A Giant LED Star Pierces the Floors of a 4-Story Building in Malaysia 


Malaysian artist Jun Hao Ong constructed this bright LED star that appears to shoot through the floors and ceilings of a 4-story concrete building as part of the 2015 Urban Xchange public art festival. The piece is comprised of steel cables that help suspend a network of over 500 feet of LED lights that grows seamlessly in 12 directions. “The Star is a glitch in current political and cultural climate of the country, it is a manifestation of the sterile conditions of Butterworth, a once thriving industrial port and significant terminal between the mainland and island,” shares Ong.

The Star was curated by Eeyan Chuah and Gabija Grusaite from the Penang-based contemporary art centre, Hin Bus Depot. You can see more of Ong’s elaborate installations using LEDs and flourescent lights on his website. (via The Creators Project)







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The “Sea Organ” Makes Perpetual Music with Ocean Waves 

While many of us are content to listen to the natural sounds of ocean waves, architect Nikola Bašić took things a step further and faciliated a means for ocean currents to produce actual music. Behold: the Sea Organ. Constructed in 2005, the acoustic jetty spans some 230 feet (70 meters) and incorporates 35 polyethylene tubes of varying diameter. As waves flood each tube underwater, displaced air is forced through large whistles tuned to play seven chords of five tones. Day in and day out, music seems to emanate from the ground, a playful interplay between nature and design. Listening to the video above, the sound is somewhat like random chords played by a huge calliope.

linssimato/Flickr. (CC BY-NC-ND 2.0)

Bašić’s Sea Organ won the 2006 European Prize for Urban Public Space, and was inspired by a 1986 piece in San Francisco of similar design called the Wave Organ by Peter Richards and George Gonzalez. (via IFLScience)

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New Nail Sculptures by John Bisbee That Twist Across Floors and Walls 


John Bisbee (previously) has worked with nails as a sculptural medium since he accidentally toppled a bucket of them years ago and was astonished to see how they remained intact, rusted and fused into a single object. Every since, he’s been hammering nails of varying size into complex patterns, using the smallest woodworking nails up to giant 12-inch spikes. Although nails large and small continue to be the focus of his artistic practice, his sculptures remain diverse in their presentation and composition, twisted works making wildly chaotic patterns against walls and neatly arranged nails snaking along gallery floors.

Bisbee currently has two solo exhibitions on view including “Floresco” at the SCAD Museum of Art (through January 3, 2016) and “Only nails, always different” at the PCA&D Gallery (through the end of December). His work is also included in the 2015 Portland Museum of Art Biennial titled “You Can’t Get There From Here” through January 3, 2016.












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New Pet-Friendly Chunky Knits by Anna Mo 



Anna Mo (previously) knits with chunky spools of wool, utilizing giant needles to produces the three-inch stitches that comprise her blankets, wraps, and now tiny pet beds. The animal-focused textiles mimic the appearance of her human accessories, crafted in bright blue, pink, and orange encasements that are perfect for the upcoming winter. Due to the round shape of the beds they even begin to look like spools of yarn themselves, hollowed out to perfectly snuggle your pooch or kitty.

Mo sells her thick knits through her Etsy shop Ohhio, and each of her creations are crafted from 100% merino wool. After first discovering the material Mo would knit with her hands, which gave inspired her large signature loops. She outlines more of her creative process in an endearing and humorous Kickstarter she just launched to help Ohhio expand their line of knit products. See more of her soft creations on her Instagram here. (via My Modern Met)







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Riusuke Fukahori’s Lifelike Goldfish Painted in Acrylic Between Layers of Resin 

Kingyo Sukui (The Ark). Wood, net, aluminum, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 73 x 75 x 38 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Japanese artist Riusuke Fukahori (previously) returns to Joshua Liner Gallery this week for his second solo show, Goldfish Salvation. Fukahori has become widely known for his depiction of aquatic life painted with acrylic within layers of resin, most frequently the forms of goldfish as they swim through small wooden boxes or inside bamboo hats. He references dozens of live fish kept in aquariums in his studio as he works, with some pieces taking several months to gradually complete, layer by layer.

The exhibition’s title, Goldfish Salvation, is a personal reference to a time of self-doubt in Fukahori’s own artistic career, and an important revelation that led him out of it. Goldfish have since become a symbol of identity that represent both the strength and weakness of himself and rest of humanity. He shares:

In the aquarium, similar to human society, there is a story of birth and death. As long as they live, these goldfish will continue to soil the fish tank, and if not changed, the water will only get tainted leading to death for all the goldfish. This is quite true for the human species as well… The goldfish that I paint are not really goldfish, but representations of people. I feel as though the fish tank is only foretelling what would happen to the earth in the future. We as human beings are the main source polluting our own air we breathe.

You can see all of the pieces here, plus a number of large acrylic paintings by Fukahori at Joshua Liner Gallery in New York through December 19th. (via Hi-Fructose)

Kingyo Sukui (The Ark). Wood, net, aluminum, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 73 x 75 x 38 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Kingyo Sukui, detail.

Kingyo Sukui, detail.

Kingyo Sukui, detail.

Four Seasons of Rain – Bosan (Autumn). Japanese bamboo hat, epoxy resin and acrylic on iron stand , 2015. 16 x 7.5 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Four Seasons of Rain – Setcho (Winter). Japanese bamboo hat, epoxy resin and acrylic on iron stand , 2015. 16 x 7.5 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Iwashirogamatsu. Epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 5.5 x 3.5 x 1.75 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Tsuzuki. Japanese Cypress sake cup, resin, acrylic, 2015. 3.5 x 3.5 x 2.2 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Kingyo-sake Kochomatsu. Japanese Cypress sake cup, resin, acrylic, 2015. 3.5 x 3.5 x 2.2 inches. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Spring of the Moon. Tub, ladle, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 13.78 x 12.6 x 9.84 in. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

Spring of the Moon. Tub, ladle, epoxy resin and acrylic, 2015. 13.78 x 12.6 x 9.84 in. Courtesy Joshua Liner Gallery

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Space Glass: Extraordinary Solar Systems and Flowers Encased in Glass by Satoshi Tomizu 


Glass artist Satoshi Tomizu sculpts small glass spheres that appear to contain entire solar systems and galaxies. Planets made of opals, flecks of real gold, and trails of colored glass seem to spin and loop like twists in the Milky Way. While photographed here in a macro view, the pieces are actually quite small and include a small glass loop so each piece can be turned into a pendant. I can’t help but be reminded of this pivotal scene from the acclaimed Men in Black film.

Tomizu’s glass work recently won a Atelier Nova Design Award and appeared at the Handmade in Japan Festival. You can explore much more of his work in this Facebook gallery and on his website. (via My Modern Met)














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Short Edition: A Short Story Vending Machine that Prints Free Stories On-Demand 


Need to kill a few minutes while waiting for a bus or train? Instead of mindlessly staring at your phone or twiddling your thumbs, why not print out a quick short story. A small start-up in Grenoble, France aims to do just that with the Short Edition vending machine. The machines were conceived by Short Edition co-founder Christophe Sibieude who was standing in front of a traditional candy vending machine and questioned if there might be a better way to pass the time other than snacking.

So far, eight of the minimalistic vending machines have been installed around the city, each of which has three buttons that correlate with how much reading time you have to spare: 1, 3, or 5 minutes. The stories print instantly on narrow receipt paper which makes for easy reading and storage. The randomly printed stories are written by the Short Edition community, and also include poems and other forms of experimental short fiction.

If you liked this, also check out the Biblio-Mat. (via Hyperallergic)




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