urban intervention

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Art

Humorous New Contextual Street Sign Interventions by Michael Pederson

January 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Look close, or you’ll miss it. Camouflaged like legitimate street signs in public spaces around Sydney you’ll find these fun urban interventions by artist Michael Pederson (aka Miguel Marquez Outside). A park solitude rating guide, oversized emergency panic buttons, or personal space preference cards, all completely ludicrous and yet it’s hard not to think these might be useful in certain situations. We’ve mentioned Pederson here previously, and you can see more of Pederson’s work on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Artist Benedetto Bufalino Unveils a Disco Ball Cement Truck

December 13, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Thanks to French artist Benedetto Bufalino, you can now dance the night away at a construction site turned night club with the help of his new Diso Ball Cement Mixer. The truck was parked from December 8-10 in Lyon, France where bright spotlights pointed at the truck turned the streets and building facades into swirling dance party. The spectacle apparently grabbed the attention of quite a few passersby who stopped to take photos and film the otherwise mundane work site that was transformed for a few hours each night.

Bufalino is known for his unconventional approach to urban interventions, frequently installing active aquariums into phone booths and creating a variety of public art pieces in unexpected places. (via Designboom)

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Art

Artist Christo Guelov Creates Dozens of Colorfully Alternative Pedestrian Crossings in Madrid

September 23, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Seeing opportunity just under his feet, artist Christo Guelov wondered how a mundane street crossing could be turned into a thing of beauty. Like the design of a chair or the face of a watch, it turns out the possibilities are probably endless. The Bulgarian artist transformed dozens of pedestrian crossings in Madrid as part of his series Funnycross, working with a palette of friendly colors to paint fun geometric patterns on streets across the city. You can see much more of the project on his website. (via My Modern Met)

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Art Design

A Herd of Cats Fill Advertising Placements at a London Tube Stop for Two Weeks

September 13, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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The Citizens Advertising Takeover Service replaced 68 adverts in Clapham Common tube station with pictures of cats. Organisers say they hope the pictures will help people think differently about the world around them. Credit: CatsnotAds.org

The Clapham Common Tube station in London is currently covered in cats, and for the most part it’s just as straightforward as it may seem. A project known as the Citizens Advertising Takeover Service (or CATS), took over 68 advertisements in the station as a way to bring cute imagery into the daily vision of passersby, while momentarily ceasing the onslaught of continuous advertising faced during daily commutes, and life. CATS secured the money to finance the project through a Kickstarter campaign six months ago, and in the end raised £23,000.

Started by Glimpse, CATS is the first project by the collective who hopes to bring about social change via creative campaigns. Many of the cats Glimpse photographed for the 68 advertisements are stray cats from two rescue charities, Battersea Dogs & Cats Home, and Cats Protection. You can learn more about the two organizations on Glimpse’s website. (via Laughing Squid, PetaPixel)

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The Citizens Advertising Takeover Service replaced 68 adverts in Clapham Common tube station with pictures of cats. Organisers say they hope the pictures will help people think differently about the world around them. Credit: CatsnotAds.org

The Citizens Advertising Takeover Service replaced 68 adverts in Clapham Common tube station with pictures of cats. Organisers say they hope the pictures will help people think differently about the world around them. Credit: CatsnotAds.org

The Citizens Advertising Takeover Service replaced 68 adverts in Clapham Common tube station with pictures of cats. Organisers say they hope the pictures will help people think differently about the world around them. Credit: CatsnotAds.org

The Citizens Advertising Takeover Service replaced 68 adverts in Clapham Common tube station with pictures of cats. Organisers say they hope the pictures will help people think differently about the world around them. Credit: CatsnotAds.org

The Citizens Advertising Takeover Service replaced 68 adverts in Clapham Common tube station with pictures of cats. Organisers say they hope the pictures will help people think differently about the world around them. Credit: CatsnotAds.org

 

 



Design

Pirate Printers: Shirts and Totes Printed Directly on Urban Utility Covers

July 26, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Using public street fixtures as printing elements, the artist collective behind Berlin-based Raubdruckerin (pirate printer) produces shirts and bags imprinted with manhole covers, vents, and utility grates. The overlooked geometric patterns and typographic forms of urban signage make surprisingly nifty graphics for shirts. The collective applies ink directly to the streets and prints on-site in locations like Amsterdam, Lisbon, and Paris and then sell their creations through an online shop. It would be amazing to see something like this come out of Japan. (via Quipsologies)

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Art

Humorous Street Signs and Other Contextual Street Art Interventions by Michael Pederson

October 20, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Across the urban cityscape of Sydney, in parks, suburban streets, and industrial zones, you’re likely to encounter a plethora of signs and placards while going about your day: warnings, traffic regulations, helpful guides, and city services. But, look closer, and you might find an intervention by artist Michael Pederson who delights in creating humorous and thoughtful signs that blend into the city backdrop. Pederson makes use of pre-existing elements like park benches or abandoned furniture to share messages meant to snap a viewer out of their daily routine and see the world from a more contemplative or even childlike perspective, if only for a moment. You can see more of his installations dating back to 2012 on his Tumblr. (via Lustik, Junk Culture)

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Art

Three-Dozen Floral Designers Transform a Condemned Detroit Duplex with 36,000 Flowers

October 16, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Photo by Heather Saunders. Mural by Ouizi

Last November, florist Lisa Waud went to a public auction and purchased an abandoned house in Detroit, Michigan—sight unseen. Crumbling and condemned, the aging duplex was filled knee-high with trash, broken bottles, and even a dead dog. Her winning bid: $250. But Waud had a vision. She planned to invite florists from Michigan, Ohio, New York and Canada to fill the house with a temporary art installation of 36,000 flowers. This morning, Flower House opens to the public.

After a year of planning and three days of solid labor from dozens of volunteers, Flower House now contains room after room of independant flower designs and installations that flow together to create an immersive blooming environment. The piece is part art installation, part memorial to Detroit’s history, and an effort in sustainability and responsibility to American-grown flower farms.

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

Waud estimated the entire endeavor may cost up to $150,000 but when flower suppliers California Cut Flower Commission, Mayesh and Nordlie learned of her plans, all three offered to donate their flowers.

Flower House will be opened to ticketed visitors from Friday until Sunday. When the installation is finished, Reclaim Detroit will demolish the house, leaving only an empty field. Materials taken from the structure will be repurposed into new objects like cutting boards, guitars, and tables. Waud intends to then utilize the land as seasonal farm to help supply flowers like dahlias and peonies for her floral business Pot & Box.

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

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Photo by Heather Saunders

Flower House is open for three days only, and tickets are already sold out. You can learn more about the installation on the official Flower House website. All photos by Heather Saunders.

 

 

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