sculpture

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Art Craft Design

Malleable Paper Sculptures by Polly Verity Expand and Contract Into Mesmerizing Shapes

July 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

 

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Caterpilla Corrugation #Paperfold #corrugation #papiroflexia #paperengineering #origami

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Polly Verity (previously) has been experimenting with three-dimensional paper sculptures and intricate folds since the age of eight, when she was given a paper folding book by her step-grandfather. Instead of following an ancient origami tradition, Verity finds her inspiration in the more modern technique of abstract tessellations developed by Bauhaus experimentation in the 1920’s. Through the years she has focused primarily on repetitive abstract geometric patterns made with uncut pieces of white paper to allow her audience to focus on the works’ shapes rather than be distracted by her chosen color. In addition to small sculptures, Verity has also created one-wear-only dresses for weddings, performances, and photo shoots. You can see more of her repeated paper designs on Instagram.

 

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Art

Droopy Porcelain “Dust Furries” by Linda Lopez Accumulate Gold Dandruff

July 3, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Orderly appendages droop off Linda Nguyen Lopez’s ceramic “dusty furry” sculptures. Rendered in shades of pink, yellow, black, and ombre, the textured sculptures are designed to be viewed in the round. They sometimes include smaller particles (which Lopez refers to as “rocks” or “dandruff”) scattered across the surface, bringing to mind the object-accumulating video game Katamari Damacy. Lopez earned a BFA from California State University of Chico and a MFA from the University of Colorado at Boulder. She is represented by Mindy Solomon Gallery and her upcoming solo show at David B. Smith Gallery in Denver opens on August 16, 2019. See more from Lopez on Instagram and her website.

 

 



Art

Found Domestic Furniture Transformed Into Raw Architectural Models by Ted Lott

July 3, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Sculptor Ted Lott builds wooden artworks based on one of human beings’ most fundamental requirements, exploring the different ways in which we’ve devised shelter as a product of the industrial revolution. Lott examines modern architecture at its core by building tiny scale models without the decorative designs imposed by exterior siding and paint. He then combines these bare yet elegant structures with domestic furniture, fusing the basic necessities of home with the comforts provided from within.

To build his works, Lott uses a bandsaw as a scaled sawmill to generate miniature pieces of wood and other proportioned raw materials. Found and vintage furniture provide the base of his structures which are then lit from within as if someone is home.

“Like us, these structures are regular, nevertheless they strive to be unique, transforming their everyday bones into something beyond the banalities of basic needs,” Lott explains in his artist statement. “To me, this is the reason for making objects, to take the ordinary and make it extraordinary. Through this process we point to the complex interaction of necessity, artistry, economy, function and beauty present in the original objects, while highlighting the possibilities of transformation and growth that are a requirement for the continuation and evolution of life.”

Lott received his BFA from the Maine College of Art and an MFA from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. You can see more of the artist’s hybrid wooden works on his website and Instagram.

 

 

 

 

 



Art

Human-Bird Hybrid Sculptures by Calvin Ma Interpret Social Experiences

July 2, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“This Is Me Today”, all images courtesy of Calvin Ma

Sculptor Calvin Ma channels his experience of social anxiety into imaginative ceramic sculptures that fuse human characters with birds. The avian elements act as suits of armor, protecting the person from the outside world, and reflect Ma’s personality in fight or flight situations. Carefully articulated feathers cover the surface of each sculpture, from the mask-like bird headdresses to the arms and torso of the humanoid figure. In previous bodies of work, the artist has used houses as his metaphor with walls, windows, and chimneys forming the protective outer shell of each sculpture.

“I never really felt comfortable in my own skin in social settings, so I created these characters to help tell stories about it,” Ma tells Colossal. “Each piece is meant to act out a specific social anxiety related experience. I try not to get too dark or serious with the work and really try to have fun with it.”

The Bay Area-based artist has a two-person show with Erika Sanada (who is also married to Ma) at Sherrie Gallerie in Columbus, Ohio from July 28 to September 3, 2019, and a solo exhibition at Antler Gallery in Portland, Oregon opening on November 28. Alongside these shows, Ma will also be sharing pieces in at SOFA Expo in Chicago and at Haven Gallery in Long Island, in late October and mid-December, respectively. You can explore more of the artist’s sculptures on Instagram.

“Butterflies”

“In The Clouds”

“One Of The Crowd”

“Flight”

“Caught Up”

“Bloom”

“Take The Leap”

“Forager”

 

 



Art

Fantastical Mechanisms of Land and Sea Built from Cardboard and Hand-Blown Glass by Daniel Agdag

July 2, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

“The Latitudinal” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12″, all images provided by the artist

Australian sculptor and filmmaker Daniel Agdag (previously) builds fictionalized architectural objects that could find their home in the sky, on land, or under the sea. The cardboard, timber, and hand-blown glass structures are inspired by the hidden mechanics found in everyday industrial forms, and consist of miniature models of fans, gears, and pumps. Inflated balloons like The Southeasterly carry small ship-like vessels, and a 2018 work titled The Second State looks like an early roller coaster model complete with billboard-like signage that spells out the word “LUCKY.”

Agdag received a Master’s degree in Film and Television from the Victorian College of the Arts in 2007. His recent solo exhibition States wrapped at Messums in Wilshire on June 30, 2019, and selected sculptures from the exhibition will travel to the gallery’s London location from July 3 to 13, 2019. You can and see more of Agdag’s sculptural objects on his website and Instagram.

“The 2nd Tulip” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12” (L), “The Buoy” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12” (R)

“The Second State” (2018), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

Detail of “The Second State” (2018), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

“The 2nd Round Car” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12” 

Detail of “The Latitudinal” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

“The Southeasterly” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

The Southerly

Detail of the Southerly

“The Longitudinal” (2019), Cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23” x 12” x 12”

 

 



Art

A Massive Wooden Wave Surges From a Gallery Floor in an Installation by Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen

July 1, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

In a gallery at the Center for Maine Contemporary Art (CMCA) this spring, an all-encompassing wave of wood surrounded visitors as they walk across gangplanks that bisect the space. The installation, Hubris Atë Nemesis, was by Maine-based artist duo Wade Kavanaugh and Stephen B. Nguyen. Kavanaugh and Nguyen have been collaborating since 2005 and working exclusively with paper. “One of the foundations of our collaborative art practice is the act of shared seeing, the artists shared. “We find common ground by actively investigating our own visual reference points, memories and assumptions.”

For this installation, the artists pushed their practice to include new media and techniques: Hubris Atë Nemesis is their first piece in wood, and the first in which the pathway through the piece is an actual part of the installation. The artists explained in a statement that the title and concept of the work is derived from a three-part narrative arc common in Greek tragic plays:

Hubris, characterized as an arrogant confidence, transforms to Atë, a ruinous folly or madness, then ultimately to Nemesis, a force of retribution that resets the natural order. Like many paintings of the Maine coast, we hope this work captures a moment of suspense in a dynamic system—a snapshot with an uncertain future—and that it appears to be unwritten what the restored natural order should or might become.

Hubris Atë Nemesis was created with the support of the Ellis-Beauregard Foundation: Kavanaugh and Nguyen were selected from a blind jury of over two hundred applicants. The installation was on view through June 16, 2019 at the CMCA. If you did not get a chance to experience the work in person, an impressive 360° virtual tour by Dave Clough is available. You can explore more of Kavanaugh and Nguyen’s archive of monochromatic installations, like White Stag and The Experience of Green, on the duo’s website.

 

 

 



Art

Jen Stark Unveils Colorfully Vivid Portals Based on Scientific and Mathematical Concepts at Joshua Liner Gallery

June 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images courtesy of the artist and Joshua Liner Gallery

Los Angeles-based artist Jen Stark (previously) uses materials such as paper, wood, and metal to create optically-charged sculptures based on complex scientific and mathematic concepts. Layered colors with both smooth and warped edges create tunnels into the unknown, forming visual interpretations of ideas such as infinity, evolution, or sacred geometry. One wall piece by Stark lines up dozens of layers of brightly colored paper which are sliced to fold on top of each other in a descending order of size. Others hang from the ceiling, inviting observers to peer at the works from multiple angles, to understand its composition from beside, underneath, and between its layers.

Stark’s solo exhibition Dimensionality runs through July 19, 2019 at Joshua Liner Gallery in New York City. You can see more of her dizzying vortexes on her website and Instagram.