Art

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Art

Walk Inside a Warehouse-Sized Kaleidoscopic Painting by Katharina Grosse

January 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest work by German artist Katharina Grosse encompasses an entire warehouse, transforming its raw interior into a soft maze of kaleidoscopic color. The installation, titled The Horse Trotted Another Couple of Metres, Then it Stopped, responds to the architecture of Sydney’s contemporary art center Carriageworks, filling the industrial space with nearly 90,000 square feet of painted fabric.

“I was fascinated by the thought of folding space,” explained Grosse in a statement about the work. “I was interested in taking this vast surface and shrinking it by folding or, actually, hiding the entirety of what’s there. I understand a painting as something that, as we view it, travels through us and realigns our connections with the world.”

To produce the piece Grosse first suspended the multitude of fabric from Carriageworks’ ceiling, creating a series of drapes and folds. The artist then used a spray gun to paint the work in a series of gestural strokes, creating an immersive site-specific environment that obscures the historic building’s architecture in a dense mass of swirling color.

The work was mounted as a part of Sydney Festival 2018, and is on view through April 8, 2018. You can view more of Grosse’s large-scale paintings (including this 2016 in situ installation at Rockaway Beach) on her website.  (via Juxtapoz)

 

 



Art

A Relaxing Video Demonstrates the Detailed Steps of Making Paper by Hand

January 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Chinese vlogger Li Ziqi films her videos in the serene countryside of China, demonstrating step-by-step instructions for making traditional recipes such as fresh pomelo honey and Lanzhou beef noodles. In one of her most recent videos Li presents the days long process of traditional Chinese paper making, a process which can be traced back to the early years of the Han Dynasty sometime within the 2nd century BC.

The soothing video weaves together the necessary steps for making paper from scratch. During the video Li strictly adheres to the ancient process, using only basic tools such as fire and a mortar and pestle to transform the raw bark. After cutting down a few trees for the paper, Li then cuts and mashes the trunks into pulp, solidifying the consistency of the solution through several rounds of soaking and drying. You can watch the entirety of the demonstration above (along with a surprising twist ending), and view more of Li’s relaxing instructionals on her Youtube channel. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art Illustration

Miniature Paintings on Tea Bags by Ruby Silvious

January 18, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Some of us may give our used tea bags a second life by squeezing an extra steep out of them, but Ruby Silvious takes things a step further by using the thin paper as a canvas for miniature paintings. Silvious mirrors the simple ritual of tea drinking in quiet paintings that show slices of everyday life, like laundry drying and cats looking out the window.

The artist began her initial year-long series of paintings in January 2015. Since then, Silvious has compiled that year into a book, and traveled to Japan and southern France for month-long sessions of tea drinking and painting. Her work is included in a group show “Deemed a Canvas” at Paradigm Gallery in Philadelphia, which opens on January 26th. You can see more of Silvious’ work on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art

The Surreal Objects of Nancy Fouts

January 17, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Everyday objects take an unusual turn in Nancy Fouts‘ bizarre sculptures. Playing with unexpected combinations of violence and peace, the natural and manmade, interiors and exteriors, Fouts challenges viewers to rethink the categories we habitually place different objects in. The American-born, London-based artist studied at the Chelsea School of Art and the Royal College of Art. Prints of some works are available on Artsy and you can meet Fouts in the video below by Black Rat Projects.

 

 



Art

Strange Mess: Puddles of Skies and Galaxies by Jeffrey Michael Austin

January 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Chicago-based artist Jeffrey Michael Austin spends a lot of time photographing the puddles that collect on his city’s sidewalks and streets, observing the mirror-like quality that occurs when the sun hits the water at just the right angle. Eager to remake these special moments of reflection, Austin began creating his own sculptural puddles that appear to reflect the sky above. The works incorporate small bits of debris to strengthen the work’s illusion, while also adding to the quotidian nature of each false pool.

“The Puddles came from my desire to make work that at first glance feels mundane and unassuming, a candid situation you wouldn’t immediately regard as or associate with an art experience,” said Austin. “I’d hoped that in this way they would gently present themselves as yet another detail of your natural environment, before then unfurling with a kind of subtle and surprising magic — an extraordinary quality that you have to grapple with for a moment before facing it with any criticality.”

Austin likes to present his puddles in their “natural habitat” so they are not initially read as art. He hopes his small reflections of the sky (and more recently galaxies) spark a moment of curiosity in the audience they reach, making one rethink their expectations of the surrounding world.

You can view more of Austin’s in situ puddle sculptures, as well as browse a selection of the artist’s candid puddle photography on his Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

Abstracted Street Puddles Awash in Neon by Slava Semeniuta

January 10, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer and artist Slava Semeniuta, who goes by the name Local Preacher, recently noticed the glimmering reflective beauty of the streets of Sochi after an evening rain. As the artist tells Colossal, he had his camera handy and was able to “show the hidden beauty under our feet.” The series of dramatically-colored photographs isolates neon shop window reflections in puddles and potholes and transforms the captured moments into otherworldly landscapes. Semeniuta is based in Sochi, Russia, and shares his work on Behance and Instagram.

 

 



Art

Paper-Cast Sculptures of Legs and Torsos Covered in Traditional Chinese Paintings by Peng Wei

January 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Beijing-based artist Peng Wei places traditional Chinese painting on rice paper to create contemporary sculptures of human legs, shoes, and torsos. These paper-cast works display scenes of the natural and domestic, including lush gardens, animals, and interiors of Chinese homes. Peng has been troubled by the adoption of Western styles of clothing by Chinese women. By painting classical Chinese motifs on Western shoes and other fashion-related items, Peng aims to deny the decline of China’s cultural heritage to rapid globalization.

Peg was born in Chengdu in 1974 and graduated from the Eastern art department of Nankai University with a BA in Literature and an MA in Philosophy. Her works have been collected by the National Art Museum of China, the Hong Kong Museum of Art, the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco, the Guangdong Art Museum, and many more international collections. You can see more of Peng’s paintings and sculptures on Artsy. (via Lustik)

 

 

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