planets

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Design Illustration Science

The Chart of Cosmic Exploration Elegantly Details 56 Years of Human Adventures into Space

March 10, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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We’ve long been fans of the data-rich illustrations produced by Pop Chart Lab, and this new print is no exception. The Chart of Cosmic Exploration documents every exploratory endeavor into space spanning Luna 2 in 1959 to DSCOVR in 2015. The elegantly dense chart not only depicts the flight paths and orbits around planets, moons, comets, and asteroids, but also takes pains to illustrate some 100 exploratory instruments. The result is a shockingly clear overview of an immensely complex topic. The print is now available for preorder and begins shipping next week. (via Mental_Floss)

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Food Photography

Fictional Images of the Universe Made From Scanning Household Items and Food by Navid Baraty

March 10, 2015

Johnny Waldman

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Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Moons – bottom of a glass containing coconut milk, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder, tums

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Black hole – bottom of a glass of coffee, salt, sugar, corn starch, cinnamon

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Planet – bottom of a glass containing half and half, water, food coloring. Stars – salt, cinnamon, baking powder

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Nebula – makeup, olive oil, chalk, baby powder, salt, water

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Nebula with gas streams – cat fur, garlic powder, salt, flour, cumin, turmeric

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Distant galaxy – olive oil, sesame oil, water, cumin, cinnamon, flour

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Spiral galaxy – baking soda, curry powder, chalk, salt, sugar, cinnamon

Have you ever left the lid of a scanner open to find that the background of your image was rendered black instead of white? That, essentially, was the impetus behind photographer Navid Baraty’s latest project WANDER Space Probe. Using an Epson photo scanner, Baraty carefully positions various household items, many of which are edible, on the document table.

Cooking ingredients like baking soda, sugar and cinnamon act as distant stars and nebulas while glasses containing milk, water and food coloring create the planets. Once everything is aligned properly Baraty hits the scan button. The photographer describes his project as “Cosmic explorations of an imaginary space probe.” You can follow Baraty’s fictional space probe and its adventures into depths of the unknown on Facebook and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

 

 



Design Food

Planetary Structural Layer Cakes Designed by Cakecrumbs

August 1, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Self-taught chef Rhiannon over at Cakecrumbs has been working on a fun series of planetary cakes that are designed to be scientifically accurate with different types of cake representing various layers within Earth and Jupiter. For her Jupiter Cake the center is the theoretical rock/ice core (mudcake), followed by a layer of liquid metallic hydrogen (almond butter), and finally the liquid molecular hydrogen (colored vanilla). She layered her Earth Cake similarly and finished it off with some absurdly detailed continent design made with marshmallow fondant.

Due to high demand she just posted an extremely detailed tutorial including a video that explains how to make spherical concentric layer cakes. Which is now a thing. That I will have at my birthdays now and forever. (via I F’ing Love Science)

 

 



Photography

Photographer Jason Tozer Turns Soap Bubbles into Mysterious, Colorful Planets

November 12, 2012

Christopher Jobson

All images courtesy the artist

No these aren’t incredible new high-resolution photographs of newly discovered rainbow worlds beamed back from Hubble, they’re just soap bubbles captured by photographer Jason Tozer in his London studio. Armed with a Hasselblad camera and a 135mm lens, Tozer has developed a his lighting technique that requires a giant dome of perspex to illuminate the reflective surface of each bubble. The more patterned surfaces on the bubbles are manipulated with a straw to create the various swirls and textures that might as well be the surface of Jupiter or Neptune. You can explore his website to see a few more photos, several of which have a fancy zoom feature giving you the full macro effect, he’s also done similar work with smoke and ice.

 

 

 



Art Photography

Miniature Worlds Digitally Assembled from Hundreds of Photographs by Catherine Nelson

October 11, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Sydney-based artist Catherine Nelson refers to herself as a painter with a camera, in that she doesn’t see the world as a photographer does but instead uses photos as a medium with which she creates these fantastic miniature worlds. Each work is comprised of hundreds of photographs which she digitally stitches together, drawing from an extensive background in visual special effects having worked on such films as Moulin Rouge, Harry Potter and 300. Of her work Nelson says:

When I embraced the medium of photography, I felt that taking a picture that represented only what was within the frame of the lens wasn’t expressing my personal and inner experience of the world around me. With the eye and training of a painter and with years of experience behind me in film visual effects, I began to take my photos to another level. The ‘Future Memories’ series comprises of 20 floating worlds, meticulously composed with thousands of assembled details. Visual poetry, nature photography and digital techniques blend together to give shape to these transcendental landscapes. The result is a contemporary pictorial mythology that subtly reminds the viewer of a profound truth: that it is in the flourishing variety of the local that the fate of the world resides.

Although the pieces are quite gorgeous to look at right here on Colossal, it’s hard to convey the resolution and scale of each piece which measures about 40×40″ (100x100cm), a level of detail that requires Nelson to spend nearly a month on each piece. It was my assumption based on the perspective and detail that some of these works must be somehow partially rendered in 3D, however she assured me via email that this is not the case. Though she uses digital editing to assemble them, they are almost purely based in photography. Incredible.

Nelson had several pieces on display earlier this month at fotofever in Brussels and will have work later this year at Gallery NOW in Seoul and at CONTEXT in Miami. You can see much more of her work at Galerie Paris-Beijing.

 

 

 

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