photorealism

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with photorealism



Art

Stunning Photo-Realistic Graphite Drawings by Monica Lee

July 21, 2014

Johnny Waldman

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Malaysian artist Monica Lee is obsessed with details. But then again, I guess you have to be in order to create some of the most stunning photo-realistic drawings we’ve ever seen. “I like to challenge myself with complex portraits especially people with freckles or beard,” says Lee, who often works from photographic portraits to create seemingly identical drawings. Surprisingly, Lee worked in the digital world for 12 years before making the jump to illustration. But it certainly doesn’t show. She now spends 3-4 weeks on a single drawing. The artist attributes her love for hyperrealism to her father, who worked in the field of photography. You can follow Monica Lee on Facebook or Instagram. (via Illusion, IGNANT)

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left: the girl with glasses by Marteline Nystad | right: Monica Lee’s illustration of the photograph

 

 



Art Illustration

New Photorealistic Illustration Videos of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi

June 30, 2014

Christopher Jobson

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Since we last visited with Italian illustrator and graphic designer Marcello Barenghi last year, his wildly popular YouTube channel has gone into overdrive with a new photorealistic drawing tutorial almost every week. From soda cans and body parts to games and insects, he skillfully renders each piece using colored pencils and markers resulting a final object that looks like it could be grabbed right off the page. See more of his 150+ drawings right here.

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Art

Photorealistic Color Drawings of Everyday Objects by Marcello Barenghi

September 11, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Italian artist Marcello Barenghi draws incredibly realistic everyday objects that appear almost three dimensional with the help of colored pencils and occasional enhancements using markers or watercolor. Each work appears ever so slightly stylized which I think sets these apart from similar hyperrealistic drawings that are meant to ‘trick’ a viewer. If you want to see more, Barenghi runs a YouTube channel where he documents the process of almost every drawing. (via 2headedsnake)

 

 



Illustration

Digital Artworks by Adam Martinakis Explore Photo Realistic Surrealism

May 12, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Digital artist Adam Martinakis (previously) was born Poland in 1972 and currently lives and works in in Cannock, UK. His computer-generated artworks employ aspects of photorealism and surrealism to explore the human condition which he says results in a “mixture of post-fantasy futurism and abstract symbolism”. Above are a handful of works from the last year or so, several of which were on view at The Lloyd Gill Gallery through last week as part of a group show titled Metaphysical Objectivity in Comparison to Realism. You can see much more here.

 

 



Art

Realistic Urban Landscape Paintings of Chicago and New York by Nathan Walsh

April 4, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Many painters working from photographic source material employ a wide variety of techniques to arrive at a final image. This will involve anything from loose sketching beforehand to complex grids, where a photograph is translated into paint box by box. Such is not the case with British painter Nathan Walsh who instead relies on elaborate drawings reminiscent of architectural blueprints before every committing paint to canvas. This deep reverence for the underpinning geometry and perspective gives each work a sense of life that might otherwise not be present in something created with the mechanical aid of a camera or software.

Walsh tells me his primary source materials are not photographs but pencil sketches drawn on-site, for example the Chicago pieces above began from over 100 drawings he then references in his studio. In this way he can easily alter the position and size of any particular element, a process he likens to “building a world from scratch”. Personally I think the process is more akin to building the entire world in his mind so he can better represent it later in his paintings, each of which takes up to 3-4 months to complete. Via his website:

I deal exclusively with the urban landscape and aim to present a painted world which in some ways resembles the world we live in. I am fascinated by the city, it’s visual complexity and constant state of flux. The act of painting is an attempt fix this information and give vision to our experience of living within it. […] The work aims to create credible and convincing space which whilst making reference to our world displays it’s own distinct logic. This space is created through drawing, which I see as fundamental in establishing a world the viewer can engage with. Drawing allows me to make human pictorial decisions instead of relying on the mechanical eye of a camera or software package. This process is open ended and changes from one painting to the next. Whilst I employ a variety of perspectival strategies, these methods are not fixed or rigid in their application. Working with a box of pencils and an eraser I will start by establishing an horizon line on which I will place vanishing points to construct simple linear shapes which become subdivided into more complex arrangements.

You can see numerous final works at a much higher resolution, as well as initial drawings over on his website. Walsh will have work at the Changing Perspectives technology conference in Paris later this month, and is working on a solo show at Bernarducci Meisel Gallery in November.

 

 



Art

Amazing Color Pencil Portrait by Amy Robins

November 13, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Based on a photograph from Benoit Paille (previously) artist Amy Robins drew this impressive portrait using little more than colored pencils, cartridge paper, and quite a bit of talent. Although there’s just enough style to differentiate the image from a photograph it made me do a double-take. If you liked this also check out the work of Sam Silva.