CT Scan of 1,000-Year-Old Buddha Statue Reveals Mummified Monk Hidden Inside

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Photo by M. Elsevier Stokmans; Boeddhamummie (Drents Museum)

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(MMC / Jan van Esch)

What looks like a traditional statue of Buddha dating back to the 11th or 12th century was recently revealed to be quite a bit more. A CT scan and endoscopy carried out by the Netherlands-based Drents Museum at the Meander Medical Centre in Amersfoort, showed the ancient reliquary fully encases the mummified remains of a Buddhist master known as Liuquan of the Chinese Meditation School. While it was known beforehand the remains of a person were inside, another startling discovery was made during the scan: where the organs had been removed prior to mummification, researches discovered rolls of paper scraps covered in Chinese writing.

The Liuquan mummy has since been transported to Hungary where it will be on view at the Hungarian Natural History Museum through May of 2015. (via Robs Webstek, Neatorama, Creators Project)

Update: Among some practicing Buddhists it’s been said that similar mummies “aren’t dead” but are instead in an advanced state of meditation. (thnx, Alan!)

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Visually Arresting New Sketchbook Spreads and Drawings by Pat Perry

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Michigan-based artist Pat Perry (previously) spent most of 2014 living a transient life spread across the U.S. His travels took him backpacking, train hopping, and motorcycling with stops in New England, Arkansas, and Texas, all the while dutifully recording his thoughts and observations in his sketchbook. The presence of rural America is a near constant presence in Perry’s work, as well as the frustrations and occasional warnings of humanity colliding with the natural world.

Perry has a number of prints available in his shop and you can also follow his ongoing adventures on Instagram.

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A Shadowy Snoopy on the Streets of Saint-Etienne, France by OakOak

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Street artist OakOak (previously) transformed a parking meter shadow into a perfect silhouette of Snoopy’s famous dog house this past Valentine’s Day in Saint-Etienne, France. You can see more of his recent street interventions here. (via StreetArtNews, Laughing Squid)

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An Extraordinary Macro Timelapse of Aquatic Wildlife by Sandro Bocci

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The above clip is a trailer of sorts for an upcoming non-verbal film titled Prograve by Italian filmmaker and documentarist Sandro Bocci. The feature is billed as (translated from Italian) “an experimental film orbiting scientific and philosophical reflections on time and space, and that through various shooting techniques, fields of magnification, and an exciting soundtrack, weaves a web between science and magic.” The section shown here depicts beautiful macro timelapses of coral, sponges and other aquatic wildlife filmed under ultraviolet light. You can see additional stills from the upcoming film here. Music by Maurizio Morganti. (via Vimeo Staff Picks, Coudal)

Honey on Tap: A New Beehive that Automatically Extracts Honey without Disturbing Bees

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The Flow Hive is a new beehive invention that promises to eliminate the more laborious aspects of collecting honey from a beehive with a novel spigot system that taps into specially designed honeycomb frames. Invented over the last decade by father and son beekeepers Stuart and Cedar Anderson, the system eliminates the traditional process of honey extraction where frames are removed from beehives, opened with hot knives, and loaded into a machine that uses centrifugal force to get the honey out. Here is how the Andersons explain their design:

The Flow frame consists of already partly formed honeycomb cells. The bees complete the comb with their wax, fill the cells with honey and cap the cells as usual. When you turn the tool, a bit like a tap, the cells split vertically inside the comb forming channels allowing the honey to flow down to a sealed trough at the base of the frame and out of the hive while the bees are practically undisturbed on the comb surface.

When the honey has finished draining you turn the tap again in the upper slot resets the comb into the original position and allows the bees to chew the wax capping away, and fill it with honey again.

It’s difficult to say how this might scale up for commercial operations, but for urban or backyard beekeeping it seems like a whole lot of fun. It wouldn’t be hard to imagine these on the roof of a restaurant where honey could be extracted daily, or for use by kids or others who might be more squeamish around live bees. You can see more on their website and over on Facebook.

Update: The Flow Hive is currently seeking funding on IndieGogo. So far they’ve raised $1.8 million in 16 hours.

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Hand-painted Ceramic Plate Installations by Molly Hatch

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Quand on Aime Tout est Plaisir: After Fragonard, USA, 2013

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Quand on Aime Tout est Plaisir: After Fragonard, USA, 2013

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Recite, USA, 2014. 199 hand-thrown porcelain porcelain plates with glaze and underglaze, acrylic paint, hardware.

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Recite, detail.

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Covet Project, 2012.

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Covet Project, 2012.

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Deconstructed Lace: After Royal Copenhagen, USA, 2014. 93 hand-thrown and hand-painted porcelain plates with glaze and underglaze.

Massachusetts-based artist Molly Hatch creates immense installations of hand-built ceramic plates painted with a variety of patterns and scenes. Hatch frequently re-contextualizes historic images used centuries ago by old porcelain manufactures as well as paintings and textiles. Her largest artwork to date, Physic Garden, was installed last year at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, a monumental installation of 475 plates depicting imagery used on Chelsea Factory plates dating back to the 1750s. Hatch is represented by Todd Merrill Studio, and you can see more work on her website. (via Design*Sponge, My Amp Goes to 11)

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New Three-Dimensional Figurative Collages Encased in Multiple Layers of Glass by Dustin Yellin

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

The Brooklyn-based artist Dustin Yellin (previously) was commissioned by the New York City Ballet to install a new series of his figurative collages. The artist refers to the sculptures as Psychogeographies because “they feel like maps of the psyche.”

Each large-scale sculpture is individually embellished with bizarre found objects—cut-up books, magazines and trash found on the street—which are then sealed within layers of glass. “Imagine if you were to make a drawing on a window,” said Yellin, explaining his process. “And then you were to take another window and glue it to that window… until you had a window sandwich. I make window sandwiches.”

The resulting forms resemble dancers striking various poses: their multi-dimensional bodies encapsulated in suspended animation. A grand total of 15 of these “window sandwiches,” each weighing in at 3,000 pounds each, were installed in the atrium of the David H. Koch Theater at Lincoln Center. The installation is on view for all performances through March 1, 2015 but there’s also free public viewing through February 22. If you can’t make it you can always follow Yellin’s activities on Instagram.

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by Andrew Romer Photography courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

Photo by David Deng courtesy the artist

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