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Art

Anatomical Sculptures by Claude-Olivier Guay Transform to Reveal Intricate Wire Creatures

January 24, 2017

Christopher Jobson

At the outset, these sculptures by artist Claude-Olivier Guay appear like a jumble of wire and feathers folded into a heap, but each hides a remarkable secret. Working only with a pair of pliers, Guay folds, bends, and twists an inner framework of hidden creatures that dramatically transform with a bit of manual manipulation. In his 2015 piece titled La Tanière the bust of a woman’s figure turns completely into an angry wolf, or the figure of a man’s head bursts into a cloud of 40 locusts in a piece called Cénotaphe.

Guay studied visual arts at the Université du Québec à Montréal and is currently based in Québec City. You can see several more works on his website. (via Colossal Submissions, thnx Virginia!)

 

 



Illustration

Elegant Wireframe Animal Renderings by 3D Artist Mat Szulik

October 31, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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Freelance illustrator and 3D artist Mat Szulik (previously) creates incredibly realistic models, digitally rendering figures that appear as if they were formed from materials such as wood, and most recently wire. His latest project, titled The Wires v2, presents the outlines of forest creatures, horses, and beetles, each placed in stark, white environments or amongst trees built in the same style as the wire animals. The renderings are almost entirely silver wire, yet many also contain a gold core to add a further layer of dimensionality. You can see works from Szulik’s first wire series, The Wires v1, as well as other 3D projects on his Behance.

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Art

Crocheted Wire Anatomy by Anne Mondro

May 16, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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Since the earliest days of her artistic career, Michigan artist Anne Mondro has been captivated by human anatomy, creating her own interpretations of internal organs and body forms through crocheted sculptures. Working with thin steel and copper wire, she spends hundreds of hours on a single artwork, manifesting her own interpretations of hearts, lungs, limbs, and even entire bodies. “Crocheting wire enables me to create interwoven forms that are structurally strong, yet visually and physically light,” Mondro shares. “The forms allude to ethereal silhouettes associated with shadows, ghosts or decay.”

Though anatomy is an ongoing focus for Mondo, she’s also lent her crocheting abilities to the construction of more mechanical objects, namely the recreation of a Model T engine for the 2011 Love Lace exhibition at the Powerhouse Museum.

Late this year Mondro has an exhibition at Ceres Gallery in New York titled Intertwine, and you can explore more of her work here. (via Bored Panda)

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Art Design History

An Early Christian Church Resurrected in Towering Wire Mesh by Edoardo Tresoldi

March 31, 2016

Kate Sierzputowski

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all images © Blind Eye Factory

With hundreds of yards of wire mesh artist Edoardo Tresoldi has built an interpretation of an early Christian church that once stood in its place at the current Archaeological Park of Siponto, Italy. Built with the assistance of the Ministry of Cultural Heritage and Activities and the Archaeology Superintendence of Puglia, the installation connects ancient archaeology with contemporary art. The sculpture stands on the former church’s site with a ghostly presence, looking almost like a hologram illuminated in the park. Despite its sheer appearance the installation contains detailed architetural elements including tiered columns, domes, and statues that stand within the structure.

You can see more of Tresoldi’s work on his Facebook and Behance.  (via Designboom)

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Art

Sketches in the Air: Delicate Figures Drawn in the Air with Welded Steel Rods by Gavin Worth

January 25, 2016

Christopher Jobson

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“Flora 1” – Steel rods and ebonized wood, 72cm x 72cm x 20cm

Artist Gavin Worth (previously) works with repurposed steel rods and wire welded into two dimensional sculptures appear as illustrated line drawings. Some of the artworks are meant to be viewed against the dramatic backdrop of the sky, or can be amplified through projected light and shadow. Other pieces, like his 2012 sculpture Thirst, have a kinetic component and can be rotated to reveal opposing images.

Worth recently lived in Egypt for three years and has since relocated to Switzerland. He opens a new exhibition of work at Barbara Frigerio Contemporary Art in Milan starting later this month.

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“Flora 1” – Steel rods and ebonized wood, 72cm x 72cm x 20cm

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“Flora 2” – Steel rods and ebonized wood, 59cm x 65cm x 20cm

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“Flora 3” – Steel rods and ebonized wood, 56cm x 69cm x 20cm

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“Flora 4” – Steel rods and ebonized wood, 40cm x 69cm x 20cm

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“Flora 5” – Steel rods and ebonized wood, 45cm x 66cm x 20cm

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“Flora 6” – Steel rods and ebonized wood, 82cm x 148cm x 20cm

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“Sophia” – Steel rods, 182cm x 485cm

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“Thirst” – Repurposed steel rods, 48″x92″x92″

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“The Egyptian Sibyl” – Steel rods, 20 feet by 17 feet

 

 



Art

Wire Animal Sculptures that Look Like Scribbled Pencil Drawings by David Oliveira

October 9, 2015

Christopher Jobson

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Artist David Oliveira (previously) works with wire in an unconventional way by cutting and twisting the material into sculptures that could be mistaken for 2D sketches. Despite the apparent difficulty of shaping wire into a recognizable form, Oliveira manages to achieve uncanny proportions of his animal subjects in this series of sculptures from 2014. Viewed from one angle the pieces could be mistaken for a chaotic jumble, but a shift in perspective reveals the squinting eyes of lions, or the spread wings of a pelican. The Lisbon-based artist also creates vast interior installations of birds and thoughtful examinations of the human form. You can scroll through an archive of his work over on Facebook. (via Cross Connect)

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Art

Large Wire-Frame Sculpture Shows the Glowing Forms of Children Trapped Within Adult Bodies

September 16, 2015

Kate Sierzputowski

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Photo by Andrew Miller

Ukrainian sculptor, blacksmith, and designer Alexander Milov has produced a large wire-frame sculpture that features the forms of children that glow when day turns to night. The outer sculpture is two adults sitting back to back while the inner sculpture displays the two children touching hands through the metal wires.

Milov’s sculpture titled Love depicts a scene of conflict with hope and innocence rising from within. “It demonstrates a conflict between a man and a woman as well as the outer and inner expression of human nature,” said Milov. “The figures of the protagonists are made in the form of big metal cages, where their inner selves are captivated. Their inner selves are executed in the form of transparent children, who are holding out their hands through the grating. As it’s getting dark (night falls) the children chart to shine. This shining is a symbol of purity and sincerity that brings people together and gives a chance of making up when the dark time arrives.”

The giant sculpture was produced for this year’s Burning Man and is the first time in 30 years that Ukraine has received a grant to produce work for the festival. You can see more examples of this year’s sculptures on the festival’s art installation archive here. (via Bored Panda)

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Photo by Andrew Miller

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Photo by Andrew Miller

 

 

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