playgrounds

Posts tagged
with playgrounds



Design

Ridiculously Imaginative Playgrounds by Monstrum

April 26, 2012

Christopher Jobson

Danish firm Monstrum, founded by Ole B. Nielsen and Christian Jensen, are responsible for some of the most brilliant playscapes I’ve ever seen. From life-size blue whales, giant serpents, and wobbly castles, any one of these would have been my dream come true as a child. See many more examples in their project gallery. (via super punch)

 

 



Design

Treeless Treehouse

October 12, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The Treeless Treehouse is a cantilevered, inverted octagonal cone treehouse designed by Roderick Romero and constructed in less than two weeks with the help of Ian Weedman, and Jeff Casper. Via email Jeff writes:

The “treeless treehouse” was built high on a hillside site in Bel Air, California. The location lacked trees mature enough to support a structure of this magnitude, so this cantilevered, inverted octagonal cone of wood was anchored into a deep, cubical-shaped concrete foundation. A twisting tornado of Forest Stewardship Council (F.S.C.) certified mixed-species reclaimed Brazilian hardwoods were milled, pre-drilled & mounted around a burly framework of reclaimed vintage Douglas Fir beams. The entrance to this elevated observatory is accessed through a hidden opening in the west facing side of this chaotic, angularly wrapped nest.

I grew up in the Texas hill country amongst similar treehouse-challenged terrain and would have killed to have such an incredible structure. Here’s a video of some additional construction shots. If you liked this also check out the Knit Fort. Thanks to John Casper for the photos! (via core77)

 

 



Design

Double Happiness Billboard Swing Set

March 18, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Architect Didier Faustino created this epic swing set out of a converted advertising billboard for the Shenzhen-Hong Kong Bi-City Biennial of Urbanism and Architecture.

Double Happiness responds to the society of materialism where individual desires seem to be prevailing over all. This nomad piece of urban furniture allows the reactivation of different public spaces and enables inhabitants to reappropriate fragments of their city. They will both escape and dominate public space through a game of equilibrium and desequilibrium. By playing this “risky” game, and testing their own limits, two persons can experience together a new perception of space and recover an awareness of the physical world.

(via brokencitylab)

 

 



Art

Dietrich Wegner

February 28, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Smoke plume tree houses and homes on stilts by artist Dietrich Wegner. (via booooooom)

 

 



Design

The Knit Fort: A Flexible Playspace

February 4, 2011

Christopher Jobson

When I was a kid we were lucky to have a stick, an old car tire, and and on a really good day maybe some mud. There’s certainly nothing wrong with that, and there’s nothing wrong with this incredible play structure, either. The Knit Fort is a gorgeous playspace created by Matt Ganon Studio. The carefully interlinked walls allow for a flexible, organic form that can be pushed and pulled to create new shapes and spaces.

The assembly technique, similar to knitting, allows the addition or subtraction of columns responding to the site context without altering the design. Depending on the scale, the surface can remain elastic allowing the occupant to manipulate and deform the profile. The shape can be expanded or contracted to alter the apertures of the space. The participatory aspect of the surface prolongs the process of creation and allows fine tuning the boundary of the space.

If I was a kid this would cease being a fort and quickly become a permanent residence. (via ok great)

 

 



Design

The world’s first Puckelball Pitch in Malmö, Sweden

January 25, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Is Dr. Seuss still alive, hiding out in Sweden, working as an urban planner? Not quite. The puckelball pitch made of artificial turf is a design concept by artist Johan Strom, who created this field in Malmö, Sweden as a metaphor for life:

“Many live under the belief that life is a fair playing field, that both pitch halves are just as big and the goal always has at least one cross. But ultimately the ball never bounces exactly where you want it to and the pitch is both bumpy and uneven.”

The rolling landscape of the field is meant to inspire imaginative play and to encourage fair competition between skilled and unskilled players, young and old, boys and girls. It was nominated in the Making Space 2010 competition that gives prizes to the best architectural and designed spaces for children. Every city in the world should be lucky enough to have a field like this. (via playscapes)