Animation

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Animation

Billions of Color Changing Particles Create Amorphous Waves in a New Art Film by Maxim Zhestkov 

August 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Volumes is a new 4K experimental art film by artist and director Maxim Zhestkov (previously) which explores the laws of nature through the interactions of billions of spherical particles. As the digitally produced elements collide they transform into a series of brilliant colors, morphing from black and grey orbs to pink, blue, and white balls and back again. The spheres combine to create sweeping waves that disperse and meld back together in large, amorphous forms. You can view more of the director’s projects on Vimeo, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 



Animation Art Photography

Light Painting Animations Create Dazzling Effects Around Glass Spheres

July 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

During his last few months in school, recent University of Maryland graduate Josh Sheldon built a light animation robot scaled to the size of his small college bedroom. For the personal project, Sheldon taught himself Blender, Python, and Dragonframe in just under two weeks. The device allowed him to create dazzling effects around spheres and cubes, with each animation taking between four and twelve hours to shoot. You can view the process behind Sheldon’s robot in the view below, and take a look at the code he used for each of his light paintings over on Github. More of Josh’s work, including these light portraits, can be found on his Instagram. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Animation Illustration

Vanishing Thoughts Explored in High Contrast GIFs by Tracy J Lee

July 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Dust"

“Dust”

Chicago-based art director, designer, and illustrator Tracy J Lee creates animated city scenes drenched in high contrast light and shadow with subjects who are lost in deep inner thought. In several of the GIFs the central character steps outside of their self as a ghostly doppelgänger that disappears almost as quickly as it enters the frame. The figure plays a duet next to its twin, or attempts to help himself up from a position on the floor. The last few GIFs were inspired by the South Korean boy band BTS, and feature interpretations of some of Lee’s favorite songs. You can see more of her illustrations on her TumblrInstagram, and Behance. (via The Art of Animation)

"Rain"

“Rain”

"Waiting for a friend"

“Waiting for a friend”

"Nameless Bird"

“Nameless Bird”

"Butterfly"

“Butterfly”

"In that Briefest Moment"

“In that Briefest Moment”

"Illusion"

“Illusion”

"Disguise"

“Disguise”

"Song for the Lost"

“Song for the Lost”

"You long for the past, the future, but why is it never the present?"

“You long for the past, the future, but why is it never the present?”

 

 



Animation

3D Editing Tools Manipulate Everyday Life in This Reality-Bending Video by Vladimir Tomin

July 26, 2018

Sasha Bogojev

Russian motion designer Vladimir Tomin recently went viral with his most recent, mind-blowing video reel titled Прогулка (Stroll). As the title suggests, the footage is a first-person view of a casual stroll, filled with a collection of reality-bending events. Tomin places the interface of his work tools in the real world, gaining virtual superpowers that allow him to bend street lamps, cause a wave of painted street markings, digitally move a slinky down a set of stairs, move or knock things over, and more.

“When you have an idea, you can’t wait to see how it is going to work, and if it is going to work,” he tells Colossal. “So you work towards it, and during the process there is stuff that you have to figure out, stuff that works easier than you planned, and stuff that is much harder than you anticipated. It’s a very fulfilling process that is fueled by curiosity.”

The inspiration for his animations comes from different sources, but in this case, he was particularly intrigued with the power of Instagram’s realtime AI filters. With everyday gadgets being so technically advanced and providing such possibilities to end users, his reel was made with the vision of what future technologies might allow. By borrowing elements from the generic motion graphic program interface, the video constructs an illusion of utilizing 3D workstation tools in real time, just as commonly as one might use Instagram filters.

The concept was realized using his actual video footage as the background, with all objects that are being manipulated being animated in full 3D, mostly using Adobe After Effects and Cinema 4D. “Sometimes the idea is above everything else, and even if you currently have no clue how to make it work – you will find a way,” he explains. “That sometimes is challenging and it feels great to finally win that fight. Probably not unlike beating some nasty level in a very hard game. Hard but satisfying.”

Tomin has actively worked for over a decade as a graphic illustrator and motion designer, and has an impressive list of awards and projects under his belt. His list of clients includes Bloomberg, Boeing, Coca-Cola, Google and Intel. Vladimir is also a big Nintendo fan, and really enjoys the current trends and novelties of that world. You can see more of his graphics and video-based work, including this animated Nintendo Switch, on Instagram. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Animation Art

New Whimsical Cardboard Machines and an Art Deco-Inspired Stop Motion Film by Daniel Agdag

July 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"The Installation" (2017), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The Installation” (2017), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

Australian artist Daniel Agdag (previously) produces invented contraptions and antiquated flying machines from cardboard, timber, and trace paper, turning his whimsical fantasies into highly detailed sculptures. The works seek to connect his audience with the mechanics located beneath the exterior of modern machines, while emphasizing the complexity present in our everyday experiences.

New sculptural works include a flying caboose the combines the visual language of locomotives and hot air balloons, and a turbine-assisted car that moves horizontally along a raised track. In addition to these new pieces, Agdag has also released a short film with producer Liz Kearney titled Lost Property Office. The stop motion animation follows a custodian named Ed through his solitary work in a large city’s Lost Property Office, exploring the whimsical creations he builds from discarded objects and machines. Over 2,500 sheets of recycled cardboard were utilized over the course of film’s 18-month production, which translated into 1,258 hand-crafted and Art Deco-style set pieces and props.

Agdag and Kearney’s film is currently being screened at film festivals all over the world. Next month Lost Property Office will travel to the New Zealand International Film Festival for Animation Now! on August 2 and 6, 2018 and the Palm Springs International Animation Festival from August 22-26, 2018. You can watch the trailer for the short in the video below, and see more of Agdag’s sculptural objects on his website and Instagram.

Still from Lost Property Office

Still from Lost Property Office

Still from Lost Property Office

Still from Lost Property Office

"The Compartment" (2018), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The Compartment” (2018), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The General and the Caboose” (2017), cardboard, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The General and the Caboose” (2017), cardboard, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

"The General and the Caboose" detail

“The General and the Caboose” detail

"The Chapel" (2017), cardboard, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The Chapel” (2017), cardboard, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

"The Chapel" detail

“The Chapel” detail

"The Caboose" (2018), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The Caboose” (2018), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The Caboose” detail

"The Northwesterly" (2017), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

“The Northwesterly” (2017), cardboard, trace paper, mounted on timber base with hand-blown glass dome, 23 x 12 x 12 inches

 

 



Animation Design Illustration

Take a Virtual Vacation on Vera van Wolferen’s Animated ‘Thought Hopper 3000’

July 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The Thought Hopper 3000 is a new project from the mind of Dutch paper craftsman and stop-motion animator Vera van Wolferen (previously). The interactive website presents the viewer with a five-minute vacation programmed inside of a quaint mobile camper made entirely from paper. Players are encouraged to click around for “hot spots” hidden throughout the site which spring to life when selected.

The game is currently in its first demo version and is condensed to around five minutes of play. Van Wolferen hopes to expand the Thought Hopper 3000 universe to include several other animated components and add more rooms for the user to explore. The short game’s scenes are animated by Raymon Wittenberg, the sounds were produced by Flavia Faas, and interaction design, graphics, and programming were done by Floris Douma.

You can learn about new additions to the project by visiting its website, and follow van Wolferen’s paper and balsa wood-based sculptures on Facebook and Instagram. If you like this interactive game you might also enjoy playing Short Trip, another animated paper world designed by Alexander Perrin.

 

 



Animation

New Black and White Laser-Cut Animations by Matthias Brown Imitate 19th-Century Optical Illusions

June 26, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Graphic designer Matthias Brown (previously here and here) creates hand drawn animations and cut paper GIFs which he posts to his Tumblr, Traceloops. Previously he’s experimented with rotoscoping techniques for his looping works, which requires each element of the animation to be scanned or traced, frame-by-frame. His subject matter is typically figural, working with dancing bodies, disembodied hands, or melting faces.

Recently, Brown has revisited paper-based animation with a centuries old method called a phenakistoscope. His handmade sculptures are laser-cut from one piece of paper, and imitate the mid-19th-century device by animating as they spin. Brown’s animation above was created from one of these devices, with a full version of the work on Vimeo. You can view a larger range of his recent GIFs on Traceloops.

   

 

 

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