Design Photography

Majestic Conservatories and Cozy Private Potting Sheds Showcase the Universal Appeal of Glass Greenhouses

October 16, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Gardens by the Bay, Singapore. All photographs © Haarkon

Photographer duo India Hobson and Magnus Edmondson (known collectively as Haarkon) celebrate the universal beauty and rich history of glass greenhouses in a new book, Glasshouse Greenhouse. Filled with verdant images of greenhouses from around the world, the book is divided into seven thematic chapters including History, Research, and Pleasure. Haarkon complement the visual storytelling with written reflections that explain each location and their experience in discovering it.

The UK-based pair travels widely for their editorial and commercial work as visual storytellers, and seeking out greenhouses has become a touchpoint in their explorations of new places. In an interview with the Telegraph, Hobson shares, “It’s a fusion of both botanicals and architecture, an odd but extremely satisfying mix of the organic and engineered which I think appeals to a broad range of [people]. To me, they are a universal language in some ways: the fusion of many cultures and countries all under one beautiful glass roof.”

Freshly published by Pavilion Books on October 4th, Glasshouse Greenhouse is Haarkon’s debut book and it is available on Amazon. You can see more from Hobson and Edmondson on their website and Instagram.

Tropical Display Dome, Brisbane Botanic Garden, Mount Coot-tha, Queensland, Australia

The Kibble Palace, Glasgow Botanic Gardens, Glasgow UK

University of Oxford Botanic Garden, Oxford UK

Barbican Conservatory, London UK

Gardens by the Bay, Singapore

Magnus Edmondson and India Hobson

 

 



Art

Animals and Statues Serve as the Protagonists of Startlingly Realistic Post-Apocalyptic Paintings by Josh Keyes

October 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Landfall” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

Portland-based artist Josh Keyes (previously) paints hyperrealistic depictions of what he perceives the world might look like after the fall of humans. Animals such as sharks, tigers, and bulls remain as the final witnesses to the aftermath of human destruction—observing blazing fires, investigating displaced commercial objects, and swimming amongst melted ice caps. Monuments and statues also remain in this post-apocalyptic world, like in the artist’s recent painting Siren, which observes a graffiti-covered angel with a horn being splashed with the ocean’s high tide. Keyes’s solo exhibition Tempest opens on October 13, 2018 and runs through November 3, 2018 at Thinkspace Projects in Los Angeles. You can see more of his paintings on his Instagram and website. (via Supersonic Art)

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 24"

“Siren” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 24″

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“End Zone” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

“The Meadow” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Ascent” (2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 24″ × 19″

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30" × 20"

“Stairway To Heaven”(2018), Acrylic on wood panel, 30″ × 20″

 

 



Art Craft Illustration

Hand-Sewn Portraits by Sheena Liam Capture Quiet Moments of Self Care

October 16, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Malaysian-born artist and model Sheena Liam (previously) creates self-portraiture through dark green thread and embroidery hoops. The hand-sewn images imitate her own subtle gestures from her day-to-day life, focusing on rituals of self care. “In a strange way modeling parallels my art in the sense I often have to use body language as means of expressing a certain sort of mood,” she explains. “It’s no different from my embroideries.”

Long locks flow off the canvas from sewn ponytails and braids, which give the monochromatic work a sense of movement from their static position on the wall. Liam’s first solo exhibition in France, Times New Romance, opens at Item Gallery in Paris on October 19, 2018 and runs through October 27, 2018. You can see more of her works on Instagram.

     

 

 

 

 

 



Art Dance Photography

Life-Size Origami Becomes a Fashion Statement in Dramatic Paper Costumes Worn by Ballet Dancers

October 15, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Melika Dez

Montreal-based artists Melika Dez and Pauline Loctin met in January 2018 and decide to combine their imaginations in a creative collaboration. The result, PLI.Ē Project, fuses Dez’s skills as a movement photographer with Loctin’s expertise in paper art, and showcases dancers around the world wearing hand-folded paper costumes. Loctin specifically formed each dress’s shape and color palette to the dancer who would be modeling it, and Dez worked to situate her models in iconic settings from the streets of New York City to the Louvre Museum in Paris. Loctin’s paper creations range from resembling traditional ballet tutus to intricately folded experimental shapes.

Dez shares that the project came together in two phases: first as a studio shoot with professional ballet dancers wearing Loctin’s creations, and later as a worldwide endeavor photographing dancers and costumes outside. “Paper can be a fragile material to work with and that is exactly why we decided to make the impossible, possible. No matter which element we would be confronted to, water (rain), wind, we wanted to show that we are limitless.”

The PLI.Ē Project photographs are on view in Montreal through November 4, 2018, and the duo hopes to shoot a second series of the work and eventually publish a photo book. You can see more from Loctin on Instagram and Facebook and from Dez on Instagram. (via fubiz)

 

 



Animation Art Design

A Vast Array of Urban Street Art Aerially Photographed and Digitally Cataloged by Oddviz

October 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Istanbul-based collective oddviz uses photogrammetry to documents the world in three dimensions. By merging together aerial and ground-level images, the team is able to form high resolution representations of humans, landscapes, and objects to preserve their position and appearance in a web, video, or virtual reality-based medium. For their latest project, Inventory, the team captured elements from urban infrastructure that are often found covered with tags, graffiti, and stickers.

Oddviz started the project by photographing objects in their own neighborhood of Kadıköy-Istanbul, but have expanded the project internationally to include the ancient wells and fountains of Venice and Berlin, and the fire hydrants, telephone booths, utility poles and statues found during a week-long trip to Manhattan. By capturing the street culture that accumulates in public spaces, the group is protecting ephemeral materials that might never be catalogued in a museum or white-walled gallery. “Using photogrammetry, we are documenting and protecting street culture in 3-dimensions with high-resolution texture,” they explain.

The collective has created several 4k images of their collections, in addition to two videos that guide their audience through their finds in Manhattan and Venice. You can watch the videos here, and view previous works by oddviz on their websiteInstagram, and Vimeo.

"Manhattan II" (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

“Manhattan II” (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

"Manhattan I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Manhattan I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kreuzberg I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Kreuzberg I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kadıköy II" (2018), 90 x 150 cm

“Kadıköy II” (2018), fine art print, 90 x 150 cm

"Venice I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Venice I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Venice II" (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

“Venice II” (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

 

 



Art Design

Lust For Light: A New Book of Illuminated Installations, Sculpture, and Images in Contemporary Art

October 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Liz West

Liz West

Once only used to illuminate a painting or photograph, light is now commonly used as the medium itself—glowing brightly from neon tubes, programmed as an interactive installation, projected to create an intangible feeling of warmth, or flashing as an LED spectacle. In her book Lust for Light published by Gingko PressHannah Stouffer (previously) culls the practices of a variety of artists such as Liz West, Miguel Chevalier, James ClarJun Hao Ong, and Yayoi Kusama to present a wide selection of more traditional and daring examples of light-based work.

Stouffer tells Colossal that while working for the last year and a half on the 376-page collection she was overwhelmed and humbled by the impact of light, while also fascinated by what it represents. “All of the artists in this book are working to recreate its likeness, utilize it as a source of their work, and capture the inspiring glow that it produces,” she continues. “There is both a fascination and familiarity with this elemental, undeniably appealing form of energy, which is both tangible and completely uncontainable.”

There will be a release party with art installations and projections at the Ace Hotel in Los Angeles on October 25th, 2018. You can now find Lust for Life on The Colossal Shop.

James Clar

James Clar

James Clar

James Clar

Phillip K. Smith III

Phillip K. Smith III

Signe Pierce

Signe Pierce

Jun Hao Ong

Jun Hao Ong

Robert Montgomery

Robert Montgomery

Yayoi Kusama

Yayoi Kusama

 

 

 



Art Craft

Memories of Youth Interwoven With Thousands of Minuscule Glass Beads

October 12, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

“Bedside Table” (2011)

Artist David Chatt explores his past, family, and memories in all-white works created using found objects and minuscule white beads. Whereas earlier work was more purely decorative, like his colorful Breakfast Set (2004), over the last several years Chatt has simplified his color palette and plumbed the emotional depths of his life for more emotionally-engaged work.

In pieces created over the past several years, Chatt has drawn specifically from his personal and family history, selecting meaningful objects like a boombox from the early 1980s, the contents of his late parents’ nightstand, and the tools his mother used to create innumerable meals. Using glass beads and thread, the artist carefully covers each object, and he describes the act of covering as a means of both sealing off and protecting his memories. He shares with Colossal, “This process has the power to transform an object that, might as easily be relegated to land fill, into something precious and a record of a time, place or experience, something that encourages my audience to reflect on their own experiences and complete the story that I have begun.”

Chatt studied design at Western Washington University, Bellingham, in the late 1980s, where he recalls that a 6-foot-five male pursuing beadwork was not warmly embraced. Over the years, he has continued to refine his beadwork through post-secondary study. You can see work from Chatt in a group exhibition at Denmark’s Glasmuseet Ebeltoft in 2019, and in “A New State of Matter: Contemporary Glass” at Boise Art Museum in Idaho from November 3, 2018 to February 3, 2019, a group show which includes work from Steffan Dam (previously) and Amber Cowan (previously). (thnx, Diana!)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

Detail, “Bedside Table” (2011)

“If She Knew You Were Coming…” (2015)

Detail, “If She Knew You Were Coming…” (2015)

Detail, “If She Knew You Were Coming…” (2015)

“1982” (2015)