Art

Large-Scale Drawings of the United Kingdom’s 69 Cities by Carl Lavia

January 18, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Edinburgh, all images provided by Carl Lavia and Lorna Le Bredonchel

Self-taught artist Carl Lavia, who goes by the nickname “Sketch,” has been drawing intricate cities and architecturally-minded illustrations since he was the age of five. Although his early works were imaginative renderings of fictionalized cities, his practice has grown into immensely detailed depictions of large cities from an aerial point of view. Lavia uses ink and archival paper to produce each drawing, which appear like maps from a distance, but have a loose, almost Impressionist style when viewed up close.

In 2016 Lavia paired with photographer Lorna Le Bredonchel to form the project “#69Cities,” which aims to create a portrait of the whole United Kingdom through large-scale drawings of its 69 cities. It takes approximately 2-4 months for Lavia to create each drawing in the expansive project, with Le Bredonchel documenting the entire process from his wall-sized sketches to their time exploring each city by foot.

So far the duo has traveled to Birmingham and Manchester, England as well as Edinburgh, Dundee, Stirling, and Perth, Scotland. The completed Perth drawing will be on display at the Perth Museum and Art Gallery at the end of his month, and be on view through January 2020. When completed, Lavia and Le Bredonchel hope to develop an app that will allow visitors to explore each drawing in an immersive 3D landscape. You can follow along with the pair’s upcoming travels and future drawings on their website, Instagram, and Twitter.

City of Birmingham, all images provided by Carl Lavia and Lorna Le Bredonchel

City of Birmingham, all images provided by Carl Lavia and Lorna Le Bredonchel

Detail of Perth

Detail of Perth

Close up of Manchester

Close up of Manchester

Edinburgh

Edinburgh

 

Completed drawing of Manchester

Completed drawing of Manchester

 

 

 



Animation Design

Graphically Designed Ceramic Vessels Form Zoetrope Animations When Spun on a Pottery Wheel

January 18, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

After years of work as a ceramic artist, Kenny Sing of Turn Studio has created a series of shallow vessels which double as zoetrope animations when spun. His project, Trepō, transfers digital patterns onto the one-of-a-kind curves of his ceramic platters. The patterns are then either precisely cut from or glazed onto their surface. These elements act as static designs until they are activated by a pottery wheel. As the wheel turns, the patterns come to life: cubes, triangles, and rectangles appear to tumble into the center of the vessel. You can view the process for creating one of the ceramic vessels in the video below, and view more works on Turn Studio’s website, Instagram, and Vimeo. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art

Dried Grass and Branches are Woven and Stitched into Delicate Sculptural Drawings by Kazuhito Takadoi

January 18, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Kazuhito Takadoi uses natural materials combined with traditional Japanese art supplies like sumi ink and washi paper to make delicate sculptural works that tread between two and three dimensions. Takadoi cultivates and then gathers grass, leaves, and twigs from his garden to form the meticulous structures that comprise his dimensional drawings. Though these organic findings are secured in place through weaving and stitching, they continue to evolve as they dry and mature, changing in flexibility and color.

The artist, who is originally from Nagoya, Japan, trained in agriculture and horticulture in Japan, the US, and the UK before studying art and garden design in the UK. Takadoi is now based in Britain and is represented by jaggedart gallery in London. His work will be on view at Saatchi Gallery as part of Collect, an international modern craft and design fair, on view in London from February 23 until March 3, 2019.

 

 



Illustration

The Moon’s Magical Mythology Captured in an Illustrated Book by David Álvarez

January 17, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

In Noche Antigua (Ancient Night) an opossum and a rabbit work together—and against each other—to create and maintain the sun and the moon. The book, written in Spanish and illustrated by Mexico-based artist David Álvarez (previously) is based on elements from ancient myths in several Central American cultures. Álvarez captures a sense of quiet magic with the simplified forms and hushed tones of his illustrations, which seem to glow from the illumination of the moon. You can see more of the artist’s work on Instagram and his Etsy shop, and find a hardcover copy of Noche Antigua on Amazon.

 

 



Photography

A Traveling Exhibition of 100 Stunning Selections from the 2018 Wildlife Photographer of the Year

January 17, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

"The golden couple" by Marsel van Oosten, The Netherlands, Grand Title Winner 2018, Animal Portraits

“The golden couple,” Marsel van Oosten, The Netherlands, Grand Title Winner 2018, Animal Portraits

Last fall Dutch photographer Marsel van Oosten was the overall winner of the 54th annual Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition (previously) after being selected from over 45,000 submissions. His image, The Golden Couple, captures a pair of golden snub-nosed monkeys against a wooded backdrop. Their bright blue faces glow against the lush forest of China’s Qinling Mountains—the only habitat where the endangered primates are found in the wild.

In total there were 19 category winners from the tens of thousands who submitted images of wildlife and natural environments from all corners of the globe. Winning images included a wasp carrying a perfectly round segment of mud, two owls nestled snuggly in a pipe, and a leopard dreaming on a low branch. The winners, plus a selection of other entries from the competition, are currently in an exhibition which will travel to Canada, Spain, Australia, and Germany. The next stop for “Wildlife Photographer of the Year” is the Field Museum in Chicago, which opens March 22 and runs through January 2020. (via Block Club Chicago)

"Pipe owls," Arshdeep Singh, India, Winner 2018, 10 Years and Under

“Pipe owls,” Arshdeep Singh, India, Winner 2018, 10 Years and Under

"Hellbent," David Herasimtschuk, USA, Winner 2018, Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles

“Hellbent,” David Herasimtschuk, USA, Winner 2018, Behaviour: Amphibians and Reptiles

"Mud-rolling mud-dauber," Georgina Steytler, Australia, Winner 2018, Behaviour: Invertebrates

“Mud-rolling mud-dauber,” Georgina Steytler, Australia, Winner 2018, Behaviour: Invertebrates

"Night flight," Michael Patrick O’Neill, USA, Winner 2018, Under Water

“Night flight,” Michael Patrick O’Neill, USA, Winner 2018, Under Water

"Windsweep," Orlando Fernandez Miranda, Spain, Winner 2018, Earth’s Environments

“Windsweep,” Orlando Fernandez Miranda, Spain, Winner 2018, Earth’s Environments

"Mother defender," Javier Aznar González de Rueda, Spain, Winner 2018, Wildlife Photographer Portfolio Award

“Mother defender,” Javier Aznar González de Rueda, Spain, Winner 2018, Wildlife Photographer Portfolio Award

"Lounging leopard," by Skye Meaker, South Africa, Grand Title Winner 2018, 15-17 Years Old

“Lounging leopard,” Skye Meaker, South Africa, Grand Title Winner 2018, 15-17 Years Old

"Bed of seals," Cristobal Serrano, Spain, Winner 2018, Animals in their environment

“Bed of seals,” Cristobal Serrano, Spain, Winner 2018, Animals in their environment

 

 

 



Art Illustration

Layered Paintings by Betsy Walton Build Memory into Colorful Explorations of the Pacific Northwest

January 17, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Betsy Walton loosely imitates the landscape of Portland, Oregon in paintings infused with geodesic rocks and female subjects dressed as spellbinding goddesses. Walton works in layers, leaving some areas of the paintings bare with minimal sketches, while others have been painted, mixed with new media, or patched over multiple times.

“I paint over old versions of images so that there is a kind of memory to the painting,” she explains to Colossal. “I like being able to create an image that slowly unfolds. My hope is that a person looking at the finished work is able to have a long relationship with the image—lots of nuance to discover over time.”

Although Portland’s winters have become a primary point of inspiration, Walton likes to also bring in elements of travel by including flora that exist outside of the Pacific Northwest. She also includes natural phenomena or invisible structures that we might not see in everyday life, such as winding tree roots or the ribs of a female subject. “In each painting I am working through a kind of mindfulness process wherein I try to stay faithful to my ideas as they arise, even if I can’t explain it or it seems like a hard turn from where I started,” she explains. “It’s a delicate dance between unconditional acceptance of new ideas and subsequent editing phases where I try to refine the image and gain more clarity in the expression of the image’s story. ”

Walton’s first solo exhibition will open in May 2020 at Stephanie Chefas Projects in Portland. You can view more of her paintings on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Science

A Gigantic Circular Ice Patch Formed in a River in Westbrook, Maine

January 16, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

All images via City of Westbrook

Earlier this week a peculiar phenomenon was discovered in a section of the Presumpscot River in Westbrook, Maine. In the chilly winter waters a gigantic disk of ice had formed with a diameter just short of the river’s width. The floating patch was recently captured by the city in an aerial video. In the footage a nearby parking garage seems dwarfed by the mammoth proportions of the circular ice patch. According to Westbrook’s marketing and communications manager Tine Radel, the icy island has been spinning in a counterclockwise direction, and does not appear to be moving up or downstream. You can view an aerial tour of the floating ice patch (set to a pretty dramatic soundtrack) in the video produced by the City of Westbrook below. (via Earther)