Colossal x Maja Wronska: Modern City Watercolor Series 

Poland-based watercolor artist and architect Maja Wronska has wowed us before with her vibrant depictions of urban landscapes. Whereas most of her previous work highlighted architectural features from centuries past, recently the artist has found new focus and energy in the dense environments of more contemporary cityscapes. Hundreds of windows hover above gridded streets and prism-shaped buildings rise above bridges and freeways, while water and earth offer a subtle topographic frame. Wrońska’s confident, consistent hand and imaginative use of color capture the organic energy that makes cities come alive.

Colossal has partnered with Maja Wrońska to create three archival prints from her Modern City Series: Tokyo, Chicago, and Frankfurt. Working with the experts at ioLabs in Rhode Island, we’ve matched the artist’s original color and paper for a print that looks like it’s fresh off Wrońska’s easel. Each city is available in two sizes; all include a two inch border for convenient framing, and are printed with Moab Entrada Natural Textured 100% rag 300 gsm archival paper. Available only in The Colossal Shop.

Three-Dimensional Hoop Embroidery Accented With Clay by Justyna Wołodkiewicz 

Artist Justyna Wołodkiewicz mixes embroidery with abstract clay forms in order to produce three-dimensional works that spring from traditional hoops. The pieces weave together bold threads with equally bright polymer clay shapes, creating multi-textured surfaces from the diverse materials.

The artist typically starts with a miniature sketch before embarking on molding the clay structures she wishes to include in each piece, stitching the final clay works into the surface of the embroidered hoop. Wołodkiewicz sells her works on her Etsy shop “Nibyniebo” which means “just like the sky.” You can see more of her sculptural embroidery on her Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal Submissions)

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A Large Suspended Tree Trunk Carved Down to a Frayed Rope by Maskull Lasserre 

Schrodinger’s Wood. Ash tree trunk, chain hoist, gantry. 156 x 16 x 15 inches

If you had to summarize an all-encompassing theme to describe Maskull Lasserre’s artistic practice, the word would probably be tension. From the balance of life and death to the opposing forces of war and peace, the Candian artist explores tension not only metaphorically but physically as well. Case in point, his latest piece titled Schrodinger’s Wood carved from the trunk of an Ash tree that relies on the tree’s inner core to serve as a tangled mass of rope in the process of fraying from the weight of itself. The work appears to share a kindred spirit to his sliced piano artwork, Improbable Worlds. You can see more views on his website.

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Rock Sculptures Suspended Within Bell Jars by Their Own Weight by Dan Grayber 

Cavity Mechanism #12 w/ Glass Dome. 2013. Mixed. 23″ x 13″ x 13″. All images via Dan Grayber.

Dan Grayber‘s works exist at the intersection of sculpture and physics, pieces carefully designed to solve the problems created by their own existence. The sculptures each include a rock suspended within a glass enclosure, the rock’s weight perfectly balanced by the mechanisms, systems, and pulleys that surround it.

Grayber relates this play of tension and balance to personal relationships, which serves as another influence to his work outside of visual interests in industrial design, construction machinery, and the children’s game Cat’s Cradle.

Cavity Mechanism #6, from 2009, [seen below] is one of the most obvious pieces to speak about interpersonal relationships that I’ve made,” said Grayber to Venison Magazine. “There are two identical mechanisms inside of a glass display dome, and one small cable that runs between the two mechanisms. This cable holds all of the tension between the two mechanisms, and they both need to remain in place to maintain the tension. I was really thinking about co-dependence when I made the piece. If either mechanism were to slip, or the connection between them to break, it would cause both to fail.”

You can see more of Grayber’s experiments in equilibrium on his Instagram and Facebook. (via Boing Boing and Makezine)

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13" x 14" x 14".

Cavity Mechanism #21. 2016. Mixed. 13″ x 14″ x 14″

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5" x 6.5" x 6.5".

Cavity Mechanism #24. 2016. Mixed. 13.5″ x 6.5″ x 6.5″

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #18. 2015. Mixed. 11″ x 5″ x 5″

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5" x 5" x 5"

Cavity Mechanism #23. 2016. Mixed. 7.5″ x 5″ x 5″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5" x 16" x 11"

Display Case Mechanism #6. 2016. Mixed. 24.5″ x 16″ x 11″

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5" x 12" x 12".

Cavity Mechanism #20. 2016. Mixed. 29.5″ x 12″ x 12″

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A Mixture of Paint, Soap, and Oil Form an Eye-Opening Galaxy of Aqueous Visuals 

Director Thomas Blanchard (previously) has teamed up with photographer Oilhack to create this dizzying new video of paint, soap, and oil mixing together titled Galaxy Gates. We’ve seen more than a handful of videos like these here on Colossal the last few years, but these guys somehow manage to push the envelope quite a bit into an entirely new realm of visual experimentation. The duo filmed for almost 4 months and included only around 2% of their work in the final edit. You can see more of their collaborative work on We Are Color.

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Alexander Semenov Photographs Astonishing Creatures from the Depths of the World’s Oceans 

Pegea confoederata

If you’re like me, the only possible reaction to these recent photographs by marine biologist Alexander Semenov is “What is that? What is that?! WHAT IS THAT!?” Semenov is the head of the diving at Moscow State University’s White Sea Biological Station where he brings nearly a decade of underwater photography experience to a wide variety of research and exploration projects. He focuses mostly on invertebrate animals found in the Arctic ocean: squishy, wiggly, translucent creatures from jellyfish to worms found deep underwater, most of which have never been documented with such detail and clarity.

Semenov shares about his work in an artist statement:

My key specialism is scientific macrophotography in natural environments. This practice makes it possible to observe animals that cannot be properly studied under laboratory conditions, such as soft bodied planktonic organisms or stationary life forms living on the seafloor. My personal goal is to study underwater life through camera lenses and to boost people’s interest in marine biology. I do this by sharing all my finding through social media and in real life through public lectures, movies, exhibitions and media events.

Seen here are a collection of images from the last year including expeditions to the Southern Kuril Islands, the Southern Maldives, the White Sea, and the Mediterranean, but there’s hundreds of additional photos on Flickr.

Clavelina moluccensis

Alitta virens swimming

Siphonophore from the Sea of Okhotsk

Tubastraea faulkneri – Sun Cup coral

Pegea confoederata

Godiva quadricolor

Siphonophore 4

Unidentified hudrozoan jellyfish

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