A Fearless Hummingbird Visits a Man in His Kitchen

This is a wonderful slice of life video featuring a man named João Silvestrini from Barretos, Brazil who is visited daily by hummingbirds… in his kitchen. It’s fun enough to see him feeding the bird from his finger, but the kicker is what happens when it flies back outside. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Afterglow: Skiers Traverse an Alaskan Mountain Range Wearing LED Light Suits

Afterglow: Skiers Traverse an Alaskan Mountain Range Wearing LED Light Suits video art stunts snow skiing light advertising

Afterglow: Skiers Traverse an Alaskan Mountain Range Wearing LED Light Suits video art stunts snow skiing light advertising

This new promotional clip for Philips TV and Atomic Skis features several skiers wearing multi-colored LED light suits as they traverse mountains at an Alaskan ski resort at night. The brightly lit suits create a fantastic glow around each skier that illuminates anything nearby. While I don’t see him listed in the credits, the video seems to be an homage to Jacob Sutton’s L.E.D. Surfer from two years ago. (via Vimeo)

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Dizzying New Wind-Powered Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe

Dizzying New Wind Powered Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe kinetic sculpture

Kinetic sculptor Anthony Howe (previously) has created a number of new kinetic artworks since we featured his work here last year. The artist works with specialized software to first mockup each piece digitally before fabricating the individual components from metal. The motion you see is generated completely by the wind, with even the slightest breeze setting the dozens of rotating components in action. You can see more of his recent work on his YouTube channel.

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A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

Emulsifier is a curious glass sculpture designed by artist Thomas Medicus. The piece is built from 160 glass strips that are hand-painted on four sides with complimentary images. Only when the object is rotated and viewed from the right angle do the images appear. Watch the video above to see how it works.

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DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima

DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima paper origami kinetic sculpture

Partially inspired by Erik Åberg’s interlocking kinetic cube system Ghostcubes, Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima created a method for building a similar object using a system of 40 paper cubes. For those of you ambitious enough to give it a try he shared a set of instructions on Instructables. Just 45 steps!

If you’re not familiar with Nakashima, he runs the most popular instructional origami channel on YouTube, with some of his videos racking up over 13 million views. (via Instructables)

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Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

When first contemplating these glass sculptures by Seattle-based artist Carol Milne, your imagination runs wild trying to figure out how she does it. Glass has a melting point of around 1,500°F (815°C), so how could it possibly manipulated into neatly organized yarn-like strands that are looped around knitting needles. The answer lies in a technique invented by Milne in 2006 that involves aspects of knitting, lost-wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

You can see much more of Milne’s work at the Glass Art Society, on Facebook, and in her online gallery. (via Lustik)

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Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

A few Latvian activists from a branch of the bicycle advocacy group Let’s Bike it recently created a visual reminder of the space taken by cars on a typical road. To accomplish this, the group fabricated bamboo skeletons shaped like actual cars and mounted them on their bikes. The activists then cycled around the streets of Riga for several hours to highlight the absurdity of using a large car to move a single person. The stunt was organized as part of European Mobility Week, an ongoing campaign that explores sustainable urban mobility around Europe. (via Designboom, My Modern Met)

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