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Art

Traditional Textiles are Unraveled and Re-Woven in Installations by Aiko Tezuka

September 4, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Berlin-based Japanese artist Aiko Tezuka carefully unravels and re-weaves elaborate textiles to form new shapes and patterns. In some works, the separated threads hang from the bottom edge of an intact textile in perfectly parallel lines; others feature threads course down in waterfall-like sheaths, reconnecting as they crash into the floor. In still others, the loose threads come together to form images and words hovering on sheer substrates. Tezuka closely studies the cultural and economic histories interwoven in different Eastern and Western textile traditions, examining the greater symbolism embedded in each decorative element.

“My essential interest has been what makes up the surface of the object; through which processes was the surface produced; how could I peel off the surface; what things could I see behind the surface; and how could I embody these things behind the surface into my work,” Tezuka shares in an artist statement. “Although we are completely surrounded by surfaces, we cannot physically enter things in even one millimeter under the surface. Every time we peel a surface, a new surface will appear immediately, like an infinite loop. How does one perceive these infinite surfaces, or loosen the surfaces that seem to be firmly interwoven?”

She has exhibited widely and her solo show “Dear Oblivion” at Michael Janssen gallery, runs from September 14 to November 16, 2019 in Berlin. Tezuka’s work is also on view September 7 – 28, 2019 at MA2 gallery in Tokyo. See more from the artist on Instagram. (via The Jealous Curator)

 

 



Art

Thread Recreations of Famous Paintings Produced by Mathematical Algorithms

August 6, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Moscow-based programmer Ani Abakumova uses algorithms to organize lengths of colored thread into the style of classic paintings. Although the mathematical formulas for the placement of each thread are created on her computer, Abakumova performs the labor of attaching each string in the correct order and pattern. She works exclusively on circular hoops, narrowing her focus on the subject of each painting such as the Mona Lisa or the Girl with a Pearl Earring. You can see more of Abakumova’s threaded recreations on Instagram. (via Design You Trust)

 

 



Art

Colorful Strands of Thread and Beads Highlight the Contours of Human Skulls

February 14, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Jim F. Faure, who goes by Jim Skull, introduces his decades-long practice with his pseudonym. The Paris-based sculptor focuses exclusively on human skulls. Using innumerable strands of colorful thread, Murano glass beads, rope, and even porcupine quills, Faure creates an entirely new “skin” for the skeletal forms. Each skull’s covering also trails off into dramatic cascades that shape-shift depending on how the skull is displayed.

Faure transforms the surface of an object that often strikes fear into a visually enticing decorative object, inviting the viewer to study the divots and contours of our shared anatomical structure. In an artist statement, the sculptor cites his upbringing in New Caledonia in the South Pacific, followed by wide-ranging international travels in New Zealand, India, and Hong Kong as informing his fascination with the ritual and cultural aspects of the human experience. You can see more of Faure’s work on his website.

 

 



Art Craft Illustration

Intricate Landscapes and Tiny Houses ‘Painted’ With Multi-Colored Thread

December 3, 2018

Andrew LaSane

Utah-based artist Stephanie K. Clark (previously) considers herself a painter, but the works she creates are not made with a traditional painterly medium. Using embroidery techniques and strands of floss in a spectrum of colors, Clark paints little houses, landscapes, and other scenes that look as if they exist in the natural world and are being lit by the moon or sun.

“My process is much like any painter,” Stephanie tells Colossal. “I started out as a drawer/painter and I’ve just carried that same process into my embroidery work. I always use image and color references for my pieces. I lay out my pallet of thread/floss and I start laying the colors as if I’m painting. They eventually start blending themselves.”

Working at various scales (as small as 5″ x 5″, and as large as 6-foot-wide canvases), Clark says that the time invested depends on the size and detail of the piece, with small houses taking between 6 to 12 hours to complete, and larger landscapes requiring up to 20 hours. “I consider myself a fast worker for embroidery,” she explained, “which tends to be slow and tedious. Sometimes I have to remind myself to slow down and when I do, the pieces come out so much prettier.”

When not working on commissions, Clark’s thread paintings are inspired by her personal life: “My concepts typically go along with my life, my family, my home, and my heart.” To see more of her work, follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Art Craft

Improvised Wall Tapestries Crafted with Vibrant Thread Combinations

August 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Spanish textile artist Judit Just Anteló moved to Asheville, North Carolina in 2013 to further develop her textile brand Jujujust. Although she studied fashion design, sculpture, and textile art in her hometown of Barcelona, she first learned the standards of weaving from her mother as a small child. Anteló applies these more traditional techniques to her current practice, updating the old methods with splashes of neon color and engaging combinations of vibrant threads.

“Most of my tapestries are just an involuntary result of an improvisation, a dance with colors and materials,” Anteló tells Colossal. “I like to let myself flow and see what it transforms into afterwards. Once I finish and approve one design, I keep the original in my studio to reproduce it in different color variations. Then I redo them and make them evolve and metamorphose into other creations.”

Anteló weaves her tapestries with rye knots created on a lap loom or eight-harness table loom, depending on which type of wall hanging she is attempting to make. You can find a variety of her works for sale on her Etsy shop, and take a peek into her studio on Instagram.

 

 



Art

A Ghostly Piano Releases Nearly Three Centuries of Music and Memory

June 15, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Copyright VG Bild-Kinst, Bonn, 2018 and the artist. Courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Photo © Jonty Wilde

A ghostly piano frame releases swarms of white thread and sheet music in a new installation at Yorkshire Sculpture Park by Japanese artist Chiharu Shiota (previously). The work, titled Beyond Time, is installed in an 18th century chapel. Yorkshire Sculpture Park describes Shiota’s work as referencing “the Chapel’s rich history and years of human presence, dating back to 1744, making poignant allusion to the bells that were rung, the songs that were sung, and the lives that revolved around it, from cradle to grave.”

Shiota lives in Berlin, and exhibits widely. Her installations are currently on view in GothenburgMilan, and Knislinge, and a new piece opens in Germany on June 22, 2018. You can see more of the artist’s projects on Instagram and Facebook.

Photos © India and Magnus / Haarkon

Photo © India and Magnus / Haarkon

Copyright VG Bild-Kinst, Bonn, 2018 and the artist. Courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Photo © Jonty Wilde

Copyright VG Bild-Kinst, Bonn, 2018 and the artist. Courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Photo © Jonty Wilde

Copyright VG Bild-Kinst, Bonn, 2018 and the artist. Courtesy Yorkshire Sculpture Park. Photo © Jonty Wilde

 

 



Art

Hand-Dyed Crocheted Thread Carefully Covers Eggs, Seeds, and Tree Trunks

May 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Esther Traugot connects to the natural world by collecting and covering seed pods, eggs, severed tree trunks, and other natural objects in tightly-wrapped textile “skins.” She uses hand-dyed gold threads to crochet around these objects in order to temporarily mend what has previously been broken or abandoned. Through her work Traugot straddles the line of nurture and control, investigating her dual role as a member and observer of the natural landscape.

“The meticulous act of crocheting mimics the instinct to nurture and protect what is viable, what is becoming precious,” she explains in an artist statement. “As in gilding, these false ‘skins’ imbue the objects with an assumed desirability or value; the wrapping becomes an act of veneration. Although futile in its attempt at archiving and preservation, it suggests optimism.”

Traugot is interested in “contemporary naturalism,” or artwork that cares for the environment in our current global ecological state, and also views her work in conversation with Land and Environmental Art and Feminism. She received her BFA from the University of California Berkeley in 2005 and her MFA from Mills College in 2009. Traugot is represented by Chandra Cerrito Contemporary Gallery in Oakland, California, and currently lives and works in Sebastopol, CA. You can view more of her gold threaded objects on her website.