Playfully Embroidered X-Ray Film by Matthew Cox 

MatthewCox_05

“Daisy Bracelet” All images provided by Matthew Cox.

Adding a touch of softness to stark images of knees, skulls, and chests, Matthew Cox uses bright thread to embroider on X-ray film. His additions add a playful fiction to the cold reality of the transparent film, giving body parts the faces of Greek gods and limbs of anger-prone superheroes. Each stitch on the medical photograph acts as a line for Cox, a labored drawing produced from vibrant thread.

The Philadelphia-based artist enjoys the contrast of his two chosen materials, redefining each of their roles through their unique combination. “By joining the cold, blue, medically-technical plastic of the X-ray with the colorful, decorative and tactile embroidery thread, each is removed from its original intention and creates a new entity,” said Cox. “Handling these media also gives me an opportunity to comment on the ever-increasing presence of photography in contemporary art by introducing labor over the quick, slickness of film.”

Cox’s will show a selection of his embroidered works this summer at Sweden’s Fiberspace. You can see more of his works on his Instagram here. (via Booooooom)

MatthewCox_14

“Lotus With Butterfly Necklace”

MatthewCox_09

“Wading Knees”

MatthewCox_20

“Avatar #7, Zeus/Hulk”

MatthewCox_08

“Medusa Profile”

MatthewCox_15

“Avatar #2, Minotaur”

MatthewCox_16

“Knee and Daisies”

MatthewCox_13

“Waterproof Watches”

MatthewCox_07

“Lashes and Earrings”

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Architectural Watercolors of a Dreamlike Warsaw by Tytus Brzozowski 

tytus-1

Architect and watercolorist Tytus Brzozowski imagines a dreamlike world where giant structures rest on towering stilts and trains seem to emerge from tunnels in the side of residential buildings. Unusual motifs like dice and teapots dot the landscape (or float through the air), and yet everything seems in its place, a credibility attributed to elements lifted directly from the architecture seen on the streets of Warsaw, Poland. Brzozowski refers to his watercolor paintings as “the city of his dreams,” and just as dreams seem to defy space and time, his paintings bring together elements of the present and past. You can see more of his work on Facebook and many of his pieces are available as prints through Lumarte. (via Colossal Submissions)

tytus-2

tytus-3

tytus-4

tytus-5

tytus-6

tytus-7

tytus-8

tytus-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

X-Ray Photographs From the 1930s Expose the Delicate Details of Roses and Lilies 

Tasker_02

“Lotus,” ca. 1930, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/4 inches. All imagery courtesy Joseph Bellows Gallery.

When selecting flowers we are often first attracted to their vibrant colors, eager to choose a bright orange lily or deep red rose. Dr. Dain L. Tasker, an early 20th century radiologist, was attracted to a different feature of the blooms—their anatomy. Using X-ray film to highlight the soft layering of petals and leaves, Tasker produced ghostly images devoid of color, each image appearing more like an ink drawing than photograph.

Born in 1872 in Beloit, Wisconsin, Tasker was the chief radiologist at the Wilshire Hospital in Los Angeles when radiology was in its first stages of exploration. He first became interested in photography in the 20s, focusing his hobby on landscape and portraiture. It wasn’t until the the 30s that he began to connect his career and hobby, moving his photographic interests to the X-ray machine and singling out flowers from his previously photographed landscape environments.

By composing images with singular flowers Taker examined their individualistic qualities rather than focusing on how they might be found grouped in nature or a bouquet. These minimal compositions contain a romantic appreciation for his subject matter. “Flowers are the expression of the love life of plants,” he said in a statement.

A selection of Tasker’s X-ray images can be seen in the exhibition “Floral Studies” at Joseph Bellows Gallery in La Jolla, California which runs through February 19, 2016. (via Hyperallergic)

Tasker_04

“A Rose,” 1936, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

Tasker_15

“Yellow Calla Lily,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/4 inches

Tasker_14

“untitled, (lily),” 1932, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 inches

Tasker_11

“Philodendron,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 inches

Tasker_10

“Peruvian Daffodil,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/2 x 9 1/4 inches

Tasker_09

“Fuchsia,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 1/2 x 7 1/4 inches

Tasker_06

“Delphinium,” 1938, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 1/4 x 9 1/8 inches

Tasker_01

“Tulip,” 1931, vintage gelatin silver print, 9 x 7 inches

Tasker_03

“California Holly,” 1937, vintage gelatin silver print, 11 3/8 x 9 1/8 inches

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Artist Samantha Keely Smith Explores Powerful Collisions of Dark and Light in Her Abstract Elemental Paintings 

keely-1

Yield, 54″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2014.

When encountering paintings by artist Samantha Keely Smith (previously) it’s nearly impossible to escape the mystery and gravity depicted by a violent clash of abstract brush strokes. Ocean waves crash atop foreboding bodies of water, plumes of fire seem to battle clouds in the sky, and swirling storms shield distant secrets just over the horizon. Smith refers to her paintings as ‘internal landscapes,’ part of an ongoing examination of an externalized inner conflict. “My newer works try to boldly portray the struggle I’ve always tried to address in my work between order and chaos, dark and light, and positive and negative impulses,” Smith shares, “along with addressing what feels like a shifting and unpredictable landscape due to global warming.”

You can see a gallery of her most recent paintings on her website and follow progress in her studio via Instagram.

keely-2

Headlong, 56″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

keely-3

Crux, 50″ x 60″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

keely-4

Interference, 56″ x 60″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

keely-5

Manifold, 60″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

keely-6

Clearing, 56″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

keely-7

Issue, 60″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2015.

keely-8

Pulse, 60″ x 72″, oil and varnish on canvas, 2016.

portrait

Samantha in the studio working on Kindred, 2011. Photo by Thomas Feiner.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Sponsor // Sketch Lively Urban Spaces With 50% Off This Online Craftsy Class 

Explore cities and towns through an artist’s eye, and start sketching urban spaces pulsing with energy and movement. Join Urban Sketchers correspondent James Richards, for his online Craftsy class, Essential Techniques for Sketching the Energy of Places. Receive 50% off James’s video lessons—a special, one-week offer for Colossal readers—and capture your favorite urban scenes.

With lifetime access to these video lessons, you can bring vibrant urban scenes to life. James will demonstrate how to quickly draw people in the city, sketch the backdrop elements of an urban scene and create an illusion of depth. You’ll also discover how to use composition, exaggerated perspective, exciting linework and bold color to capture the exuberance of great places in your town and around the world!

Visit Craftsy now to get 50% off the online class, Essential Techniques for Sketching the Energy of Places, and enjoy your video lessons risk-free with Craftsy’s full money-back guarantee. Offer expires February 8, 2016 at 11:59pm MT.

New Highlights from Artist Tatsuya Tanaka’s Daily Miniature Photo Project 

earth

Japanese art director Tatsuya Tanaka (previously) continues to entertain us with his ongoing miniature photo project, now stretching into its fifth year. Tanaka uses office supplies, food, and other found objects that he utilizes as set pieces or backdrops for miniature inhabitants. You would think his desire to continue the project would diminish after surpassing 1,000 photos or that his imagination would be completely tapped, but that’s clearly not the case. You can see new images from the Miniature Calendar project every single day on Instagram and Facebook.

4-up

11040379_915291761870155_3961212367655921619_o

11951626_906781546054510_7876301506196264464_o

12028641_914558151943516_4894821369354642666_o

12029560_908319599234038_3516932089144797129_o

12109989_916550941744237_6356064814248693677_o

12141035_918088564923808_5363620645572297852_o

12489379_956302084435789_6095939692742195611_o

12525512_969321639800500_6716984042494952630_o

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Taxi Fabric Fills Plain Cab Interiors with Vibrant Original Artworks 

taxi-12

‘A Century of Revolt’ Taxi Fabric interior designed by Kunel Guar.

When thinking of decor inside an American taxicab, your imagination is probably limited to an LED payment screen blaring annoying ads and maybe a pine tree air freshener dangling from a rearview mirror. In India, a new firm is thinking a bit more creatively by helping cab drivers completely transform the interior of their taxis with original art by local designers. Mumbai-based Taxi Fabric creates cloth interiors printed with vibrant designs that cover nearly every inch of a vehicle’s interior from the ceiling to the door panels and even the seats themselves.

Taxi Fabric is an interesting hybrid of interior design, advertising, and promotion of local culture, with a number of benefits both to the cab driver and the artists. Drivers report that after applying the designs to their vehicles, passengers often tip more and remain in the cabs longer. Artists in turn have their work seen by a large new audience and are easily identified by a prominent label on the back of every seat.

From the Taxi Fabric website:

Taxis in India, particularly in Mumbai, are not only the most convenient form of transport but have also become an iconic piece of culture. Although much attention is given to each taxi by its driver – to make it stand out from his competitors – very little thought is given to the fabric used on the seats. The designs that cover the taxi seats are often functional and forgettable and with the outstanding design talent Mumbai has to offer, this shouldn’t be the case.

Design, as a job or even simply something studied at school, is unfortunately not widely recognised in India. Older generations don’t understand it- design to them, just performs a function. Many people don’t know that design can create a real impact. With so few spaces for young people to show off their skills, it’s hard to change that perception.

There are dozens of interior designs currently installed in taxis and rickshaws across Mumbai. You can explore more of them on their Tumblr. (via The Creator’s Project)

taxi-10

taxi-11

taxi-1

taxi-2

taxi-3

taxi-4

taxi-5

taxi-6

taxi-7

taxi-8

taxi-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

Page 3 of 600«...2345...»