Photography

Section



Photography

Salt Extraction Sites Turn Landscapes into Vivid Tapestries in Tom Hegen’s Aerial Photos

November 22, 2022

Grace Ebert

An aerial photo of vibrant fields of salt

All images © Tom Hegen, shared with permission

Since 2018, German photographer Tom Hegen (previously) has been soaring above regions from western Australia and Senegal to France and Spain as he documents the vivid landscapes of salt production. His mesmerizing aerial images peer down at evaporation ponds that carve the earth into a patchwork of vibrant hues. “What attracted me was the graphic and abstract appearance of these landscapes, which almost has a painterly quality. This is also the core feature that aerial photography has to offer: an unfamiliar few at ordinary things that surround us,” Hegen shares about the project.

Spanning nearly 300 pages, a forthcoming book titled Salt Works compiles more than 160 images from the series. Although their footprints vary widely, many of the areas spotlighted approach extraction in a similar manner: Harvesters often route seawater into these fields or small pockets of land, and the sun and wind help evaporate the liquid, leaving the crystalline minerals behind. Micro bacteria tint the salt into striking pastures of rose, aqua, and ochre, transforming the areas into rich tapestries of color.

Shop prints and posters from the series on Hegen’s site and pre-order Salt Works. Find more on Instagram and Behance.

 

Two aerial photos of vibrant fields of salt

An aerial photo of vibrant fields of salt

An aerial photo of vibrant fields of salt

An aerial photo of vibrant fields of salt

An aerial photo of vibrant fields of salt

An aerial photo of vibrant fields of salt

 

 

advertisement



Art Photography

Quirky Clothesline Creatures Saunter Across Helga Stentzel’s Landscape Illusions

November 16, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of laundry hanging on a line like a dinosaur in a landscape

“Laundrosaurus.” All images © Helga Stentzel, shared with permission

A wooly sweater returns to its material roots in the latest creatures to spring from Helga Stentzel’s clothesline menagerie. The London-based artist captivated audiences last year with her whimsically strung farm animals that appeared to put old shirts and jackets out to pasture. Now, Stentzel’s collection of characters includes a dinosaur of bleached white undergarments, a sweatpants camel, and the aforementioned sweater sheep. Positioned against expansive views of deserts and mountainous areas, the stylish illusions take a playful approach to laundry day.

Alongside these creatures, Stentzel has been creating 3D works, some of which are on view from November 18, 2022, to March 1, 2023, at CXC Art Museum in Seoul. Pick up a print in her shop, and follow her on Instagram to keep an eye on the additions to what the artist terms “household surrealism.”

 

A photo of laundry hanging on a line like a zebra in a landscape

“Zelda” (2022)

A photo of laundry hanging on a line like a cat on a roof

“Inky”

A photo of laundry hanging on a line like sheep in a landscape

“Baa-baa-ra” (2022)

A photo of laundry hanging on a line like a camel in a landscape

“Camella” (2022)

 

 



Photography

Tiers of Dyed Water Burst into Perfectly Concentric Circles in Jack Long’s Energetic Photos

November 12, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

All images © Jack Long, shared with permission

For at least a decade, Jack Long has paired his day job in advertising photography with a growing archive of personal projects that explore the energetic, dynamic qualities of liquid. His latest series centers on circular pools of water that splash outward, creating colorfully tiered layers that build up the dimension of a typically gravity-bound material. Although the liquid appears to be spraying outward after being punctured by an object dropped from above, it is actually gurgling upward from a custom-designed fountain. Long shares with Colossal that the machine took about two years to build and produces pools that reach about 30 inches in diameter, which he has to photograph within a fraction of a second to capture the perfectly concentric effect.

You can find more of Long’s hypnotic works on Behance, Instagram, and his site.

 

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

A photo of colorful tiers of splashing water

 

 



Photography

Moss Drapes from Trees in Ethereal Photographs of England’s Forests by Neil Burnell

November 10, 2022

Kate Mothes

A photograph of moss-covered, gnarled trees in a misty forest.

All images © Neil Burnell, shared with permission

England has long been a haven for rich woodlands of oak, birch, hazel, and pine, chronicled in famous stories like Robin Hood’s Sherwood Forest or the real-life 11th century king William the Conqueror, who established a “Forest Law” that claimed woodlands as hunting grounds for kings. In the 19th and 20th centuries, native forests were increasingly transformed into pasture for grazing livestock, replaced with modern developments, or re-planted with commercial timber. The remarkable atmosphere of Dartmoor’s forests are captured by Devon-based photographer Neil Burnell (previously), who focuses on the mystical, otherworldly environments through all four seasons.

Burnell was inspired as a child by a visit to Wistman’s Wood, a remote, upland area of old, gnarled oak. “Little was I to know the lasting impression this would leave me with as a young lad, as I find myself re-imagining how I felt, and how I could spread this awe and wonder through my passion for photography,” he explains. Although Dartmoor National Park currently advises that visitors avoid walking through Wistman’s Wood to allow it to heal from damage caused during lockdowns, Burnell’s images offer a glimpse of moss-coated limbs and fern-covered forest floors that seem to freeze time. He also visits dense stands of conifers, with canopies that create dreamlike effects as they block the sunlight from reaching the ground below.

Burnell often teaches workshops around South West England that focus on nature and landscape photography, which you can learn more about on his website. You can also find more of his work on Behance.

 

A photograph of trees in a misty forest.

A photograph of moss-covered, gnarled trees in a misty forest.

A photograph of moss-covered, gnarled trees in a forest.

A photograph of trees in a misty forest.

Two atmospheric photographs of trees in the mist.

A photograph of a beam of light coming down through the forest canopy in a tree plantation, illuminating a gnarled tree.

Yellow ferns and leaves in a misty forest in autumn.

A photograph of moss-covered, gnarled trees in a misty forest.

 

 



Photography Science

Photographer Levon Biss Illuminates the Strange, Otherworldly Chrysalises of Butterfly Pupae

November 4, 2022

Grace Ebert

A photo of 30 butterfly pupae

All images © Levon Biss, shared with permission

A photographer known for using the macro to investigate the micro, Levon Biss (previously) continues his explorations into the vast world of entomology. His recent butterfly pupae series centers on “the diversity of design and form” through illuminating portraits of approximately 30 specimens as they undergo metamorphosis and complete the final, most vulnerable stage of the transition from adolescence to adulthood.

Otherworldly and bordering on the bizarre, many of the chrysalises have evolved to be deceptive in appearance, acting as necessary camouflage from potential predators by impersonating nearby plants and surroundings: some mimic the natural, like those that imitate a rotting plantain or mossy hunk of bark, while others are more artful, like those spotted with Kusama-esque dots or cloaked in a mirrored gold coating. The photographs are “intended to be both entertaining and educational,” Biss shares, “allowing the viewer to appreciate the diversity in the subject whilst appreciating the intricate details that evolution has created.”

Pick up a print of the unearthly images, and find more from the collection on Biss’s site and Instagram. If you’re in New York, you can also see his Extinct and Endangered series at the American Museum of Natural History.

 

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like a plantain

A photo of a butterfly pupa with black dots

Two photos of green butterfly pupae

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like mossy bark

Two photos of butterfly pupae that are brown and green

A photo of a butterfly pupa that looks like mirrored gold

 

 



Photography

The 2022 Landscape Photographer of the Year Contest Captures Stunning Environments Around the U.K.

October 31, 2022

Grace Ebert

“The Sacred Garden,” Gray Eaton. All images @ the artists, courtesy of the Landscape Photographer of the Year, shared with permission

From hazy lochs and grand mountainous vistas to water-side pedestrian paths, the 2022 Landscape Photographer of the Year contest highlights the vast splendor of Britain’s environments. Winners of this year’s competition encompass both the natural and human-made, showcasing a steam-engulfed train roaring across the Fellowman Crosses Ribblehead viaduct or a glimmering celestial sky above the limestone arch of Durdle Door.

The contest joins Network Rail for a traveling exhibition that will migrate across the U.K., starting with Paddington Station on October 31. Peruse the winning images on the competition’s site and by picking up a copy of this year’s book.

 

“The Fellsman Crosses Ribblehead Viaduct,” Matthew James Turner

“Durdle Door Night Lights,” Callum White

“Brecon in Winter,” Will Davies, overall winner

“Rough and Tumble,” Lloyd Lane

“Dirgelwch Penmon / Myster,” Llion Griffiths

“Regency Wharf,” Damien Walmsley

“Wild Elgol,” Fiona Campbell

“Ascension,” Demi Oral

“Gannets Overhead,” Thomas Easterbrook