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Art

Impasto Mountains Rise from the Canvas in Richly Textured Paintings by Conrad Jon Godly

February 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #5" (2018), oil on canvas, 170 x 170 cm

“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #5” (2018), oil on canvas, 170 x 170 cm, all images courtesy of JD Malat Gallery

Conrad Jon Godly (previously) paints in thick, impasto strokes to form snow-capped peaks and mountain ranges in icy black, white, and blue. The textured formations on canvas have feathered edges that mimic the high altitude wind, a technique that makes you almost feel the subject’s arctic blast. The works are at once abstract and hyperreal. Blunt gestures of his paint knife obscure any sort of image at close viewing, and yet a pristine image of a mountain comes into view when one takes a few steps back.

Godly grew up in Davos, Switzerland amid the Swiss Alps, an environment that has become his muse. “My surroundings have a huge influence on me, artistically and personally,” he explains in the press release of his current exhibition To See is Not to Speak at JD Malat Gallery in London. “I don’t see myself as a landscape painter, I am interested in capturing the mood and feeling of light, or the reflection of the moon on snow.”

Godly had a previous life as a photographer where he learned how to harness light and understand visual texture. These lessons he brings into his large-scale canvases, which evoke the moody experience of cloudy mountain ranges covered in fresh snow. Currently the artist lives between Switzerland and Japan. His work is currently being exhibited at the Zona Maco art fair in Mexico City with JD Malat Gallery until February 10, 2019, and his solo exhibition with the gallery runs through March 2, 2019. You can see more of Godly’s paintings on his website and Instagram.

"TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #2" (2018), oil on canvas, 150 x 130 cm

“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #2” (2018), oil on canvas, 150 x 130 cm

"TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #12" (2018), oil on canvas, 150 x 130 cm

“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #12” (2018), oil on canvas, 150 x 130 cm

Conrad Jon Godly, "TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #4" (2018), oil on canvas, 170 x 140 cm, all images courtesy of JD Malat Gallery

Conrad Jon Godly, “TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #4” (2018), oil on canvas, 170 x 140 cm

"TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #6" (2018), Oil on Canvas, 170 x 230 cm

“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #6” (2018), Oil on Canvas, 170 x 230 cm

"TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #7" (2018), oil on canvas, 200 x 170 cm

“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #7” (2018), oil on canvas, 200 x 170 cm

"TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #10" (2018), oil on canvas, 170 x 200 cm

“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #10” (2018), oil on canvas, 170 x 200 cm

"TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #11" (2018), oil on canvas, 200 x 200 cm

“TO SEE IS NOT TO SPEAK #11” (2018), oil on canvas, 200 x 200 cm

 

 



Art

Oil Paintings by Clive Head Layer Gestures to Express the Passage of Time

December 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

British artist Clive Head captures the complex beauty of everyday movements in his dizzying oil paintings. His long career has seen a dramatic evolution of his style, from early work in the tradition of Realism to more recent math-inspired works. Head first gained prominence in the 1990s for his Realist urban landscapes, but began to experiment with spatial mathematics in the 2000’s, sparking his current intuitive style.

“Rejecting the conventions of perspective, the resulting panoramas seamlessly merged different spaces into plausible but impossible totalities,” a statement on the artist’s website explains. Often set in cities, Head’s painting’s depict travelers on public transit or customers at coffee shops, environments where frequent and dense movements are natural. Each painting contains fractured gestures that demonstrate changes in time, while also presenting a psychological perspective.

The artist, who lives and works in York, U.K., has exhibited his paintings widely, and previously founded and chaired the Fine Art department at U.C.Scarbrough for York University. In addition to painting, Head also works in printmaking, drawing, and has published essays on painting. You can explore more of the artist’s work on his website. (via Hi-Fructose)

 

 



Art

Swaths of Old-Fashioned Fabric Obscure Faces and Bodies in Unsettling Portraits by Markus Åkesson

July 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Now You See Me” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

In his paintings, Swedish artist Markus Åkesson depicts ornately patterned fabrics like toile, chintz, and silks wrapped around female subjects. Instead of using the old-fashioned textiles simply as signifiers of wealth and tradition, he uses the materials to take on a more sinister tone. In some of the paintings you can see expressions of sadness in the subject’s faces, while in others, the textiles completely overtake the figures beneath, obscuring their identity and emotions.

“As a child, I often sat and looked at the different patterns in textiles and tapestries,” Åkesson shares with Colossal. “I would find my own images in them, my own world, and I would dream away. For me, the pattern as a concept has a built in feeling of safety and stability, because it repeats itself over and over again. I think the use of patterns in images that depicts more melancholic or even disturbing scenes makes a interesting feeling of duality.”

The artist is represented by Galerie Da-End in Paris and VIDA Museum in Öland, Sweden, where he recently had a solo show. You can see more of Åkesson’s work on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

“Now You See Me (Opium)” (2018), oil on canvas, 180 x 140cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“No One Can See You (Dysmorphia II)” (2017), oil on canvas, 50 x 60cm

“Palmistry” (2016), oil on canvas, 100 x 120cm

“I Never Wanted You To Leave” (2016), oil on canvas, 210 x 180cm

“The Unicorn Hunt ll” (2017), oil on canvas, 200 x 170cm

 

 



Art

New Oil Paintings That Trace Fictitious Memories by Joshua Flint

July 4, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Towards the door we never opened, oil on linen, 45″ x 28″

Joshua Flint (previously) paints scenes in relationship to the way we access old memories in our mind, blurring motions and obscuring the identities of his works’ subjects. The visual narratives are not linear, but rather create a surreal mash-up of landscapes and worlds, sourcing inspiration from digitized museum archives, vintage shops, and social media.

“The paintings fluctuate between the familiar and the unknown while simultaneously including the past and present,” said Flint in an artist statement. “By rearranging the hierarchy of elements the paintings become fictions that allow countless interpretations. Layered into works are references to liminality, ecological issues, neuroscience, psychological states, and the history of painting, among others.”

Flint has upcoming solo exhibitions at Seager / Gray Gallery in Mill Valley, California and Robert Lange Studios in Charleston, South Carolina this fall. You can see more of his oil paintings and studio sketches on his Instagram.

The World Between, oil on canvas, 48" x 48"

The World Between, oil on canvas, 48″ x 48″

The Guest, oil on wood panel, 36" x 36"

The Guest, oil on wood panel, 36″ x 36″

Carousel, oil on wood panel, 36" X 48"

Carousel, oil on wood panel, 36″ X 48″

The Volunteers, oil on wood panel, 30" x 40"

The Volunteers, oil on wood panel, 30″ x 40″

Threshold, oil on wood panel, 36" X 48"

Threshold, oil on wood panel, 36″ X 48″

The Assistant, oil on wood panel, 36" x 36"

The Assistant, oil on wood panel, 36″ x 36″

Future Present, oil on wood panel, 12" x 12"

Future Present, oil on wood panel, 12″ x 12″

The Projectionist, oil on wood panel,12" x 12"

The Projectionist, oil on wood panel,12″ x 12″

 

 



Art Photography

Oil Paintings That Integrate Oversized Animals Into Found Vintage Photographs by Anja Wülfing

June 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Anja Wulfing adds large animals into the black and white scenes of found vintage photographs, turning the attention away from the somber faces of its subjects and to the creatures that pose quite naturally behind their backs. The surprising inclusions are painted in by Wulfing, and often take the form of birds—such as crows, owls, ducks, and the occasional rooster. The animals either join the members of the photograph or merge with its occupants, sometimes replacing the heads of those posing to create hybrid and humorous creatures.

You can see more of Wulfing’s subtle animal additions on her Instagram and Behance. (via Lustik)

 

 



Art

Mimesis: New Anatomical Paintings Depicting Flora and Fauna by Nunzio Paci

June 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Bologna-based Italian artist Nunzio Paci (previously here and here) produces hauntingly detailed paintings that combine anatomical renderings with multi-colored blossoms and leaves. His latest series, Mimesis, is inspired by the idea of species evolving together over time, and the similarities shared by different organisms in order to better adapt to predators and climate.

“The concept, deriving from Plato and Aristotle’s theory on reality and imitation, draws inspiration from the natural phenomenon of mimicry in evolutionary biology and gives it a broader meaning,” Paci explained to Colossal. “In Mimesis, flora and fauna not only copy one another, they enmesh themselves in each other’s existence forming a cohesive organism, in an attempt to take shelter from the totality of the outside world.”

Within the series fauna helps to protect flora, creating a symbiotic relationship through the included animals’ death and rebirth. Flowers fill the hallows of presented carcasses while leaves grow to surround and overtake human skulls.

Paci recently exhibited these works as part of a solo show titled Mimesis at Galerie Stephanie in Manilla, Philippines and is currently a part of the group exhibition Dark Nature at Last Rites Gallery in New York City. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Art

Monochromatic Portraits Obscured by Colorful Abstract Markings by Guim Tió Zarraluki

April 5, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Barcelona-based artist Guim Tió Zarraluki paints pieces tied to memory and how it is obscured over time, covering the faces of his subjects in bright swaths of oil paint. His research as of late has brought him to topics such as how things slip into oblivion or are saved forever on our technological devices, areas which are abstractly displayed within his work.

In his latest series No Name Project, the individuals have minimal lines that mark their faces’, while in Now, Remember swirls and concentric circles take over the entirety of each visage. You can see more of his portraits from past series on his Instagram and Facebook.