process

Posts tagged
with process



Art

Meg Hitchcock

April 5, 2011

Christopher Jobson

(click for detail)

Brooklyn-based artist Meg Hitchock dissects religious texts such as the Bible, Koran, and Torah and uses the individual letters to create maddeningly complex, interwoven collages of typography. Via her artist statement:

In my series Mantras & Meditations, I examine and deconstruct the word of God as interpreted through the world religions. I select passages from holy books and cut the letters from one passage to form the text of another. For example, I may cut up a passage from the Old Testament of the Bible and reassemble it as a passage from the Bhagavad Gita, or I may use type from the Torah to recreate an ancient Tantric text. A continuous line of text forms the words and sentences in a run-on manner, without spaces or punctuation, creating a visual mantra of devotion.

In her most recent work at Famous Accountants Hitchcock spent 135 hours transcribing (gluing tens of thousands of letters, ahem) the entire Book of Revelation, the last book of the Christian New Testament, but with text cut out from an English translation of the Koran. And if 135 hours seems like a lot, she began cutting the individual letters for the installation almost six months before its opening. The text ran across gallery walls and floors like an endless rope of words. See video of that piece as well as a brief interview here:

I can’t decide if I’m more impressed with her artwork or simply what must be her incredible patience. See more of her work here. (via hyperallergic)

 

 



Art

Annie Vought

April 3, 2011

Christopher Jobson

(click images for detail)

New work from artist Annie Vought who delicately cuts away the white space from handwritten letters and scribbles. It seems her work has increased dramatically in its scale and complexity since I posted about her last year. See her work at Unspeakable Projects in San Francisco as part of her joint show “You Are A Bitch” with Hannah Ireland through April 21.

 

 



Art

Immense paper cut tapestries by Tomoko Shioyasu

March 18, 2011

Christopher Jobson


(click for detail)

Japanese artist Tomoko Shioyasu was born in Osaka in 1981 and majored in sculpture at the Kyoto City University of Arts. Her immense floor-to-ceiling tapestries are meticulously cut by hand from enormous sheets of paper using utility knives and soldering irons. Her work evokes some of nature’s most complex creations: the organic patterns of cells, the flow of water, and the forces of wind. How these are hung without tearing seems nearly impossible.

Her latest work, “Vortex” (first two images) is currently on display as part of the show Bye Bye Kitty!!! Between Heaven and Hell in Japanese Art at Japan Society in New York which opened today and runs through June 12. 50% of all proceeds from ticket sales to Japan Society programming including this show are being donated to relief efforts in Japan right now. Here’s a quick video about it:

(via hyperallergic, photos via karrie jacobs, kashya hildebrand, and scai bathhouse)

 

 



Design

Martin Pyper: Pins and Needles

February 21, 2011

Christopher Jobson

I’m thrilled to share the work of graphic designer Martin Pyper with you. Martin runs a small, award-winning design studio in Amsterdam called mestudio where design, craft, and time-consuming repetition converge to create incredible typographic layouts. I couldn’t imagine how much time these projects consume so I shot a quick email to Martin. As it turns out some work like the “Frontiers of Reality” stop motion clip can take up to a week to complete (though he had to repeat it at a larger scale), while he was able to do the “Boring” type using hundreds of steel pins in just two days.

The fact that it is all so time consuming is precisely the point; it is a perfect antidote to the crazy deadlines and usual design work I do sitting behind the Mac, this stuff slows me down, makes me think about materials, the structure, feeling and way type works in the real physical world, back to the roots of typography before the digital age, but also combined with the digital age.

Pyper’s work isn’t limited to kite string and steel pins though. He has also chosen as a medium sugar cubes, playing cards, and laser-cut paper. Thanks for sharing Martin!

 

 



Art Photography

Photocopied Walls

February 5, 2011

Christopher Jobson

An installation by Andrea Mastrovito using 3,307 individual black and white photocopies that were pieced together to create the view outside the gallery walls. Incredible. (thnx, chelsea!)