printers

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Art Design

The Human Printer: CMYK Halftone Prints Recreated by Hand

April 18, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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The Human Printer is an ongoing art project by Stinsensqueeze (STSQ) who take photographs and manually create a CMYK halftone printing effect by hand. CMYK refers to the four inks used in some color printing: cyan, magenta, yellow, and key (black)—the application of which is usually determined by computers, not people. The process of applying each dot by hand as you can imagine is a painfully tedious process that requires not only a knowledge of printing but also plenty of forethought before beginning each piece. You can see a rough idea of the process in the video above.

The Human Printer was setup in 2009 by Louise Naunton Morgan and having setup a design studio with Stina Gromark, the project is now run by Stinsensqueeze (STSQ). According to their website they are currently taking orders, all you have to do is upload an image that meets their requirements, select a color process, and they’ll get back to you with a quote. (via jeannie jeannie)

 

 



Design

Markus Kayser Builds a Solar-Powered 3D Printer that Prints Glass from Sand and a Sun-Powered Cutter

June 24, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Industrial designer and tinkerer Markus Kayser spent the better part of a year building and experimenting with two fantastic devices that harness the sun’s power in some of the world’s harshest climates. The first he calls a Sun Cutter, a low-tech light cutter that uses a large ball lens to focus the sun’s rays onto a surface that’s moved by a cam-guided system. As the surface moves under the magnified light it cuts 2D components like a laser. The project was tested for the first time in August 2010 in the Egyptian desert and Kayser used thin plywood to create the parts for a few pairs of pretty sweet shades. But he didn’t stop there.

Next, Kayser began to examine the process of 3D printing. Merging two of the deserts most abundant resources, nearly unlimited quantities of sand and sun, he created the Solar Sinter, a device that melts sand to create 3D objects out of glass. Via his web site:

This process of converting a powdery substance via a heating process into a solid form is known as sintering and has in recent years become a central process in design prototyping known as 3D printing or SLS (selective laser sintering). […] By using the sun’s rays instead of a laser and sand instead of resins, I had the basis of an entirely new solar-powered machine and production process for making glass objects that taps into the abundant supplies of sun and sand to be found in the deserts of the world.

In mid-May the Solar Sinter was tested for a two week period in the deserts of Siwa, Egypt, resulting in the amazing footage above. It’s incredible to think that the solar energy generated for both machines is used only to power electronics, servos and the mechanism that tracks the sun, while the power used to cut wood and melt sand is just raw, concentrated sunlight. While I fully understand the mechanics and science at work in Kayser’s devices, there’s something about them that just seems magical. Definitely head over to his website to explore more photos and info. (via stellar, sorry can’t link the post for some reason)

 

 



Design Food

Winner Winner 3D Dinner

March 8, 2011

Christopher Jobson

The space shuttle pictured above made from ground scallops and cheese is part of a unique collaboration between NYC-based French Culinary Institute and [email protected] at Cornell University. [email protected] is an open-source project that aims to produce a consumer-friendly 3D printer that would give anyone the ability to quickly create small object with the click of the mouse. Taking the idea one step further the culinary institute is adapting the printers to print food. Edible pastes are squirted through nozzles, layering texture upon texture to create snack-sized objects. See a larger gallery here.

 

 



Art

Just in Time: Xavier Antin’s chain-linked printers

January 12, 2011

Christopher Jobson

London-based artist Xavier Antin devised this beautifully orchestrated printing process to create his book “Just in Time, or A Short History of Production”. While I don’t think the paper was physically fed through all four printers at once, each printer was responsible for a color plate starting with an 1880 stencil duplicator printing magenta and ending with 1976 inkjet printer for yellow. (via beautiful decay)

 

 



Design Science

Life Imitates Darkman and the 3D Skin Printer is Born

November 2, 2010

Christopher Jobson

OK so it doesn’t actually print the face of Liam Neeson (yet), but researchers at Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine have successfully tested a bioprinter that outputs living skins cells directly onto burn wounds.

It acts just like your home printer, right down to the inkjet valve and vials of skin-cell “ink” that it sprays onto a wound. The printed skin graft consists of two separate layers — one is a mixture of skin cells with fibrinogen and Type I collagen (which each help with blood clotting and scar tissue formation, respectively); the second layer is thrombin, another clotting agent. The whole mixture has “a consistency similar to jello — so that [it] will adhere to the wound,” say the researchers.

Head over to FastCo for more.

 

 



Design

A Foam Printer That Produces Floating Designs

September 15, 2010

Christopher Jobson

How is this even possible? I have no idea. It’s printer witchcraft as far as I’m concerned. But I’m still renting one for my birthday.