sculpture

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Art

Shattered Glass Animals by Marta Klonowska

February 7, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Using carefully broken shards of colored glass, Polish artist Marta Klonowska assembles translucent animals in life-like proportion and size. Almost all of her sculptures are based on animals found in baroque and romantic paintings by such artists as Peter Paul Rubens or Francisco de Goya next to which they are often displayed. Her work appeared most recently at European Glass Context 2012, and you can see many more images over on lorch + seidel contemporary. (via lustik)

 

 



Art

The Bizarre, Flexible Paper Sculptures of Li Hongbo

February 4, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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What at first look like delicate works of carved porcelain are actually thousands of layers of soft white paper, carved into busts, skulls, and human forms by Beijing artist Li Hongbo. A book editor and designer, the artist became fascinated by traditional Chinese toys and festive decorations known as paper gourds made from glued layers of thin paper which can be stored flat but then opened to reveal a flower or other shape. He applied the same honeycomb-like paper structure to much larger human forms resulting in these highly flexible sculptures. Hongbo recently had a solo show at Dominik Mersch Gallery in Australia who made the videos above, and you can see much more of his work on their website.

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Art

New Skeletons and Insects Carved from Common Inanimate Objects by Maskull Lasserre

January 29, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Montreal-based artist Maskull Lasserre (previously) recently completed a new body of work for an exhibition titled Fable at Centre Space gallery in Toronto that ran through January 19th. Lasserre is known for his incredible ability to carve anatomical forms of animals, people, insects and other forms out of inanimate objects such as doors, tables, pianos, and even instruments. In a two part interview with Liana Voia (part 1, part 2) the artist discusses the intent behind his work:

When the remnants of life are imposed on an object, and that’s true especially with the carving work that I do, it infers a past history or a previous life that had been lived, so again where people see my work as macabre, I often see it as hopeful, as the remnants of a life. Despite the fact that the life has ended, at least that life had a beginning and middle as well, so often by imparting these bodily elements to inanimate objects it reclaims or reanimates them in a virtual way.

The objects in Fable included a crow skeleton carved into a chair and axe, a vulture skull carved into two hand planes, a human ear carved into a violin and case, a rat carved into a door and rolling pin, and an incredible rhinoceros beetle taking flight from within an upright piano. You can learn more over on Center Space.

 

 



Art

Sketching with a Band Saw: James McNabb's Scrap Wood Cityscapes

January 22, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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For his MFA Thesis Exhibit last September, Pennsylvania artist James McNabb created a beautiful collection of architectural wonders using discarded wood. He describes his process as “sketching with a band saw,” and says initial intent was not to build skylines, but instead began with the creation of the individual wooden pieces which resembled tools or other strangely familiar objects. After he built nearly 250 of them in a day they collectively began to resemble a miniature city. You can see many more works from the exhibition on his website.

 

 



Art

Scott Carter's Sculptural Medium: Deconstructed Gallery Walls

January 21, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Before inviting Scott Carter to show in your exhibition space, be sure you’ve done your homework and have a stellar insurance policy, the Chicago artists’ medium of choice is drywall and wood cut directly from the walls of the gallery. Blurring the lines between sculpture and installation Carter first develops digital prototypes which he then translates into the myriad components needed to construct the furniture and other sculptures that comprise each exhibition. The eviscerated and ragged walls then form the backdrop to each piece like a curious set of physical blueprints, not unlike wooden insect skeleton models you might have played with as a kid. Scott currently has work at Beers.Lambert Gallery in London through January 26th and will have another solo show there in 2014. See much more of his work via his website (flash).

 

 



Art

The Skewed, Anamorphic Sculptures and Engineered Illusions of Jonty Hurwitz

January 21, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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Some figurative sculptors carve their artworks from unforgiving stone, while others carefully morph the human form from soft blocks of clay. Artist Jonty Hurwitz begins with over a billion computer calculations before spending months considering how to materialize his warped ideas using perspex, steel, resin, or copper.

Born in Johannesburg in 1969, Hurwitz now lives and works in London where he’s somewhat of a renaissance man, focusing both on his artwork and micro-loan website Wonga which he co-founded in 2007. His anamorphic sculptures rely on scans of objects (hands, faces, frogs) that are then distorted digitally and fabricated, but when placed in front of a cylindrical mirror the projected reflection reveals the original object. Still, other works deal with pixelated or sliced human forms that are only viewable from a single perspective. A scientist at heart, Hurwitz explained to me that his artwork is his way of “expressing calculations visually,” and also allows him to experiment with cutting-edge manufacturing and fabrication technologies. Of the more mind-bending anamorphic pieces, he shares:


For the anamorphic pieces its an algorithmic thing, distorting the original sculptures in 3D space using 2πr or πr3 (cubed). Much of it is mathematical, relying on processing power. There is also a lot of hand manipulation to make it all work properly too as spacial transformation have a subtle sweet spot which can only be found by eye. Generally I will 3D scan my subject in a lab and then work the model using Mathematica or a range of 3D software tools. I think the π factor is really important in these pieces. We all know about this irrational number but the anamorphic pieces really are a distortion of a “normal” sculpture onto an imaginary sphere with its centre at the heart of the cylinder.

I strongly urge you to watch the two embedded videos above to get a sense of how remarkably precise each artwork appears up close. What I’ve shown you here is honestly just the tip of the iceberg; please head on over to his website, Facebook, Saatchi profile, and Youtube to see more of his work. He’ll also have a piece on display at the Kinetica art show in London in February. The photography above was taken by Niina Keks, Otto Pierratto, Richard Ivey, Alex Brenner and Jonty Hurwitz and provided courtesy of the artist.

 

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