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Posts tagged
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Art

Laurie Frick: A fine line between art and neuroscience

March 16, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Artist Laurie Frick describes her work as being a fine line between art and neuroscience. Using aggregate data gathered from nightly EEG activity as a starting point she creates visual patterns and rhythms which are transformed into sprawling grids of cardboard, wood, and paper magazine fragments.

Formerly an executive in high-technology, she also holds an MBA from the University of Southern California. Using her background in engineering and high-technology she explores science, compulsive organization and the current culture of continual partial attention. The body of work for her upcoming show at Edward Cella Art & Architecture are experiments in rhythm using time studies of daily activity logs and sleep charts. Capturing the way we slice our time, waking and sleeping reflects a familiar human rhythm and replays something inherently unnoticed back into the physical world. […] All are built from modest materials that look and feel familiar and hold a sensibility of time. Materials register with familiar texture we’ve all touched and experienced. Recycled cardboard, hand towels, junk mail, gallery cards, old paper-back book covers, and in this exhibition found wood eyeglass trays from an old warehouse in Omaha, Nebraska.

See more of Laurie’s work now at Edward Cella Art + Architecture in Los Angeles through April 2.

 

 



Design

Paper Letters

March 11, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Letters cut from paper by Jerome Coriger. (via quipsologies)

 

 



Illustration

Christina Empedocles

March 7, 2011

Christopher Jobson

New work from Christina Empedocles who was born and raised in Ann Arbor, Michigan. Empedocle eventually graduated from Oberlin College to become a geologist in San Francisco and then got an MFA in painting from California College of the Arts in 2008.

By folding and cutting images, using sculpture, painting and collage, she records personal moments and impressions, enhanced by the ephemera of everyday. Her work is the result of hours of looking – contrasting the nostalgic fantasy of idealized memory and the intense focus of the realistic image.

See more of her work at David B. Smith Gallery.

 

 



Art

Alida Sayer

March 2, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Alida Rosie Sayer graduated from Glasgow School of Art in 2009 and by the following year had her first solo exhibition. Layering hundreds of carefully sliced screen prints, Sayer creates three-dimensional typographic forms in this series entitled There is no why using quotes from Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five.

The series of seven three-dimensional typographic illustrations were shown in their entirety at a solo exhibition titled ‘There is no why’ at Marsden Woo Project Space, Marsden Woo Gallery (London) in June – July 2010. Each piece has been made without any digital processes: every sheet printed using traditional techniques, such as letterpress or screen-printing, and cut or constructed completely by hand.

Really incredible stuff. See also her beautifully sculpted atlas. All images copyright Alida Sayer. (via it’s nice that)

 

 



Design

Paper Birds by Andy Singleton

March 1, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Wonderfully crafted paper birds by artist and illustrator Andy Singleton as part of a commission from the Crafts Council that will be unveiled March 10. (via quipsologies)

Update: See the completed project here.

 

 



Art Design

Michael Hansmeyer: A cardboard column with 16 million facets

February 28, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Zurich-based Michael Hansmeyer is a computational architect who examines the use of algorithms and computation to generate architectural forms. His latest project, Subdivided Columns – A New Order is a 9-foot column that weighs nearly 2,000 pounds generated by iterating a subdivision algorithm and then utilizing a laser to delicately slice each segment of cardboard. Via his web site:

A full-scale, 2.7-meter high variant of the columns is fabricated as a layered model using 1mm sheet. Each sheet is individually cut using a mill or laser. Sheets are stacked and held together by poles that run through a common core.

The calculation of the cutting path for each sheet takes place in several steps. First, the six million faces of the 3D model are intersected with a plane representing the sheet. This step generates a series of individual line segments that are tested for self-intersection and subsequently combined to form polygons. Next, a polygon-in-polygon test deletes interior polygons. A series of filters then ensures that convex polygons with peninsulas maintain a mininimum isthmus width. In a final step, an interior offset is calculated with the aim of hollowing out the slice to reduce weight.

To see more check out the article on Fastco. (thnx, chase!)

 

 



Art

Still Life Comes Alive

February 26, 2011

Christopher Jobson

An enormous typographic installation using thousands of paper components by Kyosuke Nishida and Brian Li. The work was exhibited in the FOFA Gallery hallway-vitrine for the Concordia University Design Department End of Year exhibition, during the Montréal Design Portes Ouvertes 2010. View the entire project here. (via type goodness)