Design

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Design

Giant Seesaws Transform New York City’s Garment District into Light-Filled Urban Playground

January 7, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Alexandre Ayer/Diversity Pictures LLC, shared with permission

New York City’s Garment District recently received a dose of cold-weather fun with Impluse, an interactive installation of 12 oversize seesaws that glow and emit sound when someone hops on one end. Originally shown at the Place Des Festivals in Montreal in 2016 before traveling to cities like Chicago, Boston, Scottsdale, the installation allows users to produce their own light and sound shows that transform the city’s dreary January streets. The seesaws range from 16 to 24 feet and contain LED lights that vary in intensity and speakers that play random musical sequences.

Designed by Lateral Office and CS Design, Impulse encourages people to come together in a “public space all year round, both summer and winter months, by engaging ideas of urban play,” the creators said in a statement. “Inspired by the iconic cover of the Joy Division album ‘Unknown Pleasures,’ as well as Steve Reich’s serial, minimal music, which plays with repetition, rhythm and syncopation, Impulse project explores how architecture can visualize sound.” You can be part of the communal display by visiting the installation, which is on Broadway until January 31, or if you’re not in the city, by checking out the Garment District on Instagram.

 

 



Animation Art Design

Mobile Architecture Twists and Morphs in Futuristic Cityscapes by AUJIK

December 30, 2019

Grace Ebert

In “Spatial Bodies: Hong Kong & Shenzhen,” the self-described “mysterious nature/tech cult” AUJIK imagines a Hong Kong and Shenzhen with architecture that shifts and moves seemingly on its own just like live organisms. Using AI and AR technologies, artist and AUJIK founder Stefan Larsson created the short film that depicts a futuristic cityscape with contracting and expanding buildings that are far from resembling typical rectangular skyscrapers. AUJIK’s creature-like structures often have an element similar to limbs or tails, in addition to facades with rounded edges that mimic moving bodies. It is a sequel to a previous project that centered Osaka.

The group says the concept for this project is based on open-source software, which theoretically would allow users to shape the architecture based on their needs and in a collaborative, public manner. Spatial Bodies was commissioned by the Shenzhen Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture and premiered in December 2019. The film features music by Japanese electronic artist Daisuke Tanabe. More of AUJIK’s futuristic conceptions can be found on Behance and Vimeo. (via designboom)

 

 



Design

Bite Me: Packaging Insults Chewers as They Grab a Piece of Tooth-Shaped Gum

December 24, 2019

Grace Ebert

“Your breath is horrendous.” Pink and red packaging by Zoe Schneider resembles a mouth and taunts users each time they yank out a tooth-shaped piece of gum. With flavors like Black and Blueberry, Citrus Smash, and Pummelmint, the antagonistic product is aptly titled “Bite Me.” Schneider is a recent graduate of the Rhode Island School of Design. You can follow her humorous designs on Instagram and Behance.

 

 



Design

Zero-Waste Packaging for Liquids is Made Entirely of Soap

December 19, 2019

Grace Ebert

In an effort to reduce plastic use, product designer Jonna Breitenhuber has conceived of Soapbottle, a zero-waste container for liquids. The colored packaging is made of soap that will degrade over time. It leaves no waste, unlike traditional plastic vessels, which often contribute to the truckload of waste that’s dumped into the ocean every minute. Each bottle features a hole near the top for a string to pass through, providing a simple and reusable storage method. When the liquid is gone, the bottles can be grated and used for body wash or detergent. Follow Breitenhuber’s eco-friendly designs on Instagram. You also might like these soap toiletry containers. (via Kottke)

 

 



Design

Amsterdam Storefront Windows Imitate Billowing Transparent Fabric in Renovation by UNStudio

December 17, 2019

Grace Ebert

All images © Evabloem

A soon-to-be fashion shop in Amsterdam has a new facade that mimics flowing textiles. Designed by UNStudio, a Dutch architecture firm, “The Looking Glass” features three glass panels mounted on the building’s brick front. Each low-iron annealed glass piece is attached with silicone to adjacent panels and has stainless steel edges that form a glass box. Eight millimeters of silicone also sit between the steel to account for any shifts or changes in the pieces. The structures were assembled in a factory before being transported for installation to the store, which is located at P.C. Hooftstraat 138 on one of the city’s best-known shopping streets.

Extending away from the building, the boxes eventually will be used to display clothing. “In a fluid gesture, fashion and architecture come together to represent and celebrate the craftsmanship and geometry of high-end, tailored clothing, creating harmony between aesthetics and function,” the firm says of the project.

Follow UNStudio’s upcoming work, which includes a cable car connecting Heihe, China to Blagoveshchensk, Russia, on Instagram. (via designboom)

 

 

 



Design

Shape-Shifting Figure by Frank Force Wins Best Illusion of 2019

December 16, 2019

Grace Ebert

Is it rotating vertically or horizontally? Clockwise or counterclockwise? An optical illusion created by game developer and artist Frank Force features a moving shape that seemingly shifts each way. It’s no surprise that the work won the 2019 contest for the Best Illusion of the Year. Keep up with Force’s generative art on Twitter. (via Kottke)

 

 



Design

50,000-Square-Foot Garden Populates New Workspace, Making It the Densest Urban Forest in Los Angeles

December 12, 2019

Grace Ebert

Designed by Spanish architects SelgasCano, a Los Angeles workspace has popped up in a formerly empty parking lot in Hollywood. The recently opened SecondHome Hollywood boasts a 50,000-square-foot garden of 6,500 trees and plants and 700 tons of soil and vegetation. It is Los Angeles’s densest urban forest and is also home to 112 native species.

The Hollywood location, which is the first in the United States, contains sixty yellow-roofed office pods. It also encompasses the Anne Banning Community House, a ’60s building designed by prominent architect Paul Williams who is known for defining much of Los Angeles’s architectural aesthetic throughout the 20th century. (via Jeroen Apers)