rocks

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Art

Found Stones Peer Back at Viewers with Painted Eyes

June 11, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Australian painter Jennifer Allnutt focuses on portraits in her art practice, and most of her subjects are shown from the tops of their heads down to their collarbones. But one of Allnutt’s series defies the norms of bust portraiture. Her ocular rocks feature extremely realistic renderings of eyes. On some of her larger rocks, Allnutt completely envelops each eye with a lid, lashes, and skin. But on many of her smaller pieces, the eye is incomplete, running off the edge of the stone and giving the sense that it is a fragment of a complete face. The artist sometimes returns the painted rocks to the places she found them to surprise passersby.

Allnutt studied Visual Arts at the University of South Australia and most recently exhibited her work at Marfa Gallery in Melbourne. You can see more of her paintings on Instagram and Facebook. (via designboom)

 

 



Photography

Balloons Precariously Compressed Between Marble Slabs in Photo Series by Daniel Forero

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In art director and photographer Daniel Forero’s most recent series Air, slabs of marble trap, compress, and squish inflated balloons. The series was inspired by the shapes and colors of stones that compose the buildings in his new home of Paris. Forero wanted to focus on the ways that architectural materials create beauty through balance, and decided to create scenes that would emphasize the stone’s weight.

“The sculptures create tension, but at the same time harmony,” Forero explains to Colossal. “It was difficult to put the objects together in a natural way without any help from other objects. There were a lot of failures in the process, but once the objects ‘fit’ they stood still in perfect balance for several days until I removed them from my table.” You can see more of Forero’s compositions on his website, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 



Art

James Brunt Organizes Leaves and Rocks Into Elaborate Cairns and Mandalas

February 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

James Brunt creates elaborate ephemeral artworks using the natural materials he finds in forests, parks, and beaches near his home in Yorkshire, England. This form of land art, popularized and often associated with fellow Brit Andy Goldsworthy, involves detailed patterns, textures, and shapes formed using multiples of one kind of material. Brunt collects twigs, rocks, and leaves and arranges them in mandala-like spirals and concentric circles. He photographs his finished work to document it before nature once again takes hold of his materials. The artist frequently shares updates via Twitter and Facebook where he sometimes invites the public to join him as he works. Brunt also offers prints of his photographed artworks on his website.

  

 

 



Art

Beetle Sculptures Encrusted with Minerals by Nozomi

October 15, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Paris-based artist Nozomi created these glistening beetle specimens through a process of digital sculpting, 3d printing, and good old-fashioned lacquer painting. The works are a continuation of an ongoing series where she explores the backs of beetles as a backdrop for her ditigal work. Nozomi is selling a few of the pieces on Etsy and you can follow her on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Crystalline Artworks Grow from Cracks in Urban Walls by Paige Smith

September 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Paige Smith A.K.A. A Common Name (previously here and here) has been filling the gaps, cracks, and corners of LA with hand folded paper crystals since 2012. Her Urban Geodes are painted in bright purple, pink, and other jewel tones. They are most commonly inserted into areas that are crumbling or could use a bit more care, allowing Smith to patch holes with art instead of a monotone spackle.

“Geodes are formations made and found in nature and my process of using manmade materials and placing them in major cities concurrently signals the tension between nature and industry and celebrates the beauty of urban space,” says Smith in an artist statement about the project. “My work is infused with a magical realism that encourages us to pause, to discover, to be present and to find beauty in the mundane.”

Similar to the Atlanta-based project Tiny Doors ATL, each of Smith’s installations are mapped on her website for easy finding. In addition to LA, Smith has also installed works in Philadelphia, San Francisco, Dubai, Madrid, Bali, and Istanbul. You can see more of her crystalline interventions on her Instagram.

 

 



Art

River Stones with Pouches Unzip to Reveal Hidden Scenes and Objects

July 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Japanese artist Hirotoshi Ito’s sculptural works are a surreal contradiction of materials that seemingly shouldn’t exist, and yet here they are. The smooth stones of variable shape and size are each embedded with zippers that open to reveal hidden objects like collections of coins or marbles, while some of his more popular works incorporate a rather sinister toothy mouth. Ito finds the rocks in a riverbed near his home and works with the natural shape of each object to form the pouch and scene inside.

Ito had a solo show last month at Little High Gallery in Tokyo called “Mysterious Stone!” and you can see more of his ongoing stone carving work on Facebook. (via Geyser of Awesome)

 

 



Art

Rock Sculptures Suspended Within Bell Jars by Their Own Weight by Dan Grayber

June 19, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Cavity Mechanism #12 w/ Glass Dome. 2013. Mixed. 23″ x 13″ x 13″. All images via Dan Grayber.

Dan Grayber‘s works exist at the intersection of sculpture and physics, pieces carefully designed to solve the problems created by their own existence. The sculptures each include a rock suspended within a glass enclosure, the rock’s weight perfectly balanced by the mechanisms, systems, and pulleys that surround it.

Grayber relates this play of tension and balance to personal relationships, which serves as another influence to his work outside of visual interests in industrial design, construction machinery, and the children’s game Cat’s Cradle.

Cavity Mechanism #6, from 2009, [seen below] is one of the most obvious pieces to speak about interpersonal relationships that I’ve made,” said Grayber to Venison Magazine. “There are two identical mechanisms inside of a glass display dome, and one small cable that runs between the two mechanisms. This cable holds all of the tension between the two mechanisms, and they both need to remain in place to maintain the tension. I was really thinking about co-dependence when I made the piece. If either mechanism were to slip, or the connection between them to break, it would cause both to fail.”

You can see more of Grayber’s experiments in equilibrium on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Boing Boing and Makezine)

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13" x 14" x 14".

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13″ x 14″ x 14″

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5" x 6.5" x 6.5".

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5″ x 6.5″ x 6.5″

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11″ x 5″ x 5″

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5″ x 5″ x 5″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5" x 12" x 12".

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5″ x 12″ x 12″

 

 

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