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Design

A New 1,087-Piece LEGO Set Celebrates NASA’s 50th Anniversary of the Moon Landing

June 4, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Next month marks the 50th anniversary of NASA’s 1969 mission, which landed astronauts Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin on the Moon. To celebrate the semicentennial event, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration has teamed up with LEGO to release a 1,087-piece replica of the Apollo 11 Lunar Module. The model is equipped with both descent and ascent features and comes with with a base plate that mimics the surface of the Moon— including embedded square holes that match the astronaut figures’ foot prints. LEGO launched the sale of the model earlier this month. You can find this LEGO set and other NASA-inspired space modules on their website. (via designboom)

 

 

 



Art Design

Wearable Macramé Sculptures by Sandra de Groot Serve as Soft Headpieces and Armor

June 3, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist Sandra de Groot of Atelier CHAOS creates soft sculptures that are displayed on the human body in the form of elaborate headpieces and ornate armor-like tops. The white macramé works are part of her collection titled kNOTs, which combine elements of craft, sculpture, and architecture in wearable works of art. Each of the ropes that composes her textile forms are made of high quality cotton that allows the pieces to maintain their inherent structure and shape. In a statement, de Groot shares, “the sculptures evolve according to an inner logic that is all mine. Only when the sculpture attains a textile form of attraction and becomes self-contained, I literally let go of the ropes.”

The artist studied at Minerva Art Academy and currently mentors intern artists and designers at her studio. You can see more of de Groot’s hand-knotted works, as well as her photography, on her website and Instagram. (via The Fiber Studio)

 

 



Art Design

Cloud-Like Clusters Form THEVERYMANY’s Pillars of Dreams

May 30, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Photographs by NAARO, courtesy of THEVERYMANY

A new cloud-like collection of bulbous towers stands on a building campus in North Carolina. The sculptural creation, titled Pillars of Dreams, is by Marc Fornes and his New York-based studio THEVERYMANY (previously). Located outside county buildings in Charlotte, the public art piece stands 26.5 feet tall and 43 feet wide, and required 54,000 rivets to hold together over 3,500 individual metal sheets. Pillars of Dreams is composed of eight columns that merge at the top in spherical formations, and hues of pink and blue on the interior peek through in perforations that add to the airy quality of the structure. In a statement on the sculpture, the studio describes it as “a soft landing in a field of quiet moments and curious interactions” that is “meant to be moved through rather than appraised as an object.” Explore more of THEVERYMANY’s ethereal structures on Instagram and Vimeo.

 

 



Art Design

A Mural of Swirling Cursors, Dancing Skeletons, and Rainbow Hearts is Set in Motion When Viewed Through a “GIF-iti” App

May 29, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

For the D&AD (Design and Art Direction) festival, recently held in London, Shutterstock commissioned muralist and pattern designer INSA (previously) to create an interactive artwork. When viewed through the graffiti artist’s “GIF-iti” app, the multi-part mural, titled “File Under:Unresolved” springs to life in a looping animation. Multiple working image windows are filled with visual content from Shutterstock’s media library, ranging from cheerful Lisa Frank-esque rainbow hearts to a stock gif of a businessman smashing his laptop. Nestled among the working image windows are three file folders, constantly hovered over by an arrow cursor.

In a statement INSA wrote, “I hope that the work might make creatives consider how they feel about themselves, their work, the endless deadlines and their use of time in life.” This augmented mural is far from INSA’s first: the U.K.-based artist shares his animated artwork on Instagram and Tumblr. (via Fast Company)

 

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Design History Illustration

Cross-Sections of Geological Formations and Views of the Cosmos Bring the World to Life in 19th Century Educational Charts

May 23, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

In 1887 Levi Walter Yaggy published the Geographical Portfolio – Comprising Physical, Political, Geological, and Astronomical Geography with his publishing company, Western Publishing House of Chicago. The popular set of maps and charts (an expanded second edition was released six years later) was intended for teachers to use in classroom settings. The two by three-foot sheets used clever composite images to convey the range of topography and animals around the world, resulting in dense caves and steep mountain peaks that could be straight out of a fantasy novel.

In addition to their imaginative designs and eye-catching color palettes, Yaggy made strides in the teaching aid field by incorporating interactive elements. Each set included a 3-dimensional relief map of the United States and latches revealed hidden diagrams on individual charts. Unfortunately, despite his forward-thinking designs, Yaggy did include the era’s all-too-common racist depictions of non-white populations on some of his cultural maps.

You can explore the full range of Yaggy’s Geographical Portfolio via digital scans on David Rumsey’s map website (where they are available as on-demand prints and as high-resolution downloads), and learn more about the charts on National Geographic. (via this isn’t happiness)

 

 

 

 



Craft Design Music

Classic Compositions Performed on a Miniature Paper Piano by Aliaksei Zholner

May 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Aliaksei Zholner (previously) is known for making fully functioning models from cardboard and paper. His latest piece is a miniature 18-key piano that is tuned to play popular and classical pieces such as Fryderyk Chopin’s Polonez b-moll, Ludwig van Beethoven’s Für Elise, and Scott Joplin’s The Entertainer. The “strings” of the piano are created from paper strips connected to a tension mechanism similar to a guitar and struck by hammers made from paper and cardboard. The black cardboard body is branded with Zholner’s name above the keys in the style of popular piano makers such as Bösendorfer and Bechstein. A more detailed explanation of the construction (in Russian) is available on the Only Paper forum, and you can view more of his paper demonstrations on his Youtube channel.

 

 



Design

A Playful Building Kit Incorporates Real-World Physics Concepts With Springs and Magnets

May 21, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Mola Model is a modular tabletop building kit that includes springs, magnets, and cables to create a realistic experience for hobbyist engineers and aspiring architects. The Brazilian company’s kits help users learn about real-world structural concerns like buckling and sway frame structures by incorporating flexibility that demonstrates the impact of environmental influences. Each kit includes rigid and flexible connections, cables and bars of varying length and flexibility, as well as plates and mats to ground each structure.

The idea for the company came during Márcio Sequeira’s days as an architectural student: he was concerned about how well he was learning the real-world factors that he would need to take into account in his future career. Sequeira spent almost ten years working on developing Mola Model, and has funded all three of its editions on Kickstarter over the last five years. The latest edition has currently secured over 150% of its goal—find the Mola Structural Kit 3 on Kickstarter. (via FastCo)