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Art

Waterline: Pejac Unveils New Drawings to Be Exhibited in a Floating Gallery on Paris’ Seine River

May 15, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Continuously secretive and unexpected when it comes to revealing his projects, Pejac (previously) once again surprised the art world by announcing an upcoming self-produced pop-up solo exhibition in Paris. Roughly a year since his last showing at an old gondola workshop on the canals of Venice, and a month since his surprise visit to NYC, the Spanish artist just announced this new show titled Waterline.

To exhibit this selection of new work, Pejac found an old péniche boat that will be transformed into an unconventional floating art gallery from June 20-24th, 2018. Moored right next to Notre-Dame cathedral, this vintage vessel will host his most intimate show to date, presenting a large series of accomplished studio drawings. Works on paper are a crucial part of Pejac’s creative process and are usually the first step toward large public interventions or canvases, but are truly artworks in their own right.

“What people get to see on paper, on canvas, on a wall, or as a finished sculpture, is the end of a very long trip that starts inside of you.  When I start painting or drawing, that is the end, not the beginning of the process. Before that happens, I have already tried so many different ideas and made so many choices.” —Pejac for Spring issue of Juxtapoz Magazine

By showcasing previously unseen works, Waterline will grant the most direct look at the unmediated stage of the artist’s practice. Created mostly with charcoal or pencil on paper, these images are the early stages of concepts we’ve already seen turn into large pieces, or might still evolve into their final versions. Poetic and despairing, these striking pictures propose an unconventional future focused on the ways in which humans treat resources and the environment, as well as current socio-political issues and “modern society” values. You can see more of Pejac’s recent work on Instagram.

 

 



Dance Science

Spectacular Fans of Feathers Define the Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise Courtship Ritual

April 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

This short video from the Cornell Lab of Ornithology documents the spectacular plumage and mating dance of the Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise. In order to catch the attention of its female counterpart, the male Bird-of-Paradise flips its cape of black feathers into a large ruff that surrounds its head, while also fanning out an iridescent azure blue skirt of feathers from its breast. In a paper published by Timothy G. Laman and Edwin Scholes, this Indonesian bird was recently confirmed as a separate species based on its courtship behavior. You can learn more about the Vogelkop Superb Bird-of-Paradise in another video from Cornell and watch more videos about all things avian on the Lab’s YouTube channel. (via The Kid Should See This)

 

 



Craft

Shimmering Metallic Embroideries of Dragonflies and Other Insects by Humayrah Bint Altaf

March 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Bedford, England-based embroidery artist Humayrah Bint Altaf (previously) continues to construct ornate insects using shimmering threads and metallic beads. Her dragonflies, bees, beetles, and butterflies take shape using carefully paired patterns and colors that form wings, bodies, and even delicate feet. While Altaf takes artistic license with the exact shapes and colors in her embroideries, her use of bright, reflective materials adds a sense of life to these insect interpretations. The artist shares with Colossal:

I strive to create pieces that speak figuratively and literally of the colors and textures of trees, plants, beetles, bees, roots, twigs and other creatures that frequent my world. Light is an integral element of my handwork hence the materials I use reflect this. Soft gold leathers, vintage silks, antique gold cords, iridescent metal wires all call out to me and are woven into my pieces.

Altaf was recently recognized by The Worshipful Company of Girdlers for her contributions to Embroidery. She shares her work on Instagram and also sells her embroideries on Etsy.

 

 



Photography

Highlights from the 2018 Sony World Photography Awards Shortlist [20 Photos]

March 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Magical Sunrise, © Marcelo Portella, Brazil, Commended, Open, Landscape & Nature (2018 Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Culled from nearly 320,000 entries from more than 200 countries, the 2018 Sony World Photography Awards (previously) have announced their shortlist of winners. We’ve selected highlights from several categories, ranging from architecture and travel to contemporary issues and portraiture. Winners will be announced on April 19th. Images courtesy of the World Photography Organization.

Tjentiste, © Anastasia Riakovskaia, Russian Federation, Shortlist, Professional, Architecture (Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Enafrinat (‘the floured’), © Antonio Gibotta, Italy, Shortlist, Professional, Discovery (Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

绽放, © Lin Chen, China, Commended, Open, Travel (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Mammatus, © Mitch Dobrowner, United States of America, Shortlist, Professional, Natural World & Wildlife (2018 Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Braine Le Comte 2017 Belgium, © Paul D’Haese, Belgium, Shortlist, Professional, Discovery (Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Team Italia, © Adam Pretty, Australia, Shortlist, Professional, Sport (Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Perfect Toupee, © Wiebke Haas, Germany, Shortlist, Professional, Natural World & Wildlife (2018 Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

ANA’A BUILDING FACADE, SANA’A, YEMEN – 29 APRIL 2017: A building in the Yemeni capital damaged by ground fighting and gunfire during conflict in 2011. © Giles Clarke, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Professional, Current Affairs & News (Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Cenote II, © James Monnington, United Kingdom, Shortlist, Open, Landscape & Nature (2018 Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Bee Eaters Mating, © Petar Sabol, Croatia, Shortlist, Open, Wildlife (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Ballet, © Fredrik Lerneryd, Sweden, Shortlist, Professional, Contemporary Issues (Professional competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Patterns of Glacial River, © Manish Mamtani, India, Shortlist, Open, Travel (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Black and White, © Valentina Morrone, Italy, Shortlist, Open, Portraiture (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Before sunrise, Mount Kilauea volcano © Joseph Anthony, United Kingdom, Commended, Open, Landscape & Nature (2018 Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Smoke and Mirrors, © Lucie Goodayle, United Kingdom, Commended, Open, Still Life (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Untitled, © Pavlo Nera, Ukraine, Commended, Open, Street Photography (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Walking, © Suphakaln Wongcompune, Thailand, Commended, Open, Travel (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

A Wave of Fish, © Eric Madeja, Switzerland, Commended, Open, Wildlife (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

Sunset Double Exposure, © Poppy Cornell, United Kingdom, Commended, Open, Enhanced (Open competition), 2018 Sony World Photography Awards

 

 



Art

Johnny Joo Photographs Forgotten Structures Overtaken by Nature

February 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Johnny Joo explores abandoned structures overtaken by the natural surroundings that had originally been tamed to make space for them. Joo captures ferris wheels, cottages, malls, schools, armories, and thruways as they slip back into obscurity, covered in undergrowth, vines, and trees. Based in Cleveland, Ohio, the 27-year-old photographer has spent the last ten years traversing the country to explore abandoned spaces. In 2012, Joo started a blog, Architectural Afterlife, where he features his work and writes reflections on his explorations and the history of the all-but-forgotten locations. Joo has published three books of his photographs, and is currently working on a fourth book, which is available for pre-order. He also shares updates on InstagramTwitter, Facebook, and YouTube. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Design History Science

Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours: a Pre-Photographic Guide for Artists and Naturalists

January 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

First published in the pre-photographic age, Werner’s Nomenclature of Colours was the preeminent guide to color and its classification for artists, scientists, naturalists, and anthropologists in the 19th-century. Without an image for reference, the book provided immense handwritten detail describing where each specific shade could be found on an animal, plant, or mineral. Prussian Blue for instance could be located in the beauty spot of a mallard’s wing, on the stamina of a bluish-purple anemone, or in a piece of blue copper ore.

The system of classification was first devised by German mineralogist Abraham Gottlob Werner in the late 18th-century. Shortly after Scottish painter Patrick Syme updated Werner’s guide, matching color swatches and his own list of examples to the provided nomenclature.

The book’s poetic names, such as Arterial Blood Red, Berlin Blue, and Verdigris Green, added flourish to the writings of many researchers, allowing vivid descriptions for prose which had previously been limited to a more elementary color palette. Charles Darwin even used the guide during his voyage to the Madeira, Canary, and Cape Verde islands on the H.M.S. Beagle.

The 1814 book has now been republished by Smithsonian Books as a pocket-sized guide, providing a historic connection to vivid colors found in the field for a future generation of artists, scientists, and curious naturalists. You can preorder the 2018 hardcover for its release date on February 6, 2018.  (via Co.Design)

 

 



Photography Science

Radically Unusual Caterpillars Captured by Photographer Igor Siwanowicz

January 30, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Scientist and photographer Igor Siwanowicz (previously) has made a name for himself documenting the phenomenal range of shapes, colors, and structures of creatures in the natural world. His many images of unique caterpillars include wild variations like feathery blue spikes, curling burnt-orange horns, and long black whiskers. Siwanowicz also works as a neurobiologist at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute’s Janelia Farm Research Campus in Virginia. He shares more than ten years of his photography on photo.net.