Trompe L’Oeil Ceramics That Imitate the Natural Appearance of Decaying Wood

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

Ceramicist Christopher David White (previously) accurately captures the decay of wood through ceramics, portraying the distinct character of the natural material from the fine wood grain to the light ash coloration at the pieces’ edges. By utilizing a trompe l’oeil technique, White forces the viewer to take a closer look at his work while also investigating the truth hidden in the hyperrealistic sculptures.

Through his ceramic pieces White explores the reality of impermanence, often combining man and nature through treelike limbs and faces. “I seek to expose the beauty that often results from decay while, at the same time, making my viewer question their own perception of the world around them,” explains White. He hopes to highlight the fact that we are not separate from nature, but rather intrinsically connected to it.

White has a BFA in Ceramics from Indiana University and MFA in Craft and Material Studies from Virginia Commonwealth University. White’s work will be included in the exhibition Hyper-realism at the Daejeon Museum of Art in South Korea opening this fall. (via Artist a Day)

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Going Hand In Hand, 8.5″ x 26″ x 15.5″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

Theis Exhibition

A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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A Walk That Is Measured And Slow, 14″ x 14″ 29″, 2015, (Ceramic, acrylic, drywall, iron oxide)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Asphyxia, 2013, H: 11″ W: 9″ D: 11″, (Ceramic, acrylic)

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Welder Scott Raabe Places Interlocking Patterns of Molten Metal Between Pipes

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For Scott Raabe, his craft lies is in the very fine details—the intersection between pipes and other cuts of metal one might typically glance over without a second thought. It’s in these fine crevices that Raabe welds layered patterns, using his seven years of expertise to create interlocking designs that seem to glow a metallic rainbow sheen after being welded. For the layperson, typical welding this is not.

Raabe started out as a small parts and custom welder for a production company after graduating from Texas State Technical College. In addition to creating unique patterns during his day job as a pipe fitter and welder, he also creates more elaborate commissions including large roses and butterflies on his site Clean Cut Metal Works. You can see more of Raabe’s work on his Instagram. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Meet a Completely Colorblind Man Who Uses Special Tech to ‘Hear’ Colors

Produced as a part of The Connected Series, Hearing Colors, is a short film that explores the life of Neil Harbisson, a man who was born with achromatopsia that leaves 1 in 30,000 completely colorblind. Through an antenna-like object implanted into the back of his head, Harbisson is able to gain a comprehension of the colors around him by hearing distinct sounds.

Harbisson completely embraces the unusual technology and openly refers to himself as a cyborg. “I don’t feel that I am using technology. I don’t feel that I am wearing technology. I feel that I am technology,” Harbisson explains. “I feel no difference between the software and my brain.”

The five minute film, shot in black and white, gives the audience a sense of Harbisson’s artificially created one, letting us peer into how he sees humans, cities, and everyday life.

Hearing Colors was created by filmmaker Greg Brunkalla. You can see more of his films on his Vimeo page here. (via Swissmiss)

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Sponsor // Get 50% Off the Craftsy Online-Video Class ‘Sketchbooks: Drawing the Everyday’

Sketch like a pro, even on the go! Gain the skills you need to become a better artist when you join Paul Heaston in the online Craftsy class, Sketchbooks: Drawing the Everyday, for 50% off today — a special offer for Colossal readers. In these online-video lessons, you’ll learn an inspiring range of ways to use pencil, ink and watercolor to capture the world around you.

In these online-video lessons, you’ll begin by discovering an array of texture-building ink techniques to express light and shadow. Then, infuse your work with color and character using Paul’s pro tips for painting smooth watercolor washes, and combine what you’ve learned to create eye-catching compositions. Whether you want to depict people, architecture or nature, you’ll gain the confidence and creative skills to fill up your sketchbook with pieces you’ll want to show off!

Visit Craftsy.com now to get 50% off lifetime access to the online class, Sketchbooks: Drawing the Everyday, and watch it anytime, anywhere. Offer expires August 24, 2015 at 11:59pm MT.

A Life-Sized Human Skull Sculpted from Raspberry Flavored Sugar by Joseph Marr

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Joseph Marr (some artworks nsfw) is an Australian multi-media artist based in Berlin known for his anatomically perfect sugar constructions of the human body that explore issues of desire and mortality. Last year for an organ donor charity called Live Life Give Life, a special art exhibition was organized by the Skull Appreciate Society titled Celebrabis Vitae where artist were invited to create skull-themed artworks. Marr’s contribution to the macabrely tongue-in-cheek event was this life-size translucent skull made from edible raspberry-flavored sugar.

Marr explains on his website that sugar only melts at a dangerously hot temperature of 366.8°F (186°C), and then cools rapidly once the heat source is removed, giving him only the slightest window to work with the maleable goo. “It’s a sensory overload, the smell, the colour, the heat and the honey like movement… it’s sharp like glass and smooth like marble and at the same time rough like concrete. Unpredictable.”

This year’s campaign organized by the Skull Appreciation Society is called the Day of the Living.

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A Ziggurat of Mirrors by Shirin Abedinirad Connects the Sky and Ground in Sydney

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Artist Shirin Abedinirad (previously) just completed work on her latest sculpture, Mirrored Ziggurat, a pyramid of mirrors resting near a bay in Sydney, Australia as part of the Underbelly Arts Festival. Like her earlier mirror works, the Iranian artist is fascinated by stitching the sky to the ground (or vice versa, depending on your perspective) to create unusual optical illusions from almost every viewing angle. From her statement about the piece:

In this installation I have been inspired by the pyramidal structure of Ziggurat, a common form of temple in ancient Mesopotamia, attempting to connect earth and sky, so humans could be nearer to god. The Mirrored Ziggurat acts as a staircase, which seeks to connect nature with human beings and to create union of ancient history and today’s world. This installation offers a transformative view of the self.

You can see more views of the installation as well as a video on her website.

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Everbright: A Giant Interactive Light Toy That’s Like a Lite-Brite for Grown-Ups

At 42x the size of a traditional ‘Light-Brite’ toy, the Everbright by San Francisco-based Hero Design is a huge grid of adjustable LEDs for drawing with light. But instead of only a limited selection of individual colors, the Everbright relies on 464 dials that change in hue as you twist them, offering almost unlimited color possibilities when creating designs. When you’re done drawing, the entire board resets to a blank canvas with the press of a single button. While fully interactive, it also comes pre-programmed with several animations that can play when not in use.

You can learn more about Everbright here, and it looks like this has already moved beyond a concept and the devices are now available for sale. (via Designboom, Neatorama)

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