Animation

Section



Animation History Photography

Surreal Animated Photos and Artworks by Nicolas Monterrat

November 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Illustrator and animator Nicolas Monterrat (previously) has brought his wild imagination to historical photographs and artworks that he sets in motion and shares on Ello. The short animations blend images borrowed from old catalogues, newspapers, and textbooks with snippets of abstract footage to create collage-like images that range from humorous to downright terrifying. You can follow more from the Paris-based artist on Tumblr. (via Cross Connect)

 

 



Animation

Wiggly Noodle People Appear to Disintegrate in a Bizarre New Animation by Ari Weinkle

November 6, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Boston-based digital artist and designer Ari Weinkle reflects on the physical effects of negative emotions in a new experimental video that shows human forms imploding, melting, morphing, and disappearing. Titled ‘Moodles,’ and set to a backdrop of electronic music, the short video features a series of anonymous solitary figures constructed out of ombre strands. The strands initially follow the body’s contour lines but quickly squiggle into piles, sink holes, or walls.

Weinkle writes about the project:

Moodles is a short animation based on the effects of negative emotions on one’s self. It turns built up tension, stress, and anxiety into creative catharsis. Frozen figures – once paralyzed by moods – are reduced to heaps of flexible nothingness.

You can see more of the artist’s work on Behance and Instagram.

 

 



Animation Design

Build Your Own 3D Zoetrope With This Desktop Animation Kit

November 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Inspired by the pre-film animation devices of the 1800’s, company 4-Mation has created a DIY kit that allows users to produce their very own tabletop animations. Unlike historic zoetropes, the kit is built for 3D objects. Using synchronized strobes and carousel rotation, the machine animates objects placed on its circular base, giving life to ravenous fish or leaping frogs.

The kit is available in three models. You can choose from a laser cut plywood frame, a machined walnut frame (as seen in the included videos), and an electronics version which comes with instructions for how to cut your own. The company will present their invention at the December’s Rome Maker Fair, and plans to launch a Kickstarter the same month. You can sign up on their website to be notified of the exact release.

 

 



Animation Art

An Architectural Study of a Norwegian Cathedral Facade Animated From a Single Photo

November 3, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Animator Ismael Sanz-Pena has brought the sculptural facade of Nidaros Cathedral in Trondheim, Norway to life through a unique continuous motion animation that uses just one photograph. Sanz-Pena’s pairing of the video with a lively, fast-paced Liberian field recording of chants, cheers, and drumming adds an extra element of vitality. The artist described his process to Colossal:

The idea behind the film was to find the innate movement inherit in still forms. Every sculpture has movement in it, and it is the task of the animator to discover it. It was through the process of editing my imagery that I discovered that a single image would suffice to create the animation. The film was made by zooming into the image and panning row by row while making sure that different architectural motives aligned in every increment. This also gave a structure to the film.

Originally hailing from Spain, Sanz-Pena has studied and worked in the field of animation around the world and is currently an assistant professor of animation at the Kansas City Art Institute.

 

 



Animation

Paper Trail: An Animated Collage by Jake Fried

October 13, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Animator Jake Fried (previously) is known for his hand-drawn ink and white-out films that incorporate dense imagery and symbolism across a rapidly changing field of view, all photographed frame by frame through nearly 1,500 layers. His latest piece, Paper Trail, introduces a collage-like feel through a lovely layering technique. You can see many more of his films on Vimeo.

 

 



Animation Art Illustration

Transport Cats Across an Animated Countryside With Alexander Perrin’s Interactive Illustration ‘Short Trip’

September 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Short Trip is an interactive illustration by Australian artist Alexander Perrin. The meditative simulation places the player in the conductor’s seat of a cross-country train, allowing the user to use their arrow keys to go forwards or backwards through the game’s peaceful black and white countryside while delivering a series of animated cat passengers.

The illustrated simulation took Perrin five years to complete, from researching how a graphite-based drawing could be presented on a digital platform, to creating all the necessary components of the train’s journey by hand. His interest for this particular scenery came from riding on the Hakone Tozan Railway in Japan, one of his favorite ways of travel.

“It’s a magical, rickety switchback railway that ascends a forest shrouded mountain all throughout the year,” Perrin told Colossal. “There’s something about the beautifully crafted forms of the railway in sculpted union with the cliff faces and trees that just hits such a therapeutic, aesthetic sweet spot. It’s a little bit like riding an enlarged miniature railway, if you know what I mean. You remain passive and enjoy the ride for the sake of the journey.”

The game was built with this passiveness in mind, the only “goal” of the project to get to the other side of the railway while you enjoy the scenery and relaxing soundtrack of gentle bird chirping and cable car as it softly rumbles across the tracks. We recommend make the game full-screen with audio to get the full, tranquil experience of Short Trip.

You can watch a scene from an earlier game prototype by Perrin called Noirmittens in the video below, and see more clips from his current simulator on his website and Instagram.

 

 



Animation Art

A Mesmerizing Experimental Claymation Short by Romane Granger

September 15, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

In this captivating short animated work, Romane Granger, a student at the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, weaves an abstract narrative from clay and sand. The work begins as a flat plane, showcasing a field of flowers in constant death and rebloom. Halfway through the piece, which is synced to Yasuaki Shimizu’s Utsukushiki Tennen, a large mountain erupts to consume the array of flora, throwing the film into three dimensions. The extremely unique piece was an official selection at this year’s Ottawa International Animation Festival and the Festival du film de Savigny. You can look behind-the-scenes at Granger’s animated works on Instagram and Vimeo.