Design

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Design

Solstice: A Wooden Kinetic Clock Expands and Contracts with the Passing Hours

November 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Solstice is a shape-shifting wooden clock designed by Matt Gilbert of the London-based studio Animaro. The new interior design object presents different configurations throughout the day, expanding to its widest form at noon when the sun is at its highest point, and contracting at 6 PM when the sun is near its lowest. This meditative movement was inspired by nature, specifically how a flower expands its petals to absorb more sunlight. The clock also is a return to our time-based roots, as its design has users rely on its shape and pattern much like we would a sundial.

The clock has two settings, one that completes a rotation every 60 seconds, and one that completes a rotation during a 12-hours cycle. To switch between the two modes, the user taps on a sensor located on the bottom of the clock. The Solstice clock is currently available for pre-order on Kickstarter. The crowdfunding campaign runs through December 13, 2018. You can see more of Animaro’s previous designs on their website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design Food

Cartoonish Bread Faces and Other Wheaty Characters by Sabine Timm

November 8, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Have your kids been complaining about what’s in their lunchbox lately? They must be following Sabine Timm on Instagram. The self-described “artist, creator, beach-trash collector, flea-market lover and photographer” shares a wide variety of work inspired by everyday and found objects. One series in particular is a clever cast of characters formed from sandwich bread.

Timm uses sliced white and whole wheat bread, along with rye crisps, pumpernickle, and baguettes to form the base of endearing, ephemeral faces. Some slices take the shape of humanoid characters, with chives for hair and raspberries for noses, while others, like her canine quartet, feature shiny black olive eyeballs and noses. You can see more from Timm’s eclectic output on Flickr. (via Swiss Miss)

 

 



Design Photography

Recycled Packing Materials Sculpted Into Elaborate Renaissance Costumes by Suzanne Jongmans

November 7, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Interdisciplinary artist Suzanne Jongmans uses her skills as a sculptor and costume designer to create recycled garments from packing materials such as Styrofoam, plastic sheets, and segments of thick bubble wrap. The costumes take the form of elaborate bonnets and high collared dresses which are then photographed on subjects in poses reminiscent of portrait styles from the 15th, 16th, and 17th centuries. Specifically the Dutch artist references paintings created by artists such as Rembrandt, Holbein the Younger, and Rogier van der Weyden in her styled photographs.

Jongmans draws connections between contemporary disposable materials and the aesthetics of fine silks or lace, presenting creative takes on centuries-old clothing. “The idea of making something out of nothing changes our look on reality,” she explains. “…Most people throw that [foam] away. I make clothing out of it; foam is my textile.” You can see more of her portraits and garments sculpted from recycled materials on her website and Facebook.

 

 



Art Design

A Kinetic Sculpture Built from over 600 Parts Gracefully Imitates a Swimming Sea Turtle

November 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Carapace is a kinetic sculpture designed by Derek Hugger (previously) that mimics the motion of a sea turtle gliding through the ocean. The wooden work is composed of over six hundred parts which allow the creature to elegantly tilt its fins, move its body up and down, and even crane its head as if rising above the water for air. A single crank controls the complex structure of gears and mechanisms which were designed to flow as organically as possible.

A non-trivial amount of time was spent watching and studying videos of turtles swimming,” explains Hugger. “Getting the motions of Carapace to closely resemble the motions of real turtles was a true challenge. Countless hours were spent refining the sculpture’s motion to be as lifelike as possible, even before any mechanisms were developed to drive those motions.”

Hugger has also developed a hummingbird in addition to several abstract wood sculptures. You can see these works in action on his website and Youtube.

 

 



Design

A Comprehensive and Colorful Map of London Outlines the City’s Great Buildings and Icons

November 1, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Designer Rafael Esquer of Alfalfa New York (previously) has added a new city print to his collection, this time focusing on the iconic buildings, neighborhoods, and residents of London. The colorful poster highlights the city’s classic landmarks such as Big Ben, the London Eye and the Buckingham Palace, and includes the many bridges that cross over the River Thames. Esquer’s London poster is available for purchase in his online store. The designer is also participating in Colossal’s upcoming exhibition Chain Reaction: Posters About Bikes at the Chicago Design Museum and in the Colossal Shop starting November 16, 2018.

 

 



Art Craft Design History

Art Historical Masterworks Come Alive at Annual Halloween Parade in Kawasaki, Japan

October 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Recently in Kawasaki, Japan, a sextet of famous paintings marched their way through the city’s annual Halloween parade— Picasso’s “The Weeping Woman,” Vincent van Gogh’s self portrait, Johannes Vermeer’s “Girl with a Pearl Earring,” Leonardo da Vinci’s “Mona Lisa,” Edvard Munch’s “The Scream,” and of course Beast Jesus, the art world’s favorite botched masterpiece. Costume wearers presented themselves as the subjects of the famous paintings from the waist up, with fishnet stockings and heels from the waist down. The group won this year’s Pumpkin Award, taking home the grand prize and 500,000 yen, or around $4,400. You can see other prize winners of this year’s Kawasaki Halloween parade on their website, and view the paintings in action in a video by @_ellie_ below. (via Hyperallergic)

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @_ellie_

Image via @eurotwoner

Image via @eurotwoner

 

 



Design Illustration

Technicolor Tattoos Mix Psychedelic Graphics with Memphis-Inspired Patterns

October 30, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Oregon-based tattoo artist Dave, a.k.a. Winston the Whale, uses a wide spectrum of colors in his trippy tattoos. The works merge a 60s aesthetics with inspirations from Scandinavian folk art to Memphis design. Traditional floral and vine motifs border prismatic mouths and starry-eyed bats, while other pieces focus more on an 80s appeal with graphic grids and squiggly yellow lines. You can see more psychedelic compositions and brightly colored animals on Dave’s Instagram.