Art

Models with Albinism Challenge Standards of Beauty in Photographs by Justin Dingwall

August 24, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Photographer Justin Dingwall (previously) continues to challenge how the public perceives and defines beauty. In his photo series “Albus,” butterflies and snakes rest on models with albinism as symbols of transformation and change. The images are a celebration of diversity and an invitation for viewers to question and rethink conventional beauty standards.

The series includes portraits of model Sanele Junior Xaba and South African model, lawyer, and activist Thando Hopa, the first woman with albinism to grace the cover of Vogue. Dingwall uses light and dark in his work for contrast, but also symbolically to represent truth and an unenlightened state. The photographer also uses water in some of the photographs to indicate change and self- reflection.

“They are not about race or fashion, but about perception, and what we subjectively perceive as beautiful,” Dingwall in a statement. “I wanted to create a series of images that resonate with humanity and make people question what is beautiful…To me diversity is what makes humanity interesting and beautiful.”

To see more of Justin Dingwall’s work, give him a follow over on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Second Hand: Ceramic Dresses, Shorts, and Other Faux Garments Created From Found Ceramic Tiles by Zhanna Kadyrova

August 23, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Image courtesy FOAF Prague

Ukrainian artist Zhanna Kadyrova creates sculptural representations of clothing from found ceramic tiles which are often displayed in situ. She began the series, Second Hand, while in Sao Paulo in 2014 after discovering the rich decorative patterns of tiles used to cover Brazil’s shops, cafes, and residential buildings. For her first works, she bought several styles of “second hand” tiles which she then constructed into garment-like objects which were displayed on standard wooden hangers.

For the series, Kadyrova has also worked with a silk factory in the Ukraine in 2015, and sourced tiles from the Film Processing Department of the Kiev Cinema Copy Factory in 2017. This year, she produced an installation for the Galleria Continua in Cuba which runs through August 25, 2019, and will have work on view at FOAF Prague later this month. You can see more samples from her series Second Hand, in addition to finding more ceramic sculptures of everyday objects, on her website. (via Trendland, Visual Fodder)

 

 



Animation Science

A Digital Animation Explores the Height of Trees From a 3-Inch Bonsai to a 300-Foot Sequoia

August 23, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In this calming video by Red Side, a variety of tree species are compared side-by-side. The animation spans different common and more unique tree types, starting with 3-inch Keshitsubo bonsai tree and moving all the way to a towering Sequoia sempervirens. In addition to the subtly billowing trees, the video also contains some human-made landmarks that help to add context, like the Leaning Tower of Pisa, a rocket, and the Statue of Liberty. You can see more of Red Side’s animations, like this animal population video or tornado comparison, on Youtube. (via The Morning News)

 

 



Art Design Food

Cheese Slices, Condiments, and Other Object Collections Bound into Books by Ben Denzer

August 23, 2019

Andrew LaSane

“20 SLICES of American Cheese” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

Toying with the concept of what a book can be, American designer Ben Denzer (through his publishing house Catalog Press) binds unusual collections of objects to create humorous volumes that you’re unlikely to find in a library. The limited edition books have been sold in the Whitney Shop, landing in the hands of a few lucky collectors. The unique objects have also found their way into the collections of museums and universities around the world.

A graphic designer with a degree in Architecture and Certificate in the Visual Arts, Denzer has created books of bound cheese slices, ketchup and sweetener packets, napkins, sequentially numbered dollar bills, and other books. The covers and spines feature the Catalog Press logo as well as well bold text announcing what the “reader” will find inside. In an interview with Its Nice That, Denzer shared his stance on books as “both content and object; simultaneously sculpture and catalog, singular contained multitudes.” He added that through Catalog Press he can “use the idea of the book as a catalogue to explore these wackier ideas while at the same time experimenting with more constrained design moves.”

Ben Denzer’s exploration of books can also be seen in his Ice Cream Books project which pairs real books with their ice cream complement. To see more of his work, check out his online portfolio and follow Denzer on Instagram.

“20 SLICES of American Cheese”Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“5 KETCHUPS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“5 KETCHUPS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“INFLATABLE BOOK JACKET” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“$200 IN ORDER” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“FOUR FLIP BOOKS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“15 MASS MARKET PAPERBACKS” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“30 NAPKINS from The Plaza Hotel” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

“200 FORTUNES” Image: Ben Denzer/Catalog Press

 

 



Art Design Food

Le Corbuffet: Conceptual Cookbook Presents Art-Inspired Recipes as Contemporary Sculptures

August 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

From the mind of Esther Choi comes a new cookbook titled Le Corbuffet: Edible Art and Design Classics. The writer, photographer, and artist has compiled a list of recipes inspired by artists, designers, and their creations, all staged in contemporary arrangements. Recipes seek to distill the practices of figures such as Frida Kahlo and Barbara Kruger into their best and most delicious aspects—like the crisp and bright Frida Kale-o Salad, or the crimson-colored and acerbic Rhubarbara Kruger Compote.

The idea was first launched during a series of participatory dinner parties Choi hosted in 2015 after discovering a 1937 menu designed by artist László Moholy-Nagy for Bauhaus founder and architect Walter Gropius. After creating her own set of detailed dishes, she decided to compile them into a book that would be a playful spin on the artists she admired.

“I hosted the first in a series of ‘Le Corbuffets’ in my Brooklyn apartment, a project which carried on until 2017,” she explains on her website. “Offering meals to an assortment of guests, these social gatherings revolved around the consumption of absurd, pun-inspired dishes that referred to canonical artists and designers. As a commentary on the status of art, food, and design as commodities to be ‘gobbled up’ by the market, the project deliberately twisted idioms to explore the notion of ‘aesthetic consumption’ though taste and perception.”

Le Corbuffet will be published October 1, 2019. You can see her photographs, in additions to snippets of recipes from what she describes as “a conceptual artwork in the form of a cookbook” in the following images, and learn more about her art and writing by following her on Instagram.

 

 



Colossal Design

New in the Colossal Shop: The 1000-Piece Full Moon Puzzle

August 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Toronto, Ontario-based Four Point Puzzles utilized high-resolution NASA imagery to create a circular full moon puzzle. The rounded object invites a unique challenge for those used to rectangular puzzles, and when finished it reaches a 26.5″ diameter. The 1000-piece puzzle is newly available to The Colossal Shop, joining color-changing, geode-shaped, and other puzzles inspired by the moon.

 

 



Design

A Dyed Wool Cloak Made From Scratch in the Chinese Countryside by Li Ziqi

August 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Li Ziqi (previously) presents pastoral glimpses into daily life on her farm in the countryside of China through her Youtube channel. She records common projects and necessities with precision and care, often focusing on the tasks needed to created a multi-course traditional meal or demonstrating the ways she prepares for the region’s harsh winters. In a video from earlier this year, Li walks her audience through the steps of knitting and dying a floor-length purple cloak with wool sourced from a neighboring farm. The five-minute film follows her journey across the snow-strewn mountains, watches as she inspects and brushes out the gathered wool, and features cameos by a few puppies and a very tiny lamb. You can view more snippets from her life on Facebook and Youtube. (via swissmiss)