Design

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Art Design

Quirky Cartoon Toys and Vases Carved from Wood by Yen Jui-Lin

November 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Taiwanese artist Yen Jui-Lin carves delightful cartoon-like figures from wood that are almost guaranteed to bring a smile to your face. Some of the pieces function as flower vases or key hooks, while many of the objects are one-off toys that he gives to his children as gifts. You can see many more on Jui-Lin’s Facebook page. (via Lustik)

 

 



Design

LEGOs Snap Into Place in Hintlab’s Line of Playful Rings and Earrings

November 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Paris-based design duo Hintlab amplifies the nostalgia tied to Lego bricks by bringing the classic children’s toy to an older audience. Their line of earrings and rings are made to house small, interchangeable bricks, allowing their customers to customize their look depending on their mood or whim. Each piece of 3D-printed jewelry comes with a set of ten objects that can be either worn as a singular setting or stacked to create a multi-layer work.

Hintlab has also developed a line of jewelry that fits flush in its setting. The color and shape of the flat bricks still reflect the feeling of Lego, but are housed in a more minimal package. You can buy your own interchangeable set on the group’s Etsy, and see past designs on their Instagram. (via Designboom)

 

 



Craft Design

Laminated Jewelry Crafted from Vintage Books by Jeremy May

November 14, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

New work from literary jeweler Jeremy May (previously) transforms the dense layers of books into jewelry that carries the words within each individual, wearable form. Littlefly, his line of rings, necklaces, bracelets, and earrings, reinstalls the finished jewelry in the book that it was originally extracted from, but each piece also has a life of its own with abstract patterns and sculptural shapes.

 

 



Art Design Photography

The Secret Life of the Pencil: An Abstract Portrait Series of Today’s Creatives as Seen Through Their Pencils

November 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Celia Birtwell

Photographer Mike Tinney and industrial designer Alex Hammond were discussing the current state of technology and creativity when they had an observation: with enormous advances in technology, client demands for speed and quick turnaround often venture into the unreasonable leaving precious little time for thinking, sketching, or ideation. Despite advancements in software, the duo found that pencils remained central to their own process of formulating ideas and began to wonder if this held through across creative industries.

“The pencil and its ability to bridge the gap between hand and paper so effectively makes it exceptionally powerful, and as we’ve found, still much loved amongst the creative heroes of our generation,” shares Hammond. As they reached out to other established artists, designers, and photographers they began to request writing utensils to photograph using a special setup. “For each pencil we art directed the shoot to have a very subtle ‘nod’ to them or their work. When that wasn’t suitable, we let the pencil they had chosen to represent them talk for itself, documenting them in their purest form.”

Tinney and Hammond gathered the pencil portraits together in the new book The Secret Life of the Pencil available worldwide through Laurence King.

William Boyd

Dave Eggers

Tracey Emin

Thomas Heatherwick

Henry Holland

Anish Kapoor

Nick Park

Gerald Scarfe

David Shrigley

 

 



Animation Design

Build Your Own 3D Zoetrope With This Desktop Animation Kit

November 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Inspired by the pre-film animation devices of the 1800’s, company 4-Mation has created a DIY kit that allows users to produce their very own tabletop animations. Unlike historic zoetropes, the kit is built for 3D objects. Using synchronized strobes and carousel rotation, the machine animates objects placed on its circular base, giving life to ravenous fish or leaping frogs.

The kit is available in three models. You can choose from a laser cut plywood frame, a machined walnut frame (as seen in the included videos), and an electronics version which comes with instructions for how to cut your own. The company will present their invention at the December’s Rome Maker Fair, and plans to launch a Kickstarter the same month. You can sign up on their website to be notified of the exact release.

 

 



Design

LA Architects and Designers Build Imaginative Outdoor Cat Dwellings for Charity

November 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Architects for Animals celebrated its 10th edition last month, inviting local architects and designers to build functional cat dwellings in response to the city’s homeless cat population. The homes were auctioned off to benefit LA-based non-profit FixNation, a charity organization that provides free spay/neuter services to stray, abandoned, and feral cats. Designs ranged from a modern kitty disco to a roller-coaster like structure, each placing a creative twist on feline shelters with a variety of different cat-safe materials.

More designs from previous Architects for Animals can be found on their website. (via Design Milk)

 

 



Design

Computer-Generated Jigsaw Puzzles Based on Geological Forms

October 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Massachusetts-based design studio Nervous System writes unique computer programs that aim to imitate processes found in nature. These systems produce housewares and jewelry based on organic forms, creating pieces such as algae-inspired necklaces and 3D printed leaf-shaped lamps.  The company recently designed a geode jigsaw puzzle modeled after slices of agate, a type of rock characterized by its repeated colorful bands.

Every geode puzzle designed by Nervous System is completely different. The studio’s computer simulation ensures that natural variations influence the puzzle’s shape, color, and pattern, essentially “growing” the artificial geode in a similar way to how it would be formed in nature. Puzzles are each cut from birch plywood and sold at 180 or 370 pieces. You can view and purchase dozens of other original agate designs in the studio’s online shop. (via My Modern Met)