Animation

Billions of Color Changing Particles Create Amorphous Waves in a New Art Film by Maxim Zhestkov 

August 14, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Volumes is a new 4K experimental art film by artist and director Maxim Zhestkov (previously) which explores the laws of nature through the interactions of billions of spherical particles. As the digitally produced elements collide they transform into a series of brilliant colors, morphing from black and grey orbs to pink, blue, and white balls and back again. The spheres combine to create sweeping waves that disperse and meld back together in large, amorphous forms. You can view more of the director’s projects on Vimeo, Instagram, and Behance.

 

 



Art

New Multi-Colored Sculptural Blobs Covered in Spongy Spikes by Dan Lam

August 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Amazonian,” all images provided by Dan Lam

Dan Lam (previously) creates brightly colored sculptural blobs that appear to drip from their installation on shelves. The polyurethane foam and epoxy resin works are covered in thousands of tiny spikes which are applied using a piping bag and acrylic paint. Lam creates time-lapse videos of this application, which offer satisfying peeks into her labor-intensive process. Lam has an upcoming solo exhibition at Stephanie Chefas Projects in Portland, Oregon which opens on October 5, and will be the artist-in-residence from October 8 to November 9, 2018 at Teton Art Lab in Jackson, Wyoming. You can see more of Lam’s soft, spike-covered sculptures on her Instagram.

"Convincing"

“Convincing”

"Damsel"

“Damsel”

"Healthy Glow"

“Healthy Glow”

"Spontaneous"

“Spontaneous”

"Under Your Skin"

“Under Your Skin”

 

 



Art Design

Sinuously Curved Benches Made with Thin Strips of Steam-Bent Hardwood

August 13, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Brooklyn-based furniture designer and sculptor Matthias Pliessnig creates sumptuous, twisting benches by steam-bending hardwood. He first developed the process in 2006 while studying wooden boat building techniques at the University of Wisconsin-Madison when he realized that by flipping his boat-inspired creations over, he could use the hollow form as a sturdy bench. Once he has designed his works using Rhinoceros 3-D software, Pliessnig places a strips of wood into a tube filled with hot steam. After ten minutes the wood is malleable enough to bend into his desired shape, but only for about 30 seconds. In eight hours, the wood is fully hardened, and back to its original strength. You can see more of the designer’s undulating furniture on his Instagram.

Photo: Sam Amil

 

 



Art

Multiple Perspectives Form Elaborately Detailed Cityscapes by Nathan Walsh

August 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

"Pier 17" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 50 inches

“Pier 17” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 50 inches, all images via Nathan Walsh

British artist Nathan Walsh (previously) creates oil painted cityscapes by combining reference images from a range of perspectives and angles. His latest work Catching Fire was created from a combination of photographs taken during three visits to New York City over a two year period. The painting more accurately captures the feeling of Times Square rather an exact representation, presenting multiple horizon points to make the viewer feel as if they are at the center of the neon-washed environment.

In addition to taking numerous photographs of his chosen location, Walsh also spends time sketching his surroundings in a series of thumbnail drawings. “Of late I’ve found the sketchbook to be of increasing importance even for notes on color or whatever I happen to be thinking about at the time,” he tells Colossal. “This immediate personal response to the environment plays an important role when I’m back in my studio in the United Kingdom and reliant on the photographs taken.”

Once he’s decided on the subject and scale of the painting, he draws in elements in a fairly loose and intuitive way. “Freehand drawing is fundamental to all of my work, allowing me to take full ownership of photographic material,” he explains. “Rejecting the mechanical transfer of imagery forces me to construct each object from scratch and allows for a fluid and inventive approach.”

By selecting segments from a variety of photographs of each scene, Walsh is able to construct his own reality of a space within an urban environment. This includes shifting key elements of his paintings into what he describes as different perspective “zones,” which he explains allows his works to more closely relate to how we experience a city while we are walking through it.

Over the last three years, Walsh’s paintings have begun to focus more heavily on the weather conditions present in a particular location, homing in on the reflective sidewalks produced during a rainstorm or the geometric bands of light that infiltrate an urban space during a bright, cloudless day. You can view of a selection of Walsh’s New York City paintings in his upcoming solo exhibition at Bernarducci Gallery in Manhattan, which opens September 6 and runs through September 29, 2018. More of Walsh’s cityscapes can be seen on his Instagram and Twitter.

"Catching Fire" (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

“Catching Fire” (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

Drawing for "Catching Fire" (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

Drawing for “Catching Fire” (2017), oil on canvas, 53 x 108 inches

"Lake Street' (2017), oil on linen, 34 x 52 inches

“Lake Street’ (2017), oil on linen, 34 x 52 inches

"ZBAR" (2016), oil on canvas, 51 x 115 inches

“ZBAR” (2016), oil on canvas, 51 x 115 inches

"Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

“Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail of "Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail of “Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail drawing of "Ed Koch" (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

Detail drawing of “Ed Koch” (2018), oil on canvas, 85 x 56 inches

"Peninsula" (2017), oil on canvas, 69 x 133 inches

“Peninsula” (2017), oil on canvas, 69 x 133 inches

 

 



Art Photography

Betta Fish Imitate Elegantly Posed Dancers in New Portraits by Visarute Angkatavanich

August 10, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Thai photographer Visarute Angkatavanich (previously) creates richly hued portraits that appear more like staged dance images than animal photography. It is only when staring directly at the bug-eyed expressions of his subjects that one understands they are staring at a fish and not a costumed ballerina. Angkatavanich photographs domesticated betta fish against white and black backgrounds to isolate their natural shades and present the illusion that they are moving through space. Late last year he released a book of Siamese fighting fish portraits titled Betta Paradiso. You can view more of his recent fish photography on 500px.

 

 



Art

Rugged Multi-Color Paintings by Dylan Gebbia-Richards Mirror the Textures of Molten Rock

August 10, 2018

Anna Marks

Credit: Wes Magyar

Credit: Wes Magyar

Breathtakingly colorful textures pop out when viewers first witness Dylan Gebbia-Richards’s large-scale paintings which appear to escape from their canvas. His rugged works mirror the structure of natural forms such as molten rock or coral. “I see my works as their own landscapes,” Gebbia-Richards tells Colossal. “I allow chance, the driving force behind all natural phenomena, to sculpt the structures of my paintings.”

Gebbia-Richards gains his inspiration from the vastness of the natural world and his artworks explore aesthetics that merge between the microscopic and macroscopic. “I find the enormity of the natural world awe-inspiring,” he esplains. “Landscapes which are immense seem intimate simultaneously; counter-intuitively these large spaces create the feeling of an embrace.”

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Thomas Meyers

While Gebbia-Richards’ paintings vary in size, all are built to engulf the viewer. “Sometimes this is very literal like in my room-sized installations which encompass those inside,” he says. “But even with my smaller pieces, I’m looking for the work to expand outwards, attempting to generate the feeling of a place which is much larger.” Like observing a mountain range, the scale of his paintings inspire and delight, while his use of a bold color palette adds a hint of magic to each creation.

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Stephen Ironside

Credit: Dylan Gebbia-Richards

The artist’s works appear as if they have been created through a volcanic eruption. To imitate this process, he constructs his paintings by using colored pigment and droplets of melted wax. “I initially found dripping and splattering melting wax very satisfying,” says Gebbia-Richards. “I was interested in the qualities of the marks the melted wax produced, specifically the chaotic patterns of the splatters which sprung from the drip’s impact with the paper I was melting over.”

His paintings emerge by separating the dripping marks from their splatter. It is these random interactions between the various pigments, drip gestures, and the splatter which creates Gebbia-Richards’s layered textures that are signature to his practice. You can see one of the Colorado artist’s paintings at Looking For U at Unit London which runs until August 26, 2018. To view more of his work visit his website and Instagram.

Credit: Thomas Meyers

Credit: Steven Ironside

Credit: Danielle Webster

Credit: Thomas Meyers

 

 



Photography

Nigerian Hair Culture Documented in Rainbow-Hued Portraits by Medina Dugger

August 9, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Purple Kinky Calabar. All photographs © Medina Dugger

Lagos-based photographer Medina Dugger documents colorful hair culture in the coastal Nigerian city with her ongoing series Chroma. The collection of portraits pays homage to J.D. ‘Okhai Ojeikere, a renowned African photographer who documented women’s hairstyles in Nigeria for over 50 years, starting in the mid-20th century.

Prior to decolinization, Dugger explains, wigs and straightening had replaced much of the indigenous hair culture, and ‘Okhai Ojeikere’s documentations sought to celebrate traditional hairdos. She continues, “African hair braiding methods date back thousands of years and Nigerian hair culture is a rich and often extensive process which begins in childhood. The methods and variations have been influenced by social/cultural patterns, historical events and globalization. Hairdos range from being purely decorative to conveying deeper, more symbolic understandings, revealing social status, age and tribal/family traditions.”

While ‘Okhai Ojeikere’ images were in black and white, Dugger updates the documentary style with brightly colored backgrounds, a diverse array of vibrant contemporary fashion, and rainbow hues integrated into the hairstyles with thread, beads, and dyed extensions. You can see more of Dugger’s colorful editorial photography on her website and Instagram.

Blue Coiling Penny Penny

Blue Beri Beri

Golden Eggs

Left: Purple Irun Kiko / Right: Pink Buns

Yellow Tip Twist

Emerald Abebe

Aqua Suku

Left: Violet Irun Kiko / Right: Yellow Monocle

Pink Didi with Cowry Shell

Blue Star Koroba

Calabar Bun Trio