nature

Posts tagged
with nature



Photography

Gorgeous Macro Photographs of Butterfly and Moth Wings by Linden Gledhill

March 26, 2014

Christopher Jobson

butter-1

butter-2

butter-3

butter-4

butter-5

butter-6

butter-7

butter-8

butter-9

butter-10

A biochemist by training, photographer Linden Gledhill is fascinated by the beauty of infinitesimally small aspects of nature and science, from capturing the flight of insects to exploring the beauty of magnetic ferrofluid. Among his most jaw-dropping images are macro photographs of butterfly wings that reveal complex patterns that look like perfectly organized flower petals. These tiny protrusions are actually scales, similar to what you would find on reptile, though extremely small and fragile. Gledhill’s photography recently inspired an episode of Smarter Every Day where Destin Sandlin learns how to shoot similar photos. (via awkwardsituationist.tumblr.com)

 

 



Photography

Creatures from Your Dreams and Nightmares: Unbelievable Marine Worms Photographed by Alexander Semenov

March 10, 2014

Christopher Jobson

MI QLD 2400 - Terebellidae - 2

11

Perinereis nuntia - 2391 - W.44302 - 2

Phyllodoce citrina

Polychaete - Syllidae unidentified 2

2337 - 2

2359 - 11

2436 - Syllidae - 7s

whaaat

IMG_3020

Nereis pelagica 4

Our favorite photographer of everything creepy and crawly under the sea, Alexander Semenov, recently released a number of incredible new photographs of worms, several of which may be completely unknown to science. Half of the photos were taken at the Lizard Island Research Station near the Great Barrier Reef in Australia during a 2-week conference on marine worms called polychaetes. Semenov photographed 222 different worm species which are now in the process of being studied and documented by scientists.

The other half of the photos were taken during Semenov’s normal course of work at the White Sea Biological Station in northern Russia where he’s head of the scientific divers team. We’ve previously featured the intrepid photographer’s work with jellyfish (part 2, part 3), and starfish.

 

 



Art

Artist Aganetha Dyck Collaborates with Bees to Create Sculptures Wrapped in Honeycomb

February 19, 2014

Christopher Jobson

bees-1

Photo by William Eakin

aganetha-more

Photos by William Eakin

In North America, Europe and many other parts of the world, bee populations have plummeted 30-50% due to colony collapse disorder, a fact not lost on artist Aganetha Dyck who for years has been working with the industrious insects to create delicate sculptures using porcelain figurines, shoes, sports equipment, and other objects left in specially designed apiaries. As the weeks and months pass the ordinary objects are slowly transformed with the bees’ wax honeycomb. It’s almost impossible to look at final pieces without smiling in wonder, imagining the unwitting bees toiling away on a piece of art. And yet it’s our own ignorance of humanity’s connection to bees and nature that Dyck calls into question, two completely different life forms whose fate is inextricably intertwined.

aganetha-4

aganetha-5

aganetha-6

aganetha-7

aganetha-1

aganetha-2

aganetha-3

aganetha-8

aganetha-9

aganetha-10

aganetha-11

aganetha-12

Born in Manitoba in 1937, the Canadian artist has long been interested in inter-species communication and her research has closely examined the the ramifications of honeybees disappearing from Earth. Working with the insects results in completely unexpected forms which can be surprising and even humorous. “They remind us that we and our constructions are temporary in relation to the lifespan of earth and the processes of nature,” comments curator Cathi Charles Wherry. “This raises ideas about our shared vulnerability, while at the same time elevating the ordinariness of our humanity.”

If you want to learn more I suggest watching the video above from the Confederation Centre of the Arts, and if you want to see her work up close Dyck opens an exhibition titled Honeybee Alterations at the Ottawa School of Art on March 3, 2014. A huge thanks to Gibson Gallery as well as Aganetha and Deborah Dyck for their help. All photos courtesy Peter Dyck and William Eakin.

 

 



Photography

Highlights from the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards Shortlist

February 5, 2014

Christopher Jobson

sony-1

That’s dance. © Hasan Baglar, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards

sony-2

Lightsnake. © Holger Schmidtke, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards

sony-3

In your youth, nothing can stop you from enjoying time with your friends, especially not a simple matter of rain during summer fun. You may grow up and forget the names, but you’ll always remember the moments, the time on the dock with your friends during a surprise shower. © Samantha Fortenberry, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-4

A baby Orangutan peeking out from his mother’s embrace. © Chin Boon Leng, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-5

Homebound. © Ata Mohammad Adnan, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-6

In July each year, this heart-pounding scene of wildebeests migration repeats itself in Kenya. © Bonnie Cheung, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-7

Aerial image of river delta in Iceland. © Emmanuel Coupe, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-8

Pilgrims and devotees cross pontoon bridges at the Maha Kumbh Mela – the largest spiritual gathering on the planet, held every 12 years in India. © Wolfgang Weinhardt, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-9

An overhead view, from the skies above Poland. © Kacper Kowalski, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-10

Interior of an abandoned cooling tower. © Jan Stel, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-11

China, Jiangyin, Jiangsu. Rows of identical houses with a playground seen in the middle in the city of Jiangyin. © Kacper Kowalski, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-12

A muddy face from the mud bath, going into the lake. © Alpay Erdem, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-13

The knight and his steed, a tropical capture in Costa Rica. © Nicolas Reusens, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

sony-14

Disaster Zone. © Alison Crea, 2014 Sony World Photography Awards.

The World Photography Organization just announced the shortlist for the 2014 Sony World Photography Awards. This year’s contest received more than 140,000 entries from 166 countries. The judges will announce the final winners in March and April of this year, but for now here are a selection of highlights from the shortlist courtesy the World Photography Organization. (via Next Draft)

 

 



Amazing

Amazing Video Clips Visually Isolate the Flight Paths of Birds

January 20, 2014

Christopher Jobson

birds-1

birds-1

Chances are if you’ve on the internet over the last few years you’ve run into a few amazing bird murmuration videos, like this one from Islands and Rivers or the one we featured on Colossal from Neels Castillion, where countless numbers of starlings flock together and move almost impossibly in concert. Artist Dennis Hlynsky, a professor at the Rhode Island School of Design, wondered what would happen if he could better trace the flight paths of individual birds, what kinds of patterns would emerge from these flying social networks?

Hlynsky first started filming birds in 2005 using a small Flip video recorder, but now uses a Lumix GH2 to record gigabytes of bird footage from locations around Rhode Island. He then edits select clips with After Effects and other tools to create brief visual trails that illustrate the path of each moving bird. Non-moving objects like trees and telephone poles remain stationary, and with the added ambient noise of where he was filming, an amazing balance between abstraction and reality emerges. The birds you see aren’t digitally animated or layered in any way, but are shown just as they’ve flown, creating a sort of temporary time-lapse. Above are three of my favorite videos, but he has many more including the movement of insects, ducks, and other animals.

 

 



Photography

A Maldives Beach Awash in Bioluminescent Phytoplankton Looks Like an Ocean of Stars

January 18, 2014

Christopher Jobson

bio-2

bio-1

bio-3

bio-4

bio-6

bio-5

While vacationing on the Maldives Islands, Taiwanese photographer Will Ho stumbled onto an incredible stretch of beach covered in millions of bioluminescent phytoplankton. These tiny organisms glow similarly to fireflies and tend to emit light when stressed, such as when waves crash or when they are otherwise agitated. While the phenomenon and its chemical mechanisms have been known for some time, biologists have only recently began to understand the reasons behind it. You can see a few more of Ho’s photographs over on Flickr.