Art Food

Donut Worry Be Happy: Pop Culture References on Expertly Glazed Ceramic Donuts by Jae Yong Kim

December 11, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

South Korean ceramicist Jae Yong Kim creates deliciously glazed donuts out of clay, glitter, and swarovski crystals. The faux desserts present a glossy perfection in their paint application, yet contain an irregularity in shape to trick the eye into believing they might be an edible treat.

Kim chooses patterns and images that evoke a sense of pop culture both past and present, with several pieces imitating the style of famous painters such as the splattered marks of Jackson Pollack or concentric dots of Yayoi Kusama. These references, alongside their presentation as food, ask the audience to consider what they are really consuming when viewing his small, spherical works.

“Without my intention, references to Pop Art have been a consistent occurrence throughout the entirety of the donut artworks,” said Kim in a statement. “Questioning myself regarding the donuts falling in line with a specific genre has brought questions and need for understanding. Each individual donut has invariably read to me as a small painting; color, pattern and physicality have been the ultimate procedure for my personal expression.”

Kim is a graduate of the Hartford Art School and Cranbrook Academy of Art. Kim splits his time between Korea and New York, and works form a studio in Jersey City, NJ. You can see more of his donut-based paintings on his Instagram, and take a look at previous ceramic works on his website. (via Design Milk)

 

 



Art Photography

Everyday Objects Obsessively Organized into Patterns by Adam Hillman

December 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

New Jersey-based “object arranger” Adam Hillman has really stepped up his organization efforts the last few months, pushing his precisely organized patterns of everyday objects into increasingly more complicated designs. Everything from breakfast cereal to office supplies finds its place in these tightly controlled symmetrical layouts that take hours to measure, cut, and arrange. Hillman now shares some of his best work as prints and you can follow him on Instagram.

 

 



Colossal

New in The Colossal Shop: Posters, Advanced Yoga Poses, and More

December 8, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Jay Ryan

As the year wraps up we’ve got a host of new products in The Colossal Shop. Fun new additions include affordable signed artist prints by Chicago-area poster maker Jay Ryan, a new cohort of Series Two Yoga Joes, imaginative bedding that turns your kiddo into an astronaut, and handmade ceramics by Philadelphia artist Brian Giniewski (who might sound familiar). Plus great host gifts like hand-painted Mexican chocolate truffle sets and TODAY, a new clock that redefines time. This and more can be found over in The Colossal Shop!

 

 



Art Design Science

Artist Philip Beesley Merges Chemistry, Artificial Intelligence, and Interactivity to Create “Living” Architecture

December 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Astrocyte, 2017. All images by Philip Beesley and Alex Willms / PBAI.

Multidisciplinary artist and architect Philip Beesley weaves together such a broad array of technologies and systems in his artworks that they legitimately defy description, but the immediate impact of encountering these sprawling interactive installations is visceral and awe-inspiring. His latest work, Astrocyte, connects chemistry, artificial intelligence, and an immersive soundscape to create a living piece of architecture that responds to the presence of viewers. Comprised of 300,000 individual components, the piece was on view against the industrial backdrop at Toronto’s port lands for EDIT: Expo for Design, Innovation & Technology last October. From a statement about the project:

The structure is made up of resilient, lightweight meshworks of thermally formed acrylic, laser-cut into geometrical patterns optimized for production with minimal waste. This unique space truss system is part of the Living Architecture Systems’ pioneering research into resilient and adaptable structures. Astrocyte’s structural mesh components use overlapping strands of material in doubly-curved conical forms that achieve extraordinary strength from minimal material. These innovative forms are clustered together in bundles that are similar to the multiple filaments spanning between outer and inner shells of natural bone structures.

The piece further incorporates 3D-printed lighting components and masses of custom glasswork that contain a combination of oil, inorganic chemicals, and other solutions to form a sort of chemical skin. At the core of Beesley research is the question of whether architecture can truly be “alive,” opening the possibility for self-repairing structures or deeply responsive organic environments, where artificial intelligence exists at almost every level of design. Regardless of the complexity and heady ideas, the works are deeply aesthetically intriguing, something directly out of science fiction.

Beesley is the director of the Living Architecture Systems Group and a professor at the School of Architecture at the University of Waterloo. You can explore much more of his work on his website and along with several videos and interviews on Vimeo. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art Photography

Interactive LED Sculpture Projects Visitors’ Faces 14-Feet-Tall in Columbus, OH

December 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

As We Are is a 14-foot interactive sculpture by artist Matthew Mohr. The head-shaped work slowly rotates through a database of faces, displaying a range of Columbus residents and its visitors on 24 horizontal bands of LED screens. The monitors wrap nearly 360 degrees around the piece, leaving a gap for a photo studio where guests can pose for pictures that will be featured on work’s screens.

The sculpture is currently installed in the Greater Columbus Convention Center, a public venue primed for eager visitors who wish to see their faces projected more than two times their height. Its appearance reflects a few other body-centric public sculptures, namely David Cerny’s banded replication of Franz Kafka’s head in Prague, and Chicago’s Crown Fountain by Jaume Plensa which also displays a rotating cast of faces across a series of LED screens.

“‘As We Are’ presents Columbus as a welcoming, diverse culture where visitors and residents can engage on multiple levels through an interactive experience with public art,” says Mohr in an artist statement about the interactive structure. “It is an open-ended, conceptual piece that explores how we represent ourselves individually and collectively, asking participants to consider their identity in social media and in public. It asks all viewers to contemplate portraits of people from different ethnicities, and gender identities.”

Mohr also explains that the scale and location of the sculpture brings monumental recognition to each featured face, allowing the individual to be memorialized, if only for a few seconds. You can see more projects by the artist and Columbus College of Art and Design professor on his website, and view a video documenting several participants’ interactions with the sculpture below. (via Designboom)

 

 

 



Craft

Cristian Marianciuc Creates a New Decorated Origami Paper Crane Daily for 1,000 Days

December 7, 2017

Christopher Jobson

When we last mentioned origami enthusiast Cristian Marianciuc he had just completed the creative challenge of designing a new decorative origami crane daily for 365 days. But then… he didn’t stop. For nearly three years, Marianciuc continued to produce a vast flock of 1,000 paper birds decorated with all manner of leaves, beads, thread, flowers, feathers, and other materials too numerous to list. You can explore all of them on Instagram and a few of his paper works are available on Etsy.

 

 



Design History Photography

The Wild Architecture of Soviet-Era Bus Stops Photographed by Christopher Herwig

December 6, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Christopher Herwig has circled the former Soviet Union, exploring the most remote areas of Georgia, Russia, and Ukraine to find and photograph its unique bus stops. After the success of his first book Soviet Bus Stops, he decided to explore the subject matter again for his new follow-up collection Soviet Bus Stops Volume II. In this book Herwig focuses on Russia rather than its former Soviet counterparts, driving nearly 10,000 miles around the massive country finding its incredibly diverse transportation shelters.

These architectural forms are more deeply explored in a forward by architecture and culture critic Owen Hatherley, who details the government policies that have allowed the bus stops to remain. You can view more of the Jordan-based photographer’s work on his website and Vimeo. (via Design You Trust)