Design

Section



Craft Design

Sculptural Candles by Greentree Shape Dyed Beeswax into Organic Designs

April 12, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Greentree

From its Catskills studio, Greentree creates sculptural candles in hues from sage and celadon to terra cotta and lilac. The company, helmed by artist Jennifer Green, hand-pours and finishes collections of feathery partridges, pinecones, clean-cut gemstones, and sets of vintage bottles that are equally design objects as they are functional goods. Each unscented candle is made of pure beeswax, meaning it burns cleanly and emits a naturally sweet smell as melts. In addition to the whimsical creations shown here, Greentree also sells angular pillars, tapers with spiraling edges, and other elegant designs in its shop. (via INHABITAT)

 

 

 



Art Design Food

Thin Strips of Metal and Spaghetti Connect in Architectural Collars and Headdresses

April 7, 2022

Grace Ebert

“Fabienne.” All images © Alice Pegna, by Jacques Peg, shared with permission

Paris-based designer and artist Alice Pegna revolves her practice around structures. She’s concerned with both the relationship between individual components and how a larger framework responds to its environment, and her pieces tend to amplify the connection between adornment and the human body. “The structure is an integral part of the universe,” she tells Colossal. “It is not always visible, yet always present, material or immaterial, just like our body, our thoughts, and our life.”

This interest culminates in her architectural body of work that’s comprised of sculptural garments, headdresses, and accessories with sharp points and acute angles. Previously working primarily with uncooked spaghetti, Pegna’s new collection incorporates thin strips of metal that similarly hug the wearer’s form with geometric detail. The pieces were created in collaboration with the Phoenix Alternative Model association for Paris Fashion Week 2021 and worn by models with physical disabilities to highlight their figures. All of the works, which are photographed against stark black backdrops on minimal mannequins, rely on negative space to alter how the body is viewed without obscuring it entirely.

For more of Pegna’s intricate constructions, visit her site and Instagram.

 

“Anna”

“Barbe”

“Crete”

“Clemence”

“Crete”

“Parure”

 

 



Design

Piece Together Nature's Tiny Wonders with Miniature Jigsaw Puzzles from Nervous System

April 6, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Nervous System, shared with permission

The innovative team over at the Catskills-based studio Nervous System (previously) released a new line of miniature jigsaws that match organic shapes with similarly natural subject matter. All spanning less than eight inches, a spotted mushroom, mottled moth, fern, succulent, and blooming begonia comprise the collection that’s a small but challenging display of the planet’s tiny wonders. Each puzzle is encased in a plywood frame and has approximately 40-45 pieces with one whimsy cut in the shape of the larger form. Nervous System plans to add to the series in the coming months, and you can shop the puzzles shown here on its site.

 

 

 



Art Design

1,400 Pages of Rembrandt's Hand Drawings Fill a Wearable Book Bracelet

April 5, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images © Lyske Gais and Lia Duinker, shared with permission

Lined with gilt edges and secured with a gold clasp, a bracelet by the Amsterdam-based duo of Lyske Gais and Lia Duinker packs a vast art historical collection within the span of a wrist. The pair created a wearable catalog back in 2015 that binds 1,400 pages into a thick book. Its contents contain black-and-white hand illustrations from 303 of Rembrandt’s etchings and drawings, subject matter inspired by its availability in Rijksmuseum’s digital archive. “We liked that it would be something you could wear, have your own collection with you,” they tell Colossal.

Titled “Rembrandt’s Hands and a Lion’s Paw,” the book bracelet uses brocheersteek, a method of traditional cross-stitching, and each page is titled and numbered. An additional index helps navigate the hundreds of illustrations held within the leather covers.

Cooper Hewitt acquired the original work, which also won the Rijksmuseum’s 2015 Rijksstudio Award, and Gais and Duinker followed the design with a necklace in a similar style that features Rembrandt’s dogs. There are a few of the original 10 limited-edition bracelets available on the pair’s site. (via Women’s Art)

 

Photo by Frieda Mellema

Photo by Frieda Mellema

 

 



Design

42,000 Bamboo Shoots Construct an Illuminated, Latticed Welcome Center in Vietnam

March 29, 2022

Grace Ebert

All images by Hiroyuki Oki, courtesy of Vo Trong Nghia Architects

A glowing welcome center of interlaced bamboo stands at the entrance of the resort Grand World Phu Quoc in Vietnam. One of many designs by Vo Trong Nghia Architects that utilizes the ubiquitous material, the facility is comprised of arches, domes, and angular grids built from 42,000 culms, or hollow shoots. The open facade and embedded skylights allow light to stream through the building, helping to illuminate a 1,460-square-meter footprint, with visitors entering through an interior shaped like a lotus and bronze drum. “The light comes in beautifully and, along with the natural colour of bamboo, creates a warm and intimate atmosphere, even though the structure is very open in terms of airflow,” the studio shared with dezeen.

For more of Vo Trong Nghia’s architectural projects, visit the studio’s site and Instagram.

 

 

 



Art Design

'Real Time' Uses Amusing Manual Techniques To Track the Passage of Each Minute

March 18, 2022

Grace Ebert

Part of a series of performances centered on cumbersome and surreal timekeeping devices, Maarten Baas’s “Sweeper’s Clock” chronicles two men as they track each passing moment with heaps of garbage. The aerially shot film follows the pair as they push lines of trash representative of the minute and hour hands around a large circle faintly defined in the landscape, keeping time as they go.

Released in 2009, the video piece parallels other clever works in Baas’s Real Time series, including a painter manually unveiling a digital display and another showing the Dutch artist trapped inside a grandfather clock. Visitors to the international terminal of the Amsterdam airport in 2016 were also greeted with “Schiphol Clock,” an analog device suspended from the ceiling in which a man adjusted the time by hand. “The worker’s blue overalls, yellow rag, and red bucket pay homage to the famous Dutch artist, Mondrian,” Baas writes.

Watch more of the artist’s works at the intersection of art, film, and design on Vimeo. (via Laughing Squid)