war

Posts tagged
with war



Animation

Joy of Destruction

January 18, 2011

Christopher Jobson

Xaver Xylophon is a 24 year-old visual communications graduate from KHB Berlin Weißensee. He likes melancholy robots, the smell of new tennis balls, and creating some pretty fantastic stop-motion shorts. I also really enjoyed the organic Zyklus I.

 

 



Animation

Streets Against The War

January 2, 2011

Christopher Jobson

This video was shot on 294 walls in four different Turkish cities. If you’re impatient skip ahead to about 1:00 for the good stuff.

 

 



History Photography

Pavel Maria Smejkal, Fatescapes

November 27, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Iconic historical war photos with the subjects removed by Slovakian artist Pavel Maria Smejkal. (via i like this art)

 

 



History Photography

Seregey Larenkov: Berlin, Prague, Moscow 1945/2010

November 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Russian photographer Sergey Larenkov melds photos taken during World War II with photos he shoots himself from the same vantage point in locations around Berlin, Prague, Moscow and Vienna. The results are an extremely haunting juxtaposition of time and place. See full-size images via his blog. (via theo)

 

 



Photography

A Year on the Ground in Iraq

November 9, 2010

Christopher Jobson

Photos by American soldier and photographer Greg Miller who spent a year as an infantryman and Stryker vehicle commander of the 4th Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division.

 

 



Design History

Dazzle Camouflage Gives Warships an Unlikely Disguise

October 22, 2010

Christopher Jobson

I’ve been meaning to post this for a while ever since seeing it on Graphic Hug a while back but it kinda fell off the radar. Dazzle camouflage was a technique used during both WWI and WWII to obscure aspects war ships.

At first glance Dazzle seems unlikely camouflage, drawing attention to the ship rather than hiding it, but this technique was developed after the Allied Navies were unable to develop effective means to disguise ships in all weather.

Dazzle did not conceal the ship but made it difficult for the enemy to estimate its type, size, speed and heading. The idea was to disrupt the visual rangefinders used for naval artillery. Its purpose was confusion rather than concealment. An observer would find it difficult to know exactly whether the stern or the bow is in view; and it would be equally difficult to estimate whether the observed vessel is moving towards or away from the observer’s position.

RISD also has a super cool online gallery on the topic. Great stuff. On a related note, and from a different war, see also Quaker Guns. (via graphic hug)