Literature Crafted With Hand-Cut Paper by Zim & Zou

April 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Paper artists and collaborators Zim & Zou (previously) were invited to create miniature worlds inspired by previous Nobel Prize winners in Literature. The tolerance-themed traveling exhibition Sharing Worlds was organized by the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation. The French duo built pieces based on Kristin Lavransdatter written by Sigrid Undset (published in 1920), and One Hundred Years of Solitude written by Gabriel Garcia Marquez (published in 1967). Using their own classic style, the pair created colorful scenes packed with geometric details. Their interpretation of Kristin Lavransdatter was created as an ode to 14th-century Norway with a technicolor city set between a pair of deep burgundy mountains. The other work, One Hundred Years of Solitude, features a verdant home nearly hidden from the world by a lush pink and green garden.

The exhibition closed last month, but you can take a virtual tour of it on the Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum Knowledge Foundation website. You can follow more of Zim & Zou’s recent work on their Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Art

Miniature Architectural Interiors and Collections of Tiny Symbolic Objects Carved into White Stone

December 14, 2018

Anna Marks

Elevation VI Rooke Chapel

Elevation VI Rooke Chapel

Copenhagen-based artist Matthew Simmonds (previously) carves miniature architectural interiors, angular shapes, and tiny windows filled with symbolic objects, trinkets, and animals. His ghostly white sculptural forms are cut from and presented within raw stone, which allows for a striking contrast between his designs and the medium’s natural surface. 

Although Simmonds mainly focuses on sacred architecture, particularly from the Medieval era, he is drawn to how cultures overlap and influence each other. His work often references a variety of architectural styles in one piece, and sometimes presents abstract forms. “I get inspired by real architectural spaces, but the works are not reproductions of actual buildings in miniature, with the exception of the Elevation series,” Simmonds tells Colossal.

His sculptures take a minimum of three weeks to complete, however they can span several months depending on the complexity and size. “The longest I’ve ever worked on a single piece of stone was when I made Windows in 2017,” explains Simmonds. “There was around 180 days, or nine months, of carving time with more time spent on research and design.” 

This particular piece was one of his most complex to date. Rows of carved openings collectively served as a curio cabinet, with each window filled with a range of creations, from a miniature iguana and array of small fruits to even tinier models of buildings and structures. Here Simmonds showcases the world in miniature, seen through the visual symbols of a variety of cultures. In the piece are also several references to San Francisco, as it was specifically created for a show in the Bay Area. To view more of the artist’s recent stone carvings, visit his website.

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Windows 2017

Muqarnas Study

Muqarnas Study

Muqarnas Study

Exedra

Fragment VIII

Cube

Cube

Windows 2017

Millennium

Elevation VI Rooke Chapel

Elevation VIII Mren Cathedral

 

 



Design

The Domino Clock

December 14, 2010

Christopher Jobson

I had to put all the family pictures back on the wall when I realized this is still just a prototype, but regardless the Domino Clock by Seattle-based Carbon Design Group is extremely cool. The dots on the three giant dominoes act as digits for hours and minutes, and everything communicates wirelessly to keep time. Another video via the Carbon site explains the clever engineering behind the tiny actuators that quietly flip “on” and “off” in sync with the time. According to their blog the goal is to produce a fully functional prototype in 2011, and the next one will arrive via FedEx to my house shortly thereafter. (via yanko)