Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Tomcat Brothers: The Illustrated Adventures of Two Space Age Boys and Their Graffiti Cat street art illustration digital cats

Digital painter and concept artist Piotr Jabłoński creates brutally detailed paintings for videogames and comic books which often veer into the realm of horror, but in his spare time dabbles in somewhat tamer sketches and other random ideas that he shares with fans on Facebook. A few months ago he stumbled onto the idea of two small brothers in futuristic space helmets who explore the world with a feline pal, a giant cat mural that follows them everywhere, provided there’s a wall. The response online has been incredible, with fans demanding an art book or even an entire comic book series. While nothing is concrete yet you can see more on Behance, and a few of the panels are available now as prints.

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure
China Caves 2012 / Hong Meigui Expedition to explore giant caves in Wulong County.

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure
China Caves 2012 / Hong Meigui Expedition to explore giant caves in Wulong County.

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure
The giant caves of Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia.

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure
Exploring The Gouffre Berger (cave) in the Vercors region of France. At just over 1000m deep, The Gouffre Berger is recognised as one of the best sport trips in the world.

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure
A cave explorer climbing out of a Maelstrom on the fixed rope in Boxhead Pot, Yorkshire Dales.

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure
The giant caves of Mulu National Park, Sarawak, Borneo, Malaysia

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure
China Caves 2012 / Hong Meigui Expedition to explore giant caves in Wulong County.

Underworld: The Intrepid Cave Photography of Robbie Shone travel China caves adventure

Robbie Shone is a British adventure, cave and travel photographer based out of Austria. His adventures have led him to the remotest areas of China, Papua New Guinea, Borneo, the Alps and Crete where he has photographed the deepest, largest, and longest cave systems ever discovered. These feats involve dangling on a thin rope 650 ft. (200m) above the floor in the world’s deepest natural shaft, exploring the far ends of a 117 mile long cave system, and spending nearly four days continuously underground on shoots.

Collected here are some of his most jaw-dropping shots, many from a 2012 excursion into cave systems in Wulong County, China. You can explore more of his cave photography over on his website. All imagery courtesy the photographer. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

Sixteen-Year-Old Artist Wins National Art Competition with Masterful Hyper-Realistic Pencil Portrait

Sixteen Year Old Artist Wins National Art Competition with Masterful Hyper Realistic Pencil Portrait portraits illustration drawing

For the past four years, 16-year-old artist Shania McDonagh has participated in the Texaco Children’s Art Competition, an art contest for children in Ireland held every year since 1955. Just looking at the astounding portrait above, it may come as no surprise that McDonagh has won the top prize for her age category every year since she was 12, and today snagged the top prize for the 2014 competition with this hyperrealistic drawing of a man titled Coleman.

The judging panel chairman, Declan McGonagle, director of the National College of Art & Design, remarked that the girl’s work could position her “as one of the most talented artists of her generation, and one whose skill could see her become one of Ireland’s foremost portrait artists of the future.” We would be inclined to agree.

For her talent McDonagh snagged a $2,075 (€1,500) award which she will receive next month. You can read more and catch a video over at The Irish Times. (via PICDIT)

Update: The original photo was taken by James Fennell, depicting fisherman and seaweed harvester Coleman Coyne.

The Fine Art of Spinning Things

The Fine Art of Spinning Things performance juggling

From the thick of a Brazilian forest to the bustling streets of Taiwan, not to mention a lazy spot in the French countryside, here are three videos of extremely talented people spinning objects with their hands. The first is juggler Gustavo Ollitta who is manipulaing sets of striped blades (called buugengs and triple buugengs) that create a dizzying illusion that appears to warp space and time. The next is a recent video from performer Lindzee Poi who demonstrates something called an amelymeloptical illusion (which, Google as I might, I am unable to define exactly what that means, but apparently it’s this, and it’s amazing). Lastly, two young men from Taiwan take the mindless habit of spinning a pen on your hand to an entirely new level. (via The Kid Should See This, DDN Japan, Devour)

Update: An “amelymeloptical illusion” is a play on words. Blending the title of the movie Amélie (the video uses music by Yann Tiersen from the 2001 film) with the French word la méli-mélo which roughly translates to the “mish mash” or “hodgepodge”. Thanks Brigitte and Kevin.

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

Impermanent Animal Murals Drawn with Chalk and Oil Pastel by Philippe Baudelocque street art pastel murals drawings chalk

French artist Philippe Baudelocque is known for his street murals of animals created with impermenant mediums like chalk or white oil pastels. Each animal is created with a mosaic of delicate line work in the form of organic and geometric patterns that merge to form each piece. Baudelocque most recently participated in the ongoing BergeStreet art event along the banks of the Seine in Paris where he drew the rhinocerous pieces above. You can see much more over on his website. (via Arrested Motion)

Sponsor // Some Favorites from the A’ Design Award Winners

A’ Design Awards is an annual juried design competition honoring the best designers, architects, engineers, design studios, and design oriented companies worldwide to provide them with publicity, fame, and recognition. The A’ Design Awards are awarded annually in a wide range of categories.

Some of our favorite winners from this year’s competition include ‘Rising Moon Pavilion’ by Stanley Siu, ‘Nankin Lab’ Corporate Design by Pau Garcia, and ‘Bridal Veil The Chandelier’ by Victor a. Syrnev. View the full list of winners at adesignaward.com/winnersSponsor // Some Favorites from the A’ Design Award Winners sponsor .

Designers can join the next edition of the A’Design Awards with an exclusive early bird discount between April 27-30. Register at designaward.com/earliest-bird or learn more at whatisadesignaward.com.Sponsor // Some Favorites from the A’ Design Award Winners sponsor

Trompe L’oeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Trompe Loeil Constructions Made from Layers of Plywood by Ron Isaacs wood sculpture

Starting with layers of Finnish birch plywood artist Ron Isaacs builds elaborately designed constructions onto which he paints, in a trompe l’oeil fashion, the delicate details of leaves sprouting from clothing or the textured surface of twigs and bark. Each piece merges three recurring subjects found in most of his works: vintage clothing, plant materials, and found objects. Isaacs shares via his artist statement:

My three primary recurring subjects are vintage clothing (for the way it continues the life of the past into the present, for its rich structures and colors and shapes, and for its anthropomorphic presence as a stand-in for the figure); plant materials in the form of sticks, leaves, and flowers (for too many reasons to list); and found objects. They combine in appropriate or surprising juxtapositions, sometimes purely as a visual “poem” of sorts and (if I’m lucky) sometimes as an image with real psychological resonance. Objects occasionally reappear in other contexts and take on new meanings, like a repertory company of actors playing different roles in different plays.

Isaacs will have several new pieces on view at Snyderman-Works Gallery in Philadelphia starting May 2, 2014. You can also see more of his work over at Tory Folliard Gallery. (via The Jealous Curator)

New Bird & Butterfly Flip Book Machines by Juan Fontanive

New Bird & Butterfly Flip Book Machines by Juan Fontanive kinetic sculpture installation flipbook device butterflies birds automata

Artist Juan Fontanive (previously) constructs perpetually looping flip book machines that depict flying birds lifted from audubon guides and illustrations of butterflies. Part film and part sculpture, almost every aspect of the flip books are assembled by hand from the minutely toothed gears, clips, nuts, bolts, wormwheels and sprockets to the carefully screen printed imagery. Of the curious devices Gild Williams remarked, “Fontanive’s artworks seem strangely possessed, producing curiously moving animals that are neither living nor dead, or creating ghostly systems which seem to float mid-air and follow a pace and logic of their own.” You can see much more of his work over at Riflemaker.

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