oil painting

Posts tagged
with oil painting



Art

Vintage Cameras Focus on the Surveillance of Modern Life in Jeff Bartels’s Uncanny Paintings

October 5, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Surveillance Speed Graphic” (2021), oil on linen, 30 x 30 inches. All images © Jeff Bartels, shared with permission

“I’m not sure it’s possible to walk down a city street these days and not be caught on a camera somewhere, either by choice or not even knowing about it.” This idea grounds Surveillance, a series of uncanny paintings in oil by Canadian artist Jeff Bartels. Situated in urban settings with a distinctly retro flair, the works nestle vintage cameras among architecture and infrastructural elements. Oversized lenses, knobs, and levers echo the shapes of windows and doorways with branding imitating signs for shops and restaurants.

Sandwiching the devices between cafes and storefronts or subway stairs, Bartels explores the ubiquity of cameras and how they’re embedded into modern life. “If you look at the people in the paintings, none of them are doing anything particularly noteworthy or interesting. They are all just living their lives in front of a camera, some by choice, some oblivious to that fact,” he shares, noting that the surreal scenes aren’t intended to be altogether sinister. Privacy concerns aside, the paintings also speak to the increased prevalence of photographs and the ability to document and share even the most mundane moments on social media.

In addition to the cameras that feature heavily in Surveillance, the Toronto-based artist has placed other technologies like cassette tapes and stereos among his street-side scenes. See some of those works below, and find more on Instagram.

 

“Surveillance Target Six-16” (2021), oil on linen, 22 x 14 inches

“Surveillance Yashica” (2021), oil on linen, 24 x 20 inches

“Surveillance Rolleiflex” (2021), oil on linen, 24 x 30 inches

“Surveillance Electric Eye” (2021), oil on linen, 30 x 20 inches

“Surveillance C16” (2022), oil on linen, 24 x 20 inches

In reference to the song “Grace, Too” by The Tragically Hip

“Post and Truth” (2021), oil on linen, 30 x 40 inches

 

 



Art

Introspective Oil Paintings by Laura Berger Convey Transformation and Protection Through Entwined Bodies

September 8, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Chrysalis” (2022), oil on canvas, 40 x 54 inches. All images courtesy of Stephanie Chefas Projects, shared with permission

In Chrysalis, artist Laura Berger encapsulates the raw emotional energy of transformation in a soft, subdued color palette of blues and pinks. The solo show on view now at Stephanie Chefas Projects features a collection of oil paintings that center on entwined figures, their bodies protected by each other and their limbs sometimes positioned as shields.

In comparison to Berger’s earlier paintings, this body of work diverges in opacity, with translucent appendages and torsos emerging through other figures. Moonlight or a sheer veil similarly blanket some of the subjects as they huddle together in compact groups. The artist describes the works:

I’m interested in painting as a means to explore what it means to be human, what it means to be alive in this time and connected to each other—all with our own histories, our stories—but sharing in our collective humanity and our ties to what came before us and what will come next. I initially started painting as a therapeutic practice, and that continues to be the foundation for my work: using color as a centering healing tool and a way to sit with different combined energies; using narrative and composition exploration as a way to work through various experiences or memories.

If you’re in Portland, you can see Chrysalis through September 24. Otherwise, find more from Berger on Instagram, and find available prints in her shop.

 

“Accommodation” (2022), oil on canvas, 34 x 26 inches.

“Sheath” (2022), oil on canvas, 44 x 32 inches.

“The Rose Veil” (2022), oil on canvas, 40 x 52 inches.

“A Fleeting Touch 2” (2022), oil on canvas, 11 x 14 inches.

“Portrait of a Woman Dissolving” (2022), oil on canvas, 40 x 24 inches.

“Fresh” (2022), oil on canvas, 40 x 34 inches.

“A Fleeting Touch 1” (2022), oil on canvas, 11 x 14 inches.

 

 



Art

Ruled by Children, Kevin Peterson’s Paintings Find Hope Among Environmental Collapse

September 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Steady” (2022), oil on cradled wood panel, 36 × 24 inches. All images © Kevin Peterson, shared with permission

Houston-based artist Kevin Peterson (previously) continues to translate the uncertainty of today’s world into dystopian works with equal amounts despair and optimism. Scenes brimming with waste material and urban decay find boundless confidence and life in children, who unflinchingly nuzzle up to polar bears or balance atop a crumbling brick wall. Offering hope in the face of climate catastrophe and economic collapse, Peterson’s oil paintings are deeply personal, sometimes reflecting his own son and daughter as subjects. The artists tells Colossal:

I hope the coming generations are wiser, more empathetic, more courageous.  When I’m watching my kids, I’m always projecting my own insecurities and fears onto them, assuming they will suffer from my own deficiencies. I can not tell you how excited I feel when I see them diverge from those characteristics, and I realize they are not me. They are better than me in so many ways, and that is what anchors my hope for them and the future.

Many of Peterson’s works shown here are on view through September 24 at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles, which also has a couple of prints available. You can also follow his forward-looking practice on Instagram.

 

“Cove” (2022), oil on cradled wood panel, 24 × 18 inches

“Stay,” oil on panel, 28 x 28 inches

“Fellowship” (2022), oil on cradled wood panel, 32 × 24 inches

“Company” (2022), oil on cradled wood panel, 32 × 24 inches

“Fall” (2022), oil on cradled wood panel, 20 × 16 inches

 

 



Art

The Aquatic and Terrestrial Life of Southern California Merges into Hybrid Creatures in Jon Ching’s Paintings

August 22, 2022

Grace Ebert

“King Tide.” All images © Jon Ching, courtesy of Beinart Gallery, shared with permission

Los Angeles-based artist Jon Ching imagines the fantastic possibilities of melding Earth’s flora and fauna, rendering bizarre creatures with mushroom feathers and striped tulip fins. His latest oil paintings, which are on view this fall in Habitat at Beinart Gallery, extend this interest in hybridity by blending aquatic, aerial, and terrestrial organisms and their environments.

Marine ecosystems appear in many of the pieces, alongside cacti and succulents native to Ching’s home in southern California. In “King Tide,” for example, rising water approaches a cockatoo with plant-like plumage, and “Acclimate” depicts two green parrots perched on aloe growing below the surface. Each work envisions how different ecologies could converge and references nature’s resilience, the climate crisis, and the growing necessity of adapting to a changing world.

Ching’s solo show Habitat runs from September 11 to October 2 in Melbourne. Prints and stickers are available in his shop, and you can follow his latest works on Instagram.

 

“Acclimate”

“Reparation”

Left: “Hygge.” Right: “Think Tank”

“Double Vision”

“Flash Point”

Left: “Jungle Gym.” Right: “Neogenesis”

“Long Game”

 

 



Art

In Introspective Paintings, Artist Ocom Adonias Explores Narratives of Blackness

August 19, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Here After,” oil on canvas, 200 x 180 centimeters. All images © Ocom Adonias, shared with permission

Fusing history with the political and social contexts of today, Ocom Adonias’s work interprets the experience of moving through the world in a Black body. His vibrant, realistic paintings portray people in ordinary moments of ritual, solitude, and bonding, honing in on individual narratives to convey a broader message. “I’m particularly interested in the global conversation of what being an African and what being Black means, history, and the representation of the Black figure in the contemporary sense,” he shares.

Having worked primarily with charcoal on newspapers for years, Adonias recently shifted to oil painting, swapping the hazy layers of his previous works for bold color palettes and clean lines. He continues to focus on those around him, though, translating their conversations into intimate, introspective pieces.

The artist is based in Kampala, Uganda, and has a residency at Montresso Art Foundation slated for this fall. Currently, he’s working on a painting referencing myth and Michaelangelo’s “The Creation of Adam” fresco, which you can follow on Instagram.

 

“Letters from us,” newspapers and oil on canvas, 150 x 130 centimeters

“Saloon secrets (we are who we were),” oil and collage on canvas, 130 x 150 centimeters

“King Adebwa”

“Utopia duality,” newspapers and oil on canvas, 200 x 150 centimeters

 

 



Art

Bizarrely Flexible Wildlife Twist into Acrobatic Poses in Bruno Pontiroli’s Perspective-Bending Paintings

July 27, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Le Quintupède I” (2021), oil on wood panel, 80 x 70 centimeters. All images © Bruno Pontiroli, courtesy of Beinart Gallery, shared with permission

Kangaroos, koalas, and the venomous platypus take on peculiarly acrobatic personas in a new series of oil paintings by Bruno Pontiroli (previously). In Expression Corporelle, the French artist renders a cast of gymnast-emulating animals native to Australia, each with unusually strong appendages and flexible backs. The creatures balance on their tails and bend at perfect 90-degree angles, defying physics in favor of warped perspectives and the opportunity to see the world from a different point of view.

Expression Corporelle is on view through August 7 at Beinart Gallery in Brunswick. Pontiroli also sells prints on his site, and you can find more of his shape-shifting characters on Instagram. (via Supersonic Art)

 

“Psychologie Inversée II” (2021), oil on wood panel, 40 x 30 centimeters

Left: “La Queue Leu Leu I” (2021), oil on wood panel, 60 x 50 centimeters. Right: “Figure De Style I” (2021), oil on wood panel, 60 x 50 centimeters

“Le Diable Au Corps” (2021), oil on wood panel, 50 x 40 centimeters

“Figure De Style II” (2021), oil on wood panel, 60 x 50 centimeters

“Le Pieds Marin” (2022), oil on linen, 81 x 100 centimeters

Left: “Le Quintupède II” (2021), oil on wood panel, 80 x 70 centimeters. Right: “Psychologie Inversée I” (2021), oil on wood panel, 40 x 30 centimeters

“Les Basses Voltiges II” (2021), oil on wood panel, 30 x 24 centimeters