Animation

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Animation Science

Watch a Variety of Common Pills Explode and Dissolve in Ben Ouaniche’s Macro Time-Lapse Video

July 31, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Have you ever wondered what a pill looks like as it dissolves in your stomach? Although this video by filmmaker Ben Ouaniche for Macro Room doesn’t create the exact same conditions as your gut, the time-lapse video does show the spectacular ways pills quickly disintegrate in water as they bubble, ooze, expand, and disappear. If this video sparked an interest in learning how other substances dissolve in water, can see a larger variety of Ouaniche’s macro video experiments (such as acrylic paint, ink, and ice cream) on Vimeo.

 

 



Animation

A New Stop Motion Animation Chronicles a Captain’s Final Journey to the Moon

July 30, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

The Moon’s Milk is a fantastical stop motion tale by animator Ri Crawford that follows Captain Millipede on his final trip to extract milk from the moon as it begins to separate itself from the Earth. During the journey, relationships between the expedition members complicate, while enchanting connections happen in the liminal space between the sea and moon. The film presents two unique views—the one from the Earth, and the flipped perspective seen from the moon. The score for the film was created by Caroline Penwarden, the sound design by Richard Beggs, and singer Tom Waits served as the story’s narrator. You can take a look behind-the-scenes of film in the video below, and see more of his animations on Vimeo. (via Laughing Squid)

Update: The Moon’s Milk narrative is originally told in “The Distance to the Moon,” a short story written in 1968 by the iconic Cuban-Italian author Italo Calvino. You can listen to actor Liev Schreiber read the story in its entirety on Radiolab.

 

 



Animation

Negative Space: The Vast Emotional Landscape of a Father-Son Relationship Packed into an Animated Short

July 16, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

We’ve written previously about “Negative Space”, and the highly-anticipated stop motion animation short is now available in its entirety on Vimeo. Co-directors Max Porter and Ru Kuwahata explore a character’s relationship with his father over his life, from fanciful childhood memories to the somber realities of aging and adulthood. “Negative Space” is adapted from a poem of the same name by Ron Koertge, which centers on the rituals of packing one’s possessions, passed from father to son.

You can step behind the scenes in a making-of video to see how the heartstring-tugging, Oscar-nominated film was created. Porter and Kuwahata share more of their animated films, including personal and commercial projects, on Vimeo.

 

 



Animation Music

Kids Across North America Colored Over 3,000 Frames to Illustrate an Animated Music Video

July 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

An animated music video for Meg Myers’ cover of a Kate Bush song brings kid’s coloring books to life. Director Jo Roy first filmed Myers on a green screen, performing the crawling, climbing, and flying shown in the music video (see behind-the-scenes below). Then, each of the 3,202 frames was printed off as a black and white coloring book page. Elementary school-aged children from ten schools and an art program in the U.S. and Canada colored the pages however they wanted, with a provided crayon color palette.

Over 2,100 kids contributed to the resulting animation, which features Myers exploring the universe as a metamorphosing moth. Within the provided black contour lines, scribbled-in tulips and imaginatively shaded planets form the backdrop for the singer’s winged journey. You can see more of Roy’s directorial and dance work on her website, and listen to Meg Myers on Soundcloud. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Animation Illustration

Eyes Roll and Tongues Unfurl in Quirky Hand-Animated Illustrations by Ed Merlin Murray

July 5, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

 

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Using simple materials like paper and ink washes, artist Ed Merlin Murray creates lively illustrations that animate with the pull of a tab. The expressiveness of the human face is Murray’s frequent subject, with blinking eyes and slithering tongues coming to life in bright colors. In addition to these hand-activated animations, the Scotland-based artist pursues a wide variety of illustration and animation projects. This spring, Murray crowdfunded a “book of drawings based on the eternal mystery of human consciousness, via a set of arcane sciences, esotericism, and the mystical” on Kickstarter, and also offers designs on Society6. You can see more of Murray’s moving images, paired with quirky captions, on Instagram.

 

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Animation

LUFTRAUM: A Disorienting Aerial Collage of Urban Infrastructure by Dirk Koy

June 28, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In his recent short film LUFTRAUM, Basel-based artist Dirk Koy utilized a drone to capture buildings and busy roundabouts from above. These roads and structures were then isolated and stacked to create a perpetually spiraling collage of disorienting urban infrastructure. Koy founded the office Dirk Koy Bild und Bewegung which focuses on experimental films and motion graphics, and over the last few years he has created music videos for Boris Blank and Five Years Older. You can see more of his video mash-ups and edits, such as his playground-based short Time Machine, on Vimeo and Instagram.

 

 



Animation Dance Music

The Line Between Reality and Animation Blurs in a Motion Capture Music Video for Ed Sheeran

June 26, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Pop singer Ed Sheeran flaunts his star power in an incredibly complex music video that combines motion capture, computer generated extras, and a guest appearance by Chance the Rapper to boot. The colorful video for “Cross Me” starts off with a professional dancer, Courtney Scarr, in a motion capture suit. Scarr becomes the sole real-life character in the video revisited throughout the song. Teeming animations of human figures, light effects, and a shower of sprinkles fill a dance hall, outdoor track, baseball field, and video game. Sheeran and Chance both appear as animated versions of themselves, navigating these computer-generated worlds and thoroughly blurring the line between real and imagined.

“Cross Me” was directed by Ryan Staake (previously), and also brings to mind this music video for The Chemical Brothers, directed by DOM&NIC. You can view the comprehensive list of collaborators on the project on the official video’s Vimeo page.

 

 

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