video

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Art

High Voltage Erosion: 15,000 Volts Travels Through Wood

March 2, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Pratt student Melanie Hoff connected cables carrying 15,000 volts of electricity to a large plank of wood and then documented the results. Surprisingly the areas around each contact point don’t simply catch on fire or burn in a circle, but rather traverse outward in a fractal-like pattern, like lighting in slow motion. Watch it all unfold above. (via colossal submissions)

 

 

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Art Dance

Choros: A Transfixing Experimental Dance Film by Michael Langan & Terah Maher

February 27, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Released three weeks ago after a year on tour at various film festivals, Choros is the latest experimental art film from director Michael Langan that explores the movement of the human body, specifically the motion of dancer Terah Maher. Choros follows in the steps of Eadweard Muybridge, Etienne-Jules Marey, and Norman McLaren, all of whom spent years studying the physical moment of animals and humans through film. Langan takes the next step using new digital innovations to layer some 32 sequential instances of a single movement and then stretch it out over time. Set to Steve Reich’s Music for 18 Musicians, the 13-minute video is pulsating, hypnotic, and flat out lovely to watch. You can read more about it over at Short of the Week.

 

 



Art Design

Seb Lester Demonstrates Medieval Blackletter Calligraphy

February 26, 2013

Christopher Jobson

In this brief video graphic designer and illustrator Seb Lester demonstrates a form of Medieval blackletter typography that was used commonly in Europe from 1150 to around the 17th century. From a person whose handwriting is almost completely illegible, almost every stroke of his pen looks like a complete miracle. (via vimeo)

 

 



Documentary Photography

Finding Vivian Maier: A New Documentary About One of the World’s Most Mysterious Street Photographers

February 16, 2013

Christopher Jobson

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In 2007 Chicago 26-year-old real estate agent (and president of the Jefferson Park Historical Society) John Maloof walked into an auction house and placed a $380 bid on a box of 30,000 prints and negatives from an unknown photographer. Realizing the street photographs of 1950s/60s era Chicago and New York were of unusually high quality he purchased another lot of photographer’s work totaling some 100,000 photographic negatives, thousands of prints, 700 rolls of undeveloped color film, home movies, audio tape interviews, and original cameras.

Over time it became clear the photos belonged to a Chicago nanny named Vivian Maier who had photographed prolifically for nearly 40 years, but who never shared her work during her lifetime. Since the discovery Maier’s photographs have received international attention with collections touring in cities around the world as well as the publication of a book. Now, a documentary called Finding Vivian Maier directed by Maloof and Charlie Siskel is nearing completion and the trailer above is a tantalizing preview of what promises to me a fascinating film. Can’t wait.

 

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Animation Music

Favorite Place: An Embroidered Stop-Motion Music Video for Black Books by Christophe Thockler

February 5, 2013

Christopher Jobson

Is this the first music video made exclusively with embroidery and sewing implements? I’m gambling yes. Directed, filmed, and produced by Christophe Thockler the clip uses 10,000 photographs of needles, thread, cloth and embroidery, mixed with clever lighting techniques to produce a fun video for Favorite Place, the latest track by US pop rock band Black Books.

 

 



Amazing Design Documentary

The Centrifuge Brain Project: A Documentary About Impossible Amusement Rides

February 4, 2013

Christopher Jobson

In this brilliantly fun mockumentary from German filmmaker Till Nowak, a man named Dr. Nick Laslowicz from the Institute for Centrifugal Research (ICR) recounts his “achievements in the realms of brain manipulation, excessive G-Force and prenatal simulations,” stating unequivocally that “gravity is a mistake.” What follows is a series of increasingly terrifying and equally absurd roller coasters that fling passengers into the sky in an attempt to theoretically improve their cognitive function. Pulling no stops, the fictional ICR has a fully active Facebook page and website, though in reality the film has won numerous awards in screenings around the world in the last year. (via the creators project, swissmiss)

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