Toru Kurokawa

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Art

Evoking Organic Growth, Toru Kurokawa’s Ceramic Sculptures Stretch and Swell into Abstract Forms

January 17, 2023

Grace Ebert

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Visceral vision.” All images © Toru Kurokawa, shared with permission

The natural growth process, which begins with the replication of a single cell and eventually produces bodily systems and lifeforms, informs the practice of artist Toru Kurokawa (previously). Based in Kyoto, Kurokawa transforms amorphous hunks of clay into organic sculptures that bow and bend. The malleable material stretches to reveal pockets of negative space or to generate undulating edges, and once fired, the works appear to freeze those movements. “I would like to create a space that fuses the two things, existence and non-existence,” the artist tells Colossal. “I am conscious of that connection.” Glazed in textured, neutral tones, the resulting forms are abstract and biological, conveying the tension and strength of change.

Kurokawa is currently considering how mathematics and physics can influence the geometries of the works, and you can follow that progress on Instagram.

 

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Earth pot”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Aggregate β”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Holosroidea”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Black garden”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Threshold”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Aire”

A photo of a ceramic sculpture with pockets of negative space

“Protocell J”

 

 

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Art

The Dripping and Undulating Ceramic Sculptures of Toru Kurokawa

January 4, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Black Mountain, 2015. Ceramic. 39 2/5 × 31 1/2 × 39 2/5 in

Japanese artist Toru Kurokawa sculpts improbable liquid and biological shapes from a variety of ceramic materials. What begins life as a mere lump of clay, the artist molds and carves into artworks that appear like arrays of honeycomb, undulating coral, or dripping stalactites. Last year Kurokawa had a solo show with Sokyo Gallery titled The Savage Math, and you can see more of his work on Artsy. (via Sophie Gunnol)