Music

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Animation Music

Corporate Stock Footage Is Edited Into an Absurdly Chaotic Music Video for BRONSON

August 13, 2020

Grace Ebert

Heading into the office mid- or post-pandemic looks a lot different than a few months ago, but hopefully, no one’s workplace resembles the turbulent situation that unfolds at Bronson Inc. in “Keep Moving.” The absurd video opens with typical depictions of corporate life: A woman’s heels clack on the sidewalk, a man looks forward in a (cheesily) determined manner, and employees swipe their badges to enter the building. Soon, though, the mundane scene morphs into complete mayhem. Workers are swept up like a tidal wave before gushing through a television screen. They’re thrown down escalators and battered with a barrage of office equipment and electronics. For every seemingly simple phone swipe or walk down the hallway, havoc ensues.

Directed by the Swedish collective StyleWar in collaboration with production company Smuggler, the music video accompanies BRONSON ’s newly released track “Keep Moving.” The short is comprised of stock footage that’s manipulated and layered with CGI  to create the frenzied office nightmare, according to a statement. For more of Smuggler’s comical projects, head to Vimeo.

 

 

 



Design Music

A Drawing Machine Linked to A Synthesizer Audiates Geometric Illustrations by Musician Lamond Campbell

July 28, 2020

Grace Ebert

Beyond the scratch of the pen on paper, drawing as a practice isn’t thought to be particularly rhythmic or melodic. An inventive machine by musician Lamond Campbell, though, adds a musical component to its looped sketches. The Harmonograph Synthesiser is exactly as its name suggests: Campbell connected a modern, modular synthesizer to an 18th-Century harmonograph, an antiquated apparatus that uses pendulums to render geometric shapes. Two of the swinging mechanisms move linearly with the pen, while the third rotates with the board. Each triggers the synthesizer when movement occurs, which creates the corresponding audio track. An additional microphone picks up the noise of the pen.

Watch the video above to see the intricacies of the modified contraption. Campell is selling a complete, 18-track collection on his site, and you can find more about his multi-media creations on Instagram and YouTube. To see a reverse audio-visual process, check out “Visual Sounds of the Amazon II.” (thnx, Craig!)

 

 

 



Music

Seniors Quarantining in English Care Facility Recreate Iconic Album Covers

July 15, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images courtesy of Robert Specker

The next Johnny Cash or Taylor Swift might just be a resident of the Sydmar Lodge Care Home in Edgware, England. After being in lockdown for more than 120 days, the seniors at the assisted living facility decided to recreate some of the most iconic album covers, transforming themselves into Blink 182, Adele, and Bruce Springsteen in some amusing parodies.

The facility’s activities coordinator, Robert Specker, helmed the project—which includes Elvis Presley’s self-titled debut, Madonna’s True Blue, and David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane— and shared the full series in a now-viral post. You also might enjoy this similarly creative endeavor that inspired people to recreate famous artworks. (via Kottke)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Food Music

Dinnerware, Eggs, and Wine Shatter and Seamlessly Repair in Dramatic Film by Optical Arts

July 1, 2020

Grace Ebert

A new short film by Optical Arts depicts what would be a dinner-party nightmare: ceramic plates and bowls shatter, red wine cascades from long-stemmed glasses, and sharp knives dive to the floor. Despite its explosive scenes, “Tocatta” subsequently shows the same dinnerware, drinks, and plates of boiled eggs seamlessly repair and float upward as whole objects.

A multivalent consideration of physical contact, the word “tocatta” both originates from an Italian form of “to touch” and refers to a musical composition designed to showcase the performer’s refined techniques. The reparative film is set to the opening section of Johann Sebastian Bach’s Toccata and Fuge in D Minor, one of the German composer’s most recognized works. Because of its discordant runs, the musical piece historically has been used in horror films, like Rouben Mamoulian’s Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931), Terence Fischer’s The Phantom of the Opera (1962), and Norman Jewison’s dystopic Rollerball (1975).

Written for organ, the eerie composition adds a foreboding element to the film. The dramatic piece explores “the nature of time, the relentless violence of entropy and creative energy and its relationship to music itself,” the London-based creative studio writes in a statement. Another nod to the iconic composer, the dark, opening scenes are shots from Eisenach, Germany, where Bach was born and lived for the first few years of his life.

To dive further into Optical Arts’ productions, head to Vimeo and Instagram. (via The Morning News)

Update: A previous version of this article incorrectly identified the film as a CGI animation.

 

 

 



Music

An Open Pipeline Echoes This Inventive Saxophonist's Notes in Perfectly Tuned Accompaniment

June 30, 2020

Grace Ebert

Saxophonist Armin Küpper has mastered the effects of live looping without the necessary equipment to record and replay tracks. Instead, the musician heads to a nearby site storing a lengthy pipeline and positions his bell near the opening. As he plays, the delayed notes echo in perfect pitch, creating an polyphony as he blares out the next line. Check out more of Küpper’s tunes below, and head to YouTube to keep up with his inventive performances. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 

 



Music

2,292 Plants Fill the Audience in Opening Performance at Barcelona's Gran Teatre del Liceu

June 23, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Gran Teatre del Liceu, shared with permission

This week, Barcelona’s Gran Teatre del Liceu held its first performance with a live audience post-coronavirus, but it’s unclear whether the attendees were too green to appreciate Puccini’s “Crisantemi.” Seated in the red, velvet seats and among the gold balconies, 2,292 palms, ficus trees, and Swish cheese plants filled the iconic opera house to listen to the string quartet’s rendition.

A collaboration with Madrid-based artist Eugenio Ampudia and the Max Estrella gallery, the concert was meant to reflect on humans’ relationship with nature. “I thought why don’t we go into the Liceu like weeds, take it over and let nature start growing everywhere and turn it into something alive even when there are no people,” Ampudia said in an interview. After the performance, the leafy audience members were donated to healthcare workers who have been battling the virus during the last few months.