nature

Posts tagged
with nature



Photography

More of the Best Nature GIFs on the Web

August 14, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Back in February we first explored an ongoing project called Head Like an Orange (previously) by a Netherlands-based artist named Marinus who isolates key segments of nature films, often just a split second in length, and uses the footage to create beautiful, whimsical, and strangely poetic gifs. These are a few of my favorites from the last several months but you can see much more right here.

 

 

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Photography

The Most Beautifully Terrifying Spiders You Never Knew Existed

August 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Mirror Spider / Thwaitesia sp. / Singapore


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Long Horned Orb Weaver / Macracantha arcuata / Singapore

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Bird Dung Spider / Pasilobus sp. / Singapore

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Ladybird Mimic / Paraplectana sp. / Singapore

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Eight-Spotted Crab Spider / Platythomisus octomaculatus / Singapore

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Tree Stump Orb Weaver / Poltys illepidus / Singapore

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Net-Casting Ogre-Face Spider / Deinopis sp. / Singapore

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Ant Mimic Jumping Spider / Myrmarachne plataleoides / Singapore

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Wide-Jawed Viciria Spiderlings / Viciria praemandibularis / Singapore

Wow! Ick. Oooh. Whaaaaaaat. No. No. NOPE. That pretty much summarizes my reactions while looking at these incredible macro shots of spiders photographed by Nicky Bay who lives and works in Singapore. The boundless biodiversity found on the country’s several islands includes a vast array of insects and arachnids, many of which Bay has painstakingly documented up close with his macro photography and published on his blog and Flickr account.

Despite being creepy crawly spiders, it’s impossible to deny the endless creativity employed by evolution to create such amazing creatures. It’s hard to believe these lifeforms came from the same planet let alone the same country. For instance the Mirror Spider has an abdomen of reflective panels that glitter like a disco ball, or the various colors of Ladybird Mimic spiders that are almost indistinguishable from the insects they are camouflaged to look like. But there’s also the more frightening Two-Tailed Spider or the Bird Dung Spider that would have me scrambling for a frying pan and a quart of poison before I would even consider picking up a camera.

Nadia Drake over at Wired put together an informative gallery of Bay’s work along with a bit more detail than you’ll find here. All images above courtesy the photographer. (via Coudal)

 

 



Photography

Jellyfish Photographed Against the Sky by Alexander Semenov

July 8, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Photographer Alexander Semenov (previously) who is well known for his documentation of oceanic wildlife, recently turned his camera upward and captured some fascinating photographs of jellyfish against the clouds and various sunsets. In some instances the water was so clear appears as if the animals are practically hovering in the sky. See much more over on Flickr.

 

 



History Photography

A 102-Year-Old Transport Ship Sprouts a Floating Forest

June 3, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Homebush Bay in Sydney, Australia is home to the remnants of a ship-breaking yard that operated during the mid 20th-century. Large watercraft that outlived their usefulness were towed to Homebush Bay and dismantled to salvage any components that could be reused or sold for scrap.

One such ship was the SS Ayrfield, a 1,140-tonne behemoth built in 1911 as a steam collier that was later used during WWII as a transport ship. In 1972 it was brought to Homebush Bay to be dismantled, but fate would decide differently. Operations at the ship-breaking yard subsequently ceased and parts of several large vessels including the Ayrfield were left behind, the largest objects in an area now infamous for decades of chemical dumping and pollution. But only this century-old transport ship would be transformed by time into a floating forest, a peculiar home for trees and other vegetation that have since sprouted over the last few decades.

From 2008-2010 a concerted effort was made to remove many of the lingering chemicals in Homebush left from the industrial era. Not far away is the Brickpit Ring Walk, a former industrial site where nearly three billion bricks were made from 1911 through the 1980s that is now a carefully protected natural habitat. As the forest has grown inside the SS Ayrfield, the bay is now a popular place for photographers who wish to capture the uncanny sight of this strangely beautiful relic of the bay’s industrial past, not to mention nature’s resiliency.

A huge thanks to Bruce Hood, Andy Brill and Stephane & Eva for providing photos for this post. If you liked reading about the SS Ayrfield you might also like the Glass Beach in California. (via my modern met)

 

 



Art Illustration

Surreal Wildlife Paintings by Tiffany Bozic

May 22, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Self-taught artist Tiffany Bozic explores a wide range of natural themes in her tightly rendered depictions of wildlife. Drawing inspiration from her “extensive travels to wild places” and exposure to various research specimens at the California Academy of Sciences in San Francisco, the artist works most frequently with multiple layers of watered down acrylic paint on panels of maple wood that lends a distinctly natural and often realistic level of detail to each of her paintings. Bozic is currently working on a new body of work for a solo show at FFDG this coming October, but for now you can see more work in her portfolio (and archive) on her website.

 

 



Art

Bottom Feeders: Ceramic Objects Encrusted with Marine Life by Mary O’Malley

April 25, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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As if lifted from the wreckage of the Titanic, ceramic artist Mary O’Malley creates sculptural porcelain teapots, cups, and vases adorned with barnacles, tentacles, and other living sea creatures (she refers to them as “porcelain crustaceans”).

 

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