Art

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Art

Domestic Sculptures Formed With Wood Grown at the United States and Mexico Border by Hugh Hayden

September 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"America" (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Texas-born sculptor Hugh Hayden (previously) combines different varieties of wood to create furniture and other domestic objects with protruding spikes and branches. For his latest exhibition Border States at Lisson Gallery in New York City, Hayden addresses notions of citizenship and boundaries with sculptures made using wood indigenous to the United States and Mexico border. The traditional family ideals of the American Dream are evoked in objects such as a dining room table, picket fence, and child’s stroller, yet their source material speaks to the contentious practices upheld at our nation’s border.

Eastern Red Cedar, a wood from Texas with a pinkish interior, composes 
The Jones Part 3, a fence covered in branches which reach out at the audience from its vertical slats. “Texas Ebony,” a dark wood that grows at the border, composes another sculpture, while the weed-like Mesquite forms a kitchen table and chairs titled America.

Hayden currently lives and works in New York City. Border States runs at Lisson Gallery through October 27, 2018. You can see more of his politically-minded sculptures on his website and Instagram.

"America" (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“America” (detail) (2018), 
Sculpted mesquite (Prosopis glandulosa) on plywood, 
overall dimensions: 43 1/4 x 81 x 81 in
, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"Cable News" (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Cable News” (2018
), Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) with mirror and hardware, 
101 x 31 1/2 x 19 1/2 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.<span style="color: #444444; font-size: 1rem;"> </span>

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery. 

"
The Jones Part 3" (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“
The Jones Part 3” (2018), 
Sculpted eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) with steel
, 78 1/2 x 180 x 26 3/4 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

Installation view of Hugh Hayden: Border States at Lisson Gallery, New York (15 September – 27 October 2018). © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery.

"Untitled (Wagon)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (Wagon)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei)
, 100 x 89 x 65 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

"Untitled (French gothic picket)" (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

“Untitled (French gothic picket)” (2018), 
Sculpted post cedar (Juniperus ashei) on plywood
, 
68 x 98 x 59 in, © Hugh Hayden; Courtesy Lisson Gallery

 

 



Art Craft Design

Native Argentinean Landscapes Explored in New Hand-Tufted Rugs by Alexandra Kehayoglou

September 20, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Santa Cruz River" (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm, Presented at National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) Triennial | Melbourne, Australia 2018. Commissioned and acquired by the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne.

“Santa Cruz River” (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm, Courtesy of The National Gallery of Victoria.

Textile artist Alexandra Kehayoglou (previously) creates functional works of art that explore the natural landscapes of her native Argentina. Her selected locations are often ones tied to political controversy, such as the Santa Cruz River, or areas dramatically altered by human activity, such as the Raggio creek. Kehayoglou uses her craft as a chance as a call for environmental awareness, embedding her own memory and research of the disappearing waterways and grasslands into her hand-tufted works.

Each tapestry uses surplus materials from her family’s factory, which has manufactured industrial carpets for more than six decades. The one-of-a-kind carpets are often installed against the wall, with a section of the work trailing along the floor so visitors can walk or lay on the woven rugs.

In December 2017, her piece Santa Cruz River was included in the National Gallery of Victoria Triennial in Melbourne. The installation showcased her research behind the future damming of the river and her own interpretation of the harm that will continue to influence the surrounding area. Later this month Kehayoglou will present a new site-specific tapestry that explores the tribes of Patagonia in the group exhibition Dream at the Chiostro del Bramante in Rome. You can see more of her work on her website and Instagram.

"Santa Cruz River" detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

“Santa Cruz River” detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

"Santa Cruz River" detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

“Santa Cruz River” detail (2016-2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 980 x 420 cm

"Hope the voyage is a long one" (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

“Hope the voyage is a long one” (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

"Hope the voyage is a long one" (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

“Hope the voyage is a long one” (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool

"No Longer Creek" (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 820 x 460 cm, Presented at Design Miami/ Basel, 2016 | Basel, Switzerland. Commissioned by Artsy. Courtesy of Artsy & The National Gallery of Victoria.

“No Longer Creek” (2016), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 820 x 460 cm, Presented at Design Miami/ Basel, 2016 | Basel, Switzerland. Commissioned by Artsy. Courtesy of Artsy & The National Gallery of Victoria.

"Santa Cruz River II" (2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 205 x 150 cm

“Santa Cruz River II” (2017), Textile tapestry (handtuft system), wool, 205 x 150 cm

 

 



Art Illustration

Nuanced Portraits of Women Merged With Abstract Environments by Sofia Bonati

September 19, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Self-taught artist Sofia Bonati captures nuanced expressions and personalities of a variety of female characters while also integrating them into abstracted environments and patterns. Her illustrations most often feature solo subjects melded with thunderclouds, dizzying mazes, and floral patterns. Bonita renders the women’s features in graphite and she uses gesso, paint, and markers to add colorful accents and build their surroundings. The strong, distinctive expressions on each woman’s face suggests that the characters are in control of their environments, rather than being subsumed by them.

In a recent collaboration with Society6, several of the Argentinian artist’s works have been animated by glitch artist Chris McDaniel. You can see more of Bonita’s work on Facebook and Instagram, and find a variety of products featuring her designs on Society6. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Art Craft History

A Peculiar Character From a Hieronymus Bosch Painting Comes to Life on the New York City Subway

September 19, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Rae Swon recently brought a fantastical creature from The Temptation of St. Anthony to life on the New York City subway. The triptych painting created by Hieronymus Bosch in the early 16th century includes a small, peculiar figure on the left-hand triptych (detail below). The character has bird-like facial features, and is wearing what appear to be ice skates and a funnel as a hat. After creating the modern-day costume using needle felting and other found materials, Swon took her character for a subway ride through Manhattan. Although this particular costume is sold out, you can see more of Swon’s fantastical felted creations like a Starling Coin Purse and an Opposum Purse on Instagram and Etsy. (via Hyperallergic)

Detail of Hieronymus Bosch’s “The Temptation of St. Anthony”

Hieronymus Bosch’s “The Temptation of St. Anthony”

 

 



Art

The Human Figure Takes Shape in New Steel, Graphite, and Gypsum Sculptures by Emil Alzamora

September 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The human figure is the through line of sculptor Emil Alzamora‘s emotive work previously covered both here and here. The body’s many poses and positions are explored in his multi-material practice which uses gypsum, graphite, stainless steel, and more to create his often life-size works. “I like to explore both material and form as well as the seemingly infinite sculpting processes to discover new visual narratives about life and art,” he tells Colossal. “Sometimes I will distort the figure, or encapsulate it or erode it depending on the material and the feeling am looking to capture.”

Alzamora is a British citizen born in Peru, who was raised in the United States and Spain and now lives and works in New York City. He will have upcoming solo exhibitions with Pontone Gallery in London next May, and Krause Gallery on New York City’s Lower East Side in the fall. You can see more of his sculptural works on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Swirling Networks of Sliced Paper Emerge From Altered Secondhand Books by Barbara Wildenboer

September 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Barbara Wildenboer (previously) delicately cuts and extracts the pages of old books to produce sculptural explorations of the contents inside. Thinly sliced paper fragments frame world maps found in old atlases or appear like a nervous system in an altered copy of Functional Neuroanatomy. The works are part of an ongoing project titled the Library of the Infinitesimally Small and Unimaginable Large, to which she has been contributing altered books since 2011. The series uses the site of the library as a metaphor for the larger universe, while also focusing on the decrease of printed materials as a result of the digital age.

“Through the act of altering books and other paper based objects the intention is to draw emphasis to our understanding of history as mediated through text or language and our understanding of the abstract terms of science through metaphor,” Wildenboer explains on her website.

The Cape Town-based artist sources her books and maps from secondhand bookshops and flea markets from around the world, looking specifically for publications that have illustrations, paper quality, and subject matter that might be interesting to slice and transform. This November she will open a solo exhibition at Everard Read Gallery in Johannesburg which will be followed by another solo exhibition in March 2019 at the their London location. You can see more of her paper-based sculptures and collages on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

A Large-Scale Flocked Steel Mural Accented With Live Foliage by Frank Plant

September 17, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Sculptor Frank Plant (previously) creates large-scale sculptural drawings of grouped bodies made from flocked steel. One of his most recent pieces, Grow, presents two groups of students engaged in casual conversation. The green-flocked individuals sit together on the ground with accessories such as backpacks and lunch boxes resting casually at their side. The artist lent an added touch to his typical work style for this mural by installing live plants as stand-ins for the students’ hair. The public work was created for Wageningen University in the Netherlands, a top university for agricultural and earth sciences. You can see more of the Barcelona-based artist’s work on his website and Behance.

 

 

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