Photography

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Photography

Shuttered Windows and Placid Canals Show Venice’s Sleepier Side in Night Photographs by Thibaud Poirier

May 31, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Scenes of contemporary Venice often inevitably include throngs of tourists amongst the centuries-old architecture. But French photographer Thibaud Poirier (previously) took his camera out during the city’s quieter hours. During a weekend trip this past winter, Poirier sought to capture the timelessness of Venice, a task easier done there than in other cities like Paris, Poirier tells Colossal, because of Venice’s lack of cars. Vehicles on city streets tend to simultaneously distract from, and date, photographs of buildings.

In his series Sleeping Venice, the still waters of the canals reflect illuminated docks and the warm-toned weathered facades of the city’s brick and stucco buildings. Poirier explains that he used Google Maps to locate bridge and canal intersections, and then explored the pinpointed areas on foot. Despite the aquatic elements in his image, the photographer shares that he actually took all the shots on land, from bridges, ledges, and dead-end streets. You can see more of Poirier’s work and travels on Instagram and Behance, and find information on purchasing fine art prints on his website.

 

 

 



Food Photography

Elegant Still Lifes of Luscious Fruits and Perfectly Ripe Vegetables Trapped Inside Plastic Packaging

May 28, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Spanish studio QUATRE CAPS usually focuses on architectural renderings, but for a recent series, titled Not Longer Life, the group turned their attention to the plastic in our food system. In each of the six images, classic still life paintings by artists including Claude Monet, Michelangelo Merisi da Caravaggio, and Juan Sánchez Cotán are given a contemporary update. Recognizable still life elements like strongly directed light and decorative fabrics are maintained. But the perishable fruit that traditionally symbolized the temporary nature of life is now cloaked in plastic preservatives like cling wrap, clamshell containers, and stretchy foam sleeves.

The studio explains to Colossal, “Thousands of products are being commercialized, doubling and tripling a synthetic skin or even worse, taking the place of their natural wrapping skin with a plastic package in order to ‘ease’ their consumption.” If you like this series, also check out the work of Suzanne Jongmans. You can explore more projects by  QUATRE CAPS on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

Update: a reader shared an insightful article that highlights the importance of pre-cut produce in increasing accessibility to nutritious food for people with limited dexterity.

 

 



Photography

Bruce the Eagle Gets his 15 Minutes of Fame in a Symmetrical Glamour Shot by Photographer Steve Biro

May 22, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

An eagle named Bruce, resident at the Canadian Raptor Conservancy in Ontario, recently took a dive over open water at the conservancy. Amateur photographer Steve Biro happened to be there at just the right moment, with camera in hand. Bruce’s arced wings reflected in the water below form a an almost perfect oval, and the bird’s bright yellow beak and piercing gaze are directed squarely at the camera. Bald eagles can have a wingspan ranging from six to seven and half feet.

“I snapped a couple images from the side and decided I wanted to get a vantage point where I might be able to shoot him more straight on,” Biro explains to Colossal. “There was a large rock right at the water’s edge were I laid down beside and rested my upper body on trying to get as low as possible.” Biro notes that Bruce was flying close enough to him that he could feel the draft from the bird’s wings, so he was able to a macro lens to capture the moment.  Follow along with Biro’s nature explorations on Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Photography

Tennis Balls and Swim Caps Crowd the Frame in New Time-Lapse Compositions by Pelle Cass

May 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Pelle Cass (previously) captures how humans interact with a location or an environment over time, presenting a visual history of the coincidences that occur. Over the last year and a half the Brookline, Massachusetts-based photographer has turned his lens to sports, framing sporting events from fencing to college football in order to create densely packed scenes that combine players from multiple images. During the course of one game or match he might take upwards of 1,000 photographs to provide the content for endless combinations of movements and poses. The final result is a still time-lapse photograph which condenses an hour or so of play into one dynamic image. Cass has a solo exhibition at Camerawork Gallery in Portland, Oregon that runs through May 31, 2019. You can see more of his dynamic series on his website and Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Photography

Jarring Juxtapositions of Prosperity and Conflict by Uğur Gallenkuş

May 17, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Bottom photograph: Paula Bronstein

Turkish artist Uğur Gallenkuş uses split images to emphasize the grave differences between war-torn countries and privileged, peaceful societies. Gallenkuş often specifically references Western visual culture in his juxtaposed images, such as Christian iconography of the Madonna and child, and the Instagram aesthetic of the ice cream cone portrait. In each composite image, the Istanbul-based artist pairs a carefully matched slice of prosperity with jarring documentation of conflict and poverty to show what occupies the attention and defines the experiences of people around the world, depending on where they live.

Gallenkuş has been creating these divided images for several years as a personal project, and has garnered global attention for his work, which he shares with nearly half a million followers on Instagram. In a recent interview with Juxtapoz, the artist explained,  “If we want to live in peace and trust, we must have healthy knowledge and empathy. Wrong and biased information and hatred make these problems even worse.”

Lefthand photograph: Abd Doumany

Lefthand photograph: Mario Tama

Lefthand photograph: Shakib Rahman / Righthand photograph: Frederic J. Brown

Righthand photograph: Yasin Akgul

Lefthand photograph: Khalid Mohammed

 

 

 



Art Photography

Multiverse: Hiroshi Kondo’s Dizzying Documentation of Taiwan’s Busy Streets

May 15, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Tokyo-based filmmaker Hiroshi Kondo captures the endless movement of urban environments in his fast-moving short films. Kondo often homes in on one specific element of city living, like street lights—or, in his new short film, scooter commuters. Multiverse follows riders as they move in swarms, their density highlighted through time-lapse. At certain moments, Kondo focuses on an individual rider, which emphasizes unique journeys within the teaming repetition. Multiverse’s music and sound design is by Himuro Yoshiteru. You can watch more of Kondo’s dizzying films on Vimeo. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Food Photography

A Literal Translation Lends a Daring Edge to the First Meal of the Day

May 8, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Although breakfast is commonly consumed in a rush out the door, or slurped hurriedly before one dashes to catch the bus, the early morning meal’s straightforward composition of actions is often not considered. Madrid-based photographer Tessa Dóniga created the series Break/Fast after becoming intrigued by the deconstructed word’s literal translation to Spanish. Smashed cereal, a sliced bean can, and a quickly melting stick of butter all serve as subjects of the surreal photographic series, which highlight the different ways breakfast can be “broken.”

The project was first realized in collaboration with independent journal Polpettas and serves as a metaphor for how Dóniga views the world as a bilingual speaker. “The fact that I’m bilingual makes me wonder more,” she told gestalten. “When I try to translate some words into one language from another, I question myself. My challenge was to set in one image both terms in a visual composition that would be recognizable to the viewer.”

Like all of Dóniga’s uniquely styled series, Break/Fast was creating from scratch with editing in postproduction for some of her more high-flying effects such as hovering bacon or scattered eggshells. You can see more of her food styling photography on her studio’s website and on Instagram.