Animation

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Animation Science

Take a Deep Dive Into the Relative Scale of Atoms Through the Tip of a Ballpoint Pen

August 30, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The Super Zoom is a new computer-generated animation that shows how everything in the universe is made of minuscule foundational elements. The 3 minute-long short grounds itself with a relatable starting point: a ballpoint pen and ruled paper. On the lower right side of the screen, a scale adjusts as the “camera” zooms further and further in, breaking through the pen tip’s metal surface into more and more minute layers. The Super Zoom was created by Pedro Machado, a computer graphics designer who is based in Brazil. You can watch more of Machado’s videos on Vimeo.

 

 



Animation Science

A Digital Animation Explores the Height of Trees From a 3-Inch Bonsai to a 300-Foot Sequoia

August 23, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In this calming video by Red Side, a variety of tree species are compared side-by-side. The animation spans different common and more unique tree types, starting with 3-inch Keshitsubo bonsai tree and moving all the way to a towering Sequoia sempervirens. In addition to the subtly billowing trees, the video also contains some human-made landmarks that help to add context, like the Leaning Tower of Pisa, a rocket, and the Statue of Liberty. You can see more of Red Side’s animations, like this animal population video or tornado comparison, on Youtube. (via The Morning News)

 

 



Animation Art

Sparkling Balls of Paint and Glitter Explode and Absorb in a New Experimental Short Film by Rus Khasanov

August 16, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Filmmaker Rus Khasanov (previously) was working on a challenging shoot in Seoul, South Korea when he got the idea for this latest experimental film, Unity. The short work follows hundreds of paint bubbles as they roll, explode, and merge across the screen, creating dazzling bursts in shades of purples, oranges, pinks, and blues set to a soundtrack by Dmitry Evgrafov. Khasanov had been attempting to make two paint balls merge perfectly for his original commercial shoot, which he was finally able to achieve on the last day of shooting by chance and luck.

After several various ingredient experiments, he was able to learn how to get paint balls to absorb without bursting. “When you master the technique,” he explains, “you can already playfully turn the flaws into advantages: now in the bursting paint ball I see not a nightmare, but a bright colorful explosion which reminds me of fireworks.”

The film has elements that are in sharp focus while others imitate the bokeh effect, showcasing the sparkling paint elements in a soft out-of-focus that makes the entire thing seem like the bright spots of a blurred photograph. You can see more of Khasanov’s short films on Vimeo and Instagram.

 

 



Animation

Perspective Goes Out the Window in Dirk Koy’s Space-Warping Experimental Animations

August 14, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Experimental filmmaker and motion graphics artist Dirk Koy (previously) creates dizzying short films that upend viewers’ expectations of focus and perspective. In one, a high diver seems to remain static while the sky-filled frame twists and spins around him; in another, a building appears to be demolished and constructed with the simple drag of a computer cursor. Koy lives and works in Basel, where he graduated from the Academy of Art and Design. In addition to his own projects and commissions, Koy is also a lecturer on time-based media at the Academy. You can explore more of his unusual videos on Instagram and Vimeo.

 

 



Animation

Squirming Multi-Colored Bodies Dance Across the Screen in an Unsettling Animation by Mike Pelletier

August 8, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Flurry” is a bizarre new animated short from the experimental artist Mike Pelletier. The two minute-long video features no obvious narrative. Rather, the animation is an exploration of movement and volume: an indeterminate number of humanoid figures seem to merge and divide as their flaccid limbs wiggle and squirm. Pelletier is Canadian and now based in Amsterdam. In a statement, the artist shares that “his work explores the various ways in which the human body is represented in art and the social milieu”. Watch more of Pelletier’s experiments on Vimeo (especially this deflated fruit animation) on Vimeo. Digital editions of the artist’s work are available in his online store.

 

 



Animation Art

An Amusement Park-Themed Animated Short by Fernando Livschitz Goes Off the Rails

August 7, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The fate of riders on roller coasters and ferris wheels takes an unexpected turn in “Beautiful Chaos”, a new short from Fernando Livschitz of Black Sheep Films (previously). We won’t give too much away, but the minute-long animation uses digital editing to make amusement park rides perform stomach-churning tricks. Let’s just say… don’t try this at home.  Watch more of Livschitz’s animations on Vimeo and Instagram.

 

 

 



Animation Art Design Science

Infinite Forms Unfurl in New Rotating Sculptures by John Edmark

August 6, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

We continue to be transfixed by John Edmark’s (previously) infinite 3-D printed designs. The self-described artist, designer, and inventor uses visual tricks to create cascading effects on rotating textured white sculptural surfaces. His most recent video, “Blooms Assortment”, features a noodle-like form, shifting cubes, and a hollow gridded shape that resembles a geyser or mushroom cloud. Edmark has a bachelor’s and master’s degree in computer science and has lectured at Stanford’s design program for over fifteen years.  See more of Edmark’s creations on Vimeo and if you’d like to call one of his pieces your own, visit his online store.