optical illusion

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Art

A Single Photograph by Bela Borsodi Looks Like Four Separate Images

June 20, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Although this image by Bela Borsodi (nsfw) appears to be four separate images, it’s actually a single photograph, with all of the objects perfectly aligned to create an optical illusion. The shot was used as cover art for an album titled Terrain by VLP. See it all come together in the video above.

 

 



Art

Wooden Illusions: Incredibly Lifelike Objects Carved from Wood by Tom Eckert

May 28, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Arizona-based artist Tom Eckert creates incredibly lifelike sculptures out of little more than wood, paint and patience. Working primarily with basswood, linden and limewood that is then coated with fine layers of lacquer paint, the artist can create realistic wrinkles in fabric or reflections that are almost impossible to discern from the real thing. Eckert says of his work:

Forms carved to suggest cloth recur in many of my pieces. By tradition, cloth has been widely used to conceal and shroud objects in practices ranging from advertising to church rituals. Covered forms are often more evocative – with a sense of mystery absent from the uncovered object by itself. I remember in church one Lent, as a child, being mystified while gazing at the statues shrouded with purple cloth.

You can watch the video above to learn more about his technique or explore his online galleries to see much more. If you liked this, also check out the work of Randall Rosenthal. (via twisted sifter)

 

 



Art

The Skewed, Anamorphic Sculptures and Engineered Illusions of Jonty Hurwitz

January 21, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Some figurative sculptors carve their artworks from unforgiving stone, while others carefully morph the human form from soft blocks of clay. Artist Jonty Hurwitz begins with over a billion computer calculations before spending months considering how to materialize his warped ideas using perspex, steel, resin, or copper.

Born in Johannesburg in 1969, Hurwitz now lives and works in London where he’s somewhat of a renaissance man, focusing both on his artwork and micro-loan website Wonga which he co-founded in 2007. His anamorphic sculptures rely on scans of objects (hands, faces, frogs) that are then distorted digitally and fabricated, but when placed in front of a cylindrical mirror the projected reflection reveals the original object. Still, other works deal with pixelated or sliced human forms that are only viewable from a single perspective. A scientist at heart, Hurwitz explained to me that his artwork is his way of “expressing calculations visually,” and also allows him to experiment with cutting-edge manufacturing and fabrication technologies. Of the more mind-bending anamorphic pieces, he shares:


For the anamorphic pieces its an algorithmic thing, distorting the original sculptures in 3D space using 2πr or πr3 (cubed). Much of it is mathematical, relying on processing power. There is also a lot of hand manipulation to make it all work properly too as spacial transformation have a subtle sweet spot which can only be found by eye. Generally I will 3D scan my subject in a lab and then work the model using Mathematica or a range of 3D software tools. I think the π factor is really important in these pieces. We all know about this irrational number but the anamorphic pieces really are a distortion of a “normal” sculpture onto an imaginary sphere with its centre at the heart of the cylinder.

I strongly urge you to watch the two embedded videos above to get a sense of how remarkably precise each artwork appears up close. What I’ve shown you here is honestly just the tip of the iceberg; please head on over to his website, Facebook, Saatchi profile, and Youtube to see more of his work. He’ll also have a piece on display at the Kinetica art show in London in February. The photography above was taken by Niina Keks, Otto Pierratto, Richard Ivey, Alex Brenner and Jonty Hurwitz and provided courtesy of the artist.

 

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Art

Artist Shintaro Ohata Seamlessly Blends Sculpture and Canvas to Create 3D Paintings

January 18, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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When first viewing the artwork of Shintaro Ohata up close it appears the scenes are made from simple oil paints, but take a step back and you’re in for a surprise. Each piece is actually a hybrid of painted canvas and sculpture that blend almost flawlessly in color and texture to create a single image. The cinematic figures are sculpted from polystyrene while the backgrounds are made from traditional painting techniques. Via his artist statement:

Shintaro Ohata is an artist who depicts little things in everyday life like scenes of a movie and captures all sorts of light in his work with a unique touch: convenience stores at night, city roads on rainy day and fast-food shops at dawn etc. His paintings show us ordinary sceneries as dramas. He is also known for his characteristic style; placing sculptures in front of paintings, and shows them as one work, a combination of 2-D and 3-D world. He says that it all started from when he wondered “I could bring the atmosphere or dynamism of my paintings with a more different way if I place sculptures in front of paintings”. Many viewers tend to assume that there is a light source set into his work itself because of the strong expression of lights in his sculpture.

Ohata will have work later this year at the Akita Museum of Modern Art, and you can see much more of his work online here. (via toxel)

 

 



Art

The Invisible Man: Artist Liu Bolin Hides in Plain Sight

January 17, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Artist and camouflage extraordinaire Liu Bolin just opened a new exhibition at Galerie Paris-Beijing in Paris featuring a number of new works that depict the artist perfectly hidden amongst urban backdrops. Remarkably the effect is achieved without the use of special effects or Photoshop, rather Bolin is painstakingly painted head-to-toe by a group of assistants using photographs of the area behind him as a guide. “My intention was not to disappear in the environment but instead to let the environment take possession of me”, he says. Bolin’s intent is not to simply hide himself as an individual but suggests the works are statement regarding damage caused by economic and urban development. The show runs through March 10th. (via designboom)

 

 



Photography

Something About these Objects is Not as it Seems: New Anamorphic Illusions by Brusspup

November 28, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Master of optical illusion Brusspup has a new video out today showing some really fun optical illusions using anamorphic projections. The trick is pretty simple: the photographs are skewed but then filmed at an angle where everything looks normal, but when the illusion is revealed it’s still pretty mind-bending. Brasspup also provided downloadable high resolution files of the Rubik’s cube, shoe, and tape so you can print them out on 8×11″ paper, trim, and try for yourself.

 

 

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