rocks

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Art

Granite and Quartz Stones Are Carved to Appear Like Fabric and Clay by José Manuel Castro López

October 26, 2020

Christopher Jobson

All photos © José Manuel Castro López.

Spanish artist José Manuel Castro López (previously) transforms nondescript chunks of granite and quartz into squished and dough-like objects, as if each object morphed from solid to liquid and back again in the sculptor’s capable hands. López seems to delight in convincing the viewer that he works with stone as if it were clay. Lately, he’s begun to introduce additional objects that seem to stitch, clamp, or stretch the stones in various ways. While the pieces are obviously not as complex as a Bernini or Michelangelo, they do function as unusual and often humorous studies of various stone carving techniques. You can explore a steady stream of work old and new on his Facebook timeline. (via My Modern Met)

 

 

 



Photography

Moody Photographs by Jan Erik Waider Capture the Rocky Terrain of Icelandic Landscapes

October 1, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Jan Erik Waider, shared with permission

Based in Hamburg, Germany, Jan Erik Waider (previously) frequently travels across Europe to photograph the rocky landscapes and textured terrains of locales like Stuðlagil canyon and Iceland’s sandy shores. On a recent trip to the island country, Waider captured moody images of jagged, basalt-lined waters in four different locations, including Reynisdrangar, Stuðlagil, Kálfshamarsvík, and Gerðuberg. He shares with Colossal:

Not more than 20 million years ago, the island rose out of the sea due to volcanic activity on the ocean floor of the Atlantic Ocean. But even today the landscape is changing due to the constant volcanic activity. There are many places on the island with very bizarre-looking geological formations and I was especially interested in basalt, with its strict and geometric structure and volcanic origin. With the monochrome character of the series, I wanted to focus clearly on the rocks and also give the photos a slightly mysterious character.

Waider generously agreed to allow Colossal to share his photographs on our social media pages for the next few months. To follow his Nordic adventures, head to Instagram and Behance.

 

 

 

 



Food

Toast Slices Undergo Edible Makeovers into Rock Gardens, Pantone Swatches, and Flower Beds

April 29, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Manami Sasaki

While many of us slather our toast with butter day-after-day, Manami Sasaki is transforming thick slices of bread into Zen Japanese rock gardens and Pantone swatches that make breakfast into the most jubilant meal of the day. A watercolor artist turned toast connoisseur, the Japanese designer combines the stocks available in her fridge and pantry to assemble delightful bread-based creations.

In a patch of flowers, she adorns a tomato-sauce base with margarine petals and mint leaves that are finished with mustard details. Another dense slice is torn and reassembled with edible gold before being smothered in sour cream and garnished with ketchup to resemble Kintsugi, the Japanese art of pottery repair.

To see the latest in Sasaki’s delightful series of nourishments, follow her on Instagram. You also might like this candy garden. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

 

 



Animation Science

Fantastical Video Imagines the Crystalized Intricacies of Mineral Deposits

March 16, 2020

Grace Ebert

In an enchanting new video titled “Waiting to Be Found,” Dan Hoopert dives into the details within Earth’s minerals. The United Kingdom-based designer highlights the sprawling crystallization process as it expands within each deposit and alters its colors. One piece even grows a sparkling mass off its left side.

Hoopert’s project is based on a 2019 article in Earth, which states that the International Mineralogical Association recognizes more than 5,000 distinct minerals, including well-known silicates and carbonates that are frequently found in masses around the world. “Most are documented based on just a few known occurrences. It’s unlikely that scientists will stumble across many new finds of singularly abundant minerals on Earth, but numerous rare minerals are probably yet to be discovered,” the article says. In the last decade, about 1,000 new species were added to the association’s growing list.

The designer brought the project to life using 3D special effects software Houdini and Redshift. For more of his imaginary explorations of natural processes, follow him on Instagram and Behance.

All images © Dan Hoopert

 

 



Art

Found Stones Peer Back at Viewers with Painted Eyes

June 11, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Australian painter Jennifer Allnutt focuses on portraits in her art practice, and most of her subjects are shown from the tops of their heads down to their collarbones. But one of Allnutt’s series defies the norms of bust portraiture. Her ocular rocks feature extremely realistic renderings of eyes. On some of her larger rocks, Allnutt completely envelops each eye with a lid, lashes, and skin. But on many of her smaller pieces, the eye is incomplete, running off the edge of the stone and giving the sense that it is a fragment of a complete face. The artist sometimes returns the painted rocks to the places she found them to surprise passersby.

Allnutt studied Visual Arts at the University of South Australia and most recently exhibited her work at Marfa Gallery in Melbourne. You can see more of her paintings on Instagram and Facebook. (via designboom)

 

 



Photography

Balloons Precariously Compressed Between Marble Slabs in Photo Series by Daniel Forero

February 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In art director and photographer Daniel Forero’s most recent series Air, slabs of marble trap, compress, and squish inflated balloons. The series was inspired by the shapes and colors of stones that compose the buildings in his new home of Paris. Forero wanted to focus on the ways that architectural materials create beauty through balance, and decided to create scenes that would emphasize the stone’s weight.

“The sculptures create tension, but at the same time harmony,” Forero explains to Colossal. “It was difficult to put the objects together in a natural way without any help from other objects. There were a lot of failures in the process, but once the objects ‘fit’ they stood still in perfect balance for several days until I removed them from my table.” You can see more of Forero’s compositions on his website, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 

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