Art

Curved Lenses Multiply Everyday Views of Paris in a New Mobile Installation by Vincent Leroy

March 22, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

All photographs © Vincent Leroy

Slow Lens is the newest piece from French artist Vincent Leroy, who often explores optics and light in his large-scale installation work. The piece is suspended from above, and a network of curved, translucent lenses distorts the viewer’s perspective. Displayed en plein air, the connected lenses slowly rotate and ofter multiplied visions of the surrounding environment. Leroy installed and documented Slow Lens in various locations around Paris, including in highway lanes that were vacant due to pollution-induced city traffic restrictions.

The artist shares with Colossal that he seeks to spark a focus on detail, and inspire contemplation and dreaming, and notes that the work is particularly abstract when viewed at night. You can watch a brief video below that shows Slow Lens in motion. Vincent Leroy is represented by Denise Rene Gallery in Paris. The artist shares more of his work on Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Animation

Watch Sliced Fruits and Vegetables Disappear Before Your Eyes in Vibrant Animations by Kevin Parry

March 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Kevin Parry creates stop-motion animations that turn the quotidian task of slicing vegetables and fruit into a near psychedelic exploration of each food’s interiors. Through a common technique called strata-cut, the Toronto-based animator creates videos that slowly peel away the exteriors of peppers, avocados, and onions, revealing patterns we might not notice while preparing a simple stir-fry or stew. Although Parry is used to taking his time perfecting each frame, for this series he had to race against the clock to avoid the organic materials browning or losing their vivacious color. Make sure to watch the full video below to take a look behind-the-scenes of his process, and hear the sound effects Parry created by cutting, crunching, and chewing each featured food. You can see more of his animations on Instagram and Youtube.

 

 



Art

KAWS Floats a Massive Inflatable Sculpture in Hong Kong’s Victoria Harbour

March 22, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Photo Credit: @AllRightsReserved

Photo Credit: @AllRightsReserved

COMPANION, a 121-foot-long inflatable sculpture by street artist KAWS, launched today at Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong. The reclined, monochrome figure is the largest to date for the American artist, with recent previous iterations of the project installed at the Chiang Kai Shek Memorial Hall in Taipei, Taiwan, and on Seokchon Lake in Seoul, South Korea. The figure was purposefully designed to be in a peaceful repose, its crossed-out eyes gazing at the sky above.

“I was thinking of all the tension in the world, and I wanted to create work that would make people think about relaxing,” KAWS recently told TIME. “And there’s nothing more relaxing than lying on your back in water and looking up at the sky.”

To get the monumental work far enough into the water, tugboats pulled the sculpture from Wanchai to the waterfront off Tamar Park until it reached the Central Harbourfront. The event was celebrated with a water spray performance by the Hong Kong Fireboat 1 Elite. The work was launched by Hong Kong-based creative studio AllRightsReserved for the annual Hong Kong Arts Month, and will continue to occupy the harbor until March 31, 2019. (via Artsy)

Photo Credit: @harimaolee

Photo Credit: @harimaolee

Photo Credit: @NK7

Photo Credit: @NK7

Photo Credit: @cheukyh

Photo Credit: @cheukyh

Photo Credit: @AllRightsReserved

Photo Credit: @AllRightsReserved

Photo Credit: @AllRightsReserved

Photo Credit: @AllRightsReserved

Taipei installation, image via #AllRightsReserved

Taipei installation, image via #AllRightsReserved

Taipei installation, image via #AllRightsReserved

Taipei installation, image via #AllRightsReserved

 

 



Photography Science

Self-Taught Nature Photographer Alison Pollack Tracks the Fascinating Fungi of Northern California

March 21, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Stemonitis

Stemonitis. All photographs by Alison Pollack

Avid photographer and retired environmental consultant Alison Pollack documents the fascinating phenotypes of mushrooms and slime molds she encounters on hikes in northern California. Her images show shaggy white Comb Tooth fungus (Hericium coralloides), Stemonitis slime molds that wouldn’t look out of place on the dessert menu of an experimental restaurant, and Comatricha that bear a strong resemblance to urban lamp posts. Recently, the north Bay Area-based photographer shared with the Marin Independent Journal that she has had a longtime interest in hiking and mushrooming, but has grown more focused on fungi photography in the last two years. You can follow along with Pollock’s findings, and help her identify unknown species, on Instagram.

Hericium coralloides

Chlorociboria aeruginascens

Tyromyces chioneus

Tyromyces chioneus

Hericium erinaceus

L: Comatricha / R: Hemitrichia calyculata

Crepidotus mollis

Physarum viride

Trametes versicolor

Mycena

 

 



Design

A Cherry Blossom-Inspired Torch Will Kick Off the Tokyo 2020 Olympics

March 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Yesterday, on the first day of spring, the Tokyo 2020 Olympics torch was revealed to the public at a press conference in the hosting city. The floral design is inspired by Japan’s cherry blossom, a flower celebrated in festivals across the country each March. Conceptualized by Tokujin Yoshioka, the torch features five petal-shaped cylinders that will each contain a flame, and is constructed from aluminum waste from temporary housing built after the Great East Japan Earthquake.

The materials and blossom concept are meant to reinforce the upcoming Olympic Torch Relay concept, “Hope lights our way,” delivering a message of support and unification as the torch is carried to the New National Stadium for the opening ceremonies. The official relay will be held for 121 days, beginning March 26, 2020, and be passed to 80-90 runners each day. Relay ambassadors for next year’s event include three-time judo Olympic gold medallist Tadahiro Nomura, three-time Paralympian Aki Taguchi, and actress Satomi Ishihara. You can see a 360-degree view of the cherry blossom design in the video below. (via Spoon & Tamago)

 

 



Art

Over 10,000 Tree Samples Compose a Modular Cave-Like Installation at the Royal Fort Gardens

March 21, 2019

Anna Marks

Credits: Katie Paterson & James Cohan, New York. Photos by Max McClure

Credits: Katie Paterson & James Cohan, New York. Photos by Max McClure

Situated within the Royal Fort Gardens at The University of Bristol, British designer Katie Paterson and architects Zeller & Moye collaborated on Hollow, a wooden installation that illustrates the diversity of tree species found across the globe. From the outside the sculptural work appears as a series of rectangles made from a similar, light colored sample of wood, yet when one enters the modular elements break into wooden blocks of all shapes, sizes, and hues. Clustered rectangular structures emerge from the ceiling and floor of the cave-like public art piece like stalactites and stalagmites. The structures are composed of a range of wood samples, including ones that evolved millions of years ago to far more recent examples. 

During three years of research and sourcing Paterson collected over 10,000 tree samples from various sources, including the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, the Arnold Arboretum at Harvard University and Yakushima, known as one of the wettest, forest-filled islands surrounding Japan. The collection also features a piece of wood from the Indian Banyan Tree, a fig tree where Buddha achieved enlightenment, the Japanese Ginkgo tree, and the Metuselah tree, found in the White Mountains in eastern California, which at 4,850 years old, is believed to be one of the oldest trees in the world.

Hollow is an ethereal environment for both play and meditation, and resembles a forest canopy with patches of light dappling in from the ceiling. The construction illustrates the detailed beauty of the natural world, and is poignant reminder of the importance of appreciating and maintaining our fragile natural environment. To step virtually into the permanent installation, visit Hollow‘s website

 

 



Photography

The View From Down Under: “Under-Cats” Celebrates Cats at a New Angle

March 20, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Felines at the International Cat Show in Kaunas, Lithuania were already ready for their closeup, but they might not have been expecting these glass-bottomed glamour shots. Photographer Andrius Burba began shooting at this unique angle in 2015 with cats on a black background. In the intervening years he has documented dogs, rabbits, bicycles, and even horses. The most recent iteration swaps out the black backdrops for bright colors. Burba explains to Colossal that he places each subject on a glass surface (though we’d hazard a guess the horses stood on a sturdier material) and shoots from below, with the backdrop placed above the animal. The resulting photographs show the unique fur, eyes, and personalities of each cat, as they strike poses that convey curiosity, boredom, or annoyance. You can see the full collection from Under-Cats on the Underlook website. Underlook also shares updates on Instagram and Facebook, and offers merch in their online store. (via Design You Trust)