Art

Chaotic Swarms of Flowers and Birds Inhabit New Paintings by Collin van der Sluijs

June 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The last party" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“The last party” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

In his latest solo exhibition, No ConcessionsCollin van der Sluijs (previously) combined acrylic, ink, and spray paint to produce dreamlike portraits of invented characters who each interact with chaotic elements of nature. A skeleton wearing a small brimmed hat extends a hand to a pair of airborne birds, while a mass of flowers and vines consume the head of a suited figure like a locust swarm. Chaos is also seen in the works without human subjects, such as his work Spring which showcases two rabbits dueling over a roaring flame.

No Concessions runs through June 23, 2018 at Vertical Gallery in Chicago. You can see a combination of van der Sluijs’s street art and gallery exhibitions on his Instagram.

"Swarm" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“Swarm” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

"Failures 1.0" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“Failures 1.0” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

"Bloom and decay" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

“Bloom and decay” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 70 inches

"Spring" (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 110 inches

“Spring” (2018), Acrylics, ink and spray paint on canvas, 54 x 110 inches

Left: “Floater” (2017), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 24 x 19 ¾ inches. Right: “Trespassing” (2017), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 24 x 19 ¾ inches

Untitled 07 (2018), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 8 ½ x 11 ½ inches. Right: Untitled 06 (2018), Watercolor and Ink on 300 Grams Paper, 8 ½ x 11 ½ inches

Install view of Collin van der Sluijs’s solo exhibition “No Concessions” at Vertical Gallery

 

 



Art

Recycled Bamboo Installations Intertwine in Site-Specific Configurations by Tanabe Chikuunsai IV

June 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Photo © Éric Sander

Japanese artist Tanabe Chikuunsai IV produces twisting installations of woven bamboo that meld into their environment’s floor and ceiling. To bend the durable material he first moistens each piece to achieve the perfect curve, and often recycles the same pieces of bamboo for future installations. In 2017 the artist constructed a site-specific piece titled The Gate at The Metropolitan Museum of Art. The work used tiger bamboo that had been used ten times, including in a piece shown at the Museé Guimet in Paris.

“Technique and skill and spirit are important,” Chikuunsai IV told The Sculpture Center last summer. “My parents taught me that this spirit is more important than technique. Using bamboo, I try to keep the spirit and tradition in my heart as I create new work.”

The art form was past down to Chikuunsai IV from a long line of bamboo craftsman, including his father. Formally he earned a degree in sculpture from Tokyo University of the Arts, and trained in bamboo crafts at a school in Beppu on the island of Kyushu, Japan. Chikuunsai has a sculpture currently on view at the historic estate Domaine de Chaumont-sur-Loire (thnx Helen!). You can see a time lapse video of last year’s installation at The Met on the museum’s Youtube channel. (via I Need A Guide)

Photo © Éric Sander

Photo © Éric Sander

Photo © Éric Sander

Photo © Éric Sander

 

 



Amazing Science

The Science Behind Incredible Bubbles Explained by Pro Bubbler Melody Yang

June 14, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

With a lifetime of bubble experience under her belt, Melody Yang of the Gazillion Bubbles Show shows the method behind the madness. Much of the formula and nuances of technique are, unsurprisingly, proprietary. But the video above, from Wired, is a fun look behind the scenes as Yang demonstrates her expertise and shares some stories of her career as a bubble engineer. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art

Human Limbs Mysteriously Emerge from Marble Slabs in Milena Naef’s Performative Sculptures

June 14, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographs by Lisa-Marie Vlietstra and Alice Trimouille

Milena Naef juxtaposes the manufactured shapes of marble slabs with the organic forms of the human figure in her performative sculptural works. In her series ‘Fleeting Parts,’ the artist removes portions of Cristallina marble to create openings that are perfectly shaped to allow arms, legs, and torsos to emerge.

Naef, who lives and works in Amsterdam, describes her work in a statement: “Once tangible, the interaction with the concrete material allows for a space to ‘open’ in which a given context can be changed. The body itself with its physical presence and its absence becomes a vital aspect of the work. When do structures inhibit or liberate us and our physical form? What is the consequence of the fact that our bodies are always ‘filling space’?”

The artist’s solo show is on view through August 20, 2018, at Studio Oliver Gustav in Copenhagen, and she will also be exhibiting work at the Garage Rotterdam museum from August 31 to October 28, 2018. You can see more of her work on Instagram. (via I Need A Guide)

 

 



Art Photography

Remote Landscapes and Abandoned Structures Momentarily Transformed by Colorful Plumes of Smoke

June 13, 2018

Anna Marks

Billowing clouds of smoke burst upon rugged mountainous terrains, deserted architecture, and blossoming fields. These vibrant, ethereal sceneries are captured by French photographers Isabelle Chapuis and Alexis Pichot and are part of their Blossom project. The duo’s smokey clouds emerge from beautiful landscapes and desolate buildings alike, transforming both natural and abandoned scenes into enchanted spaces of sorcery and wonder.

Chapuis and Pichot’s collaborative project is a celebration of the beauty of natural forms, of what nature grows into without humankind’s influence. Each cloud is created by adding colored pigments to smoke including pastel pinks, vivid blues, dark greens, and creamy yellows. The duo captures the resulting colorful scene scene with a Nikon D810 camera.

The project is set in various parts of the globe including the US, Morocco, Turkey, and Norway, each of which has unique natural topography. The clouds take different forms depending on the landscape. In one photo a mustard yellow cloud resembles volcanic smoke, yet in another, a cloud looks like an peach-hued spiritual form haunting an old industrial site.

With ‘Blossom’, the artists share with Colossal that they seek to illustrate a visual manifestation of humanity’s creative impulse, and to raise awareness on the interventions of mankind in territory. “If people are absent from these photographs, their imprint is suggested among these wild natural or abandoned landscapes,” states Chapuis.

To view more of Chapuis and Pichot’s work visit their website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

A Towering Wooden Sculpture by Daniel Popper Welcomes Beachgoers in Tulum

June 13, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

South African artist Daniel Popper, known for his massive figurative sculptures, has constructed a new artwork as part of an arts and culture festival in Tulum, Mexico. The towering installation is titled Ven a la Luz (come into the light), and is comprised of wood and rope formed into a female figure. Her torso is filled with lush green plants, which creates an archway for viewers to walk through.

Ven a La luz will be permanently installed at the resort Ahau Tulum now that the inaugural festival, Art With Me, has concluded. As Tulum’s popularity for vacationing has exploded over the last several years, development and cultural investment has dramatically increased in the area. Recently, a member of the famed Guggenheim family built an art gallery using a similar rustic, curvilinear style to Popper’s festival-friendly sculpture. You can see more of Popper’s large-scale sculptures on his website and Instagram. (via Street Art News)

 

 



Amazing Photography

Unique Weathering Pattern Creates Fascinating Geometric Ripples on a Chain Link Fence

June 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All images published with the photographer’s permission

Over the past few years, Twitter user @Ben_On_The_Moon has photographed his chain link fence due to a mysterious weathering pattern that has caused groups of concentric rings to appear on the upper side of the fence’s segments. His macro photographs emphasize the intriguing apparitions, which appear like miniature crop circles on the metal bars. Despite his research, he has not discovered the specific cause of the pattern. You can see more of @Ben_On_The_Moon’s documentation of the curious phenomena on Twitter. (via Kottke)