Animation

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Animation

Asleep on the Train: A Puppeteered Music Video Explores the Wishful Daydreams Embedded in a Daily Commute

October 25, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Asleep on the Train is a puppeteered music video for musician Tom Rosenthal’s new single by animator and director Catherine Prowse. The stop motion short film follows a businessman as his daily commute gets wildly off-track, leaving the audience to guess if his adventure was real or only acted out in a wishful dream. A rich blue and orange color scheme is used in the design of both the train and the surrounding landscape, which stylistically connects the protagonist’s commute to the scenery he explores during his nostalgic escape.

Prowse explains that the video “speaks to our latent desires to escape the mundanity of our existence, and yet acknowledges the futility of our dreams in which we hide away from the world.” You can watch a behind-the-scenes teaser for the new animation in the video below, and see more of Prowse’s stop motion films on her website. (Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Animation Music

A Dizzying Visual Experiment Animates 19 Hours of Single-Shot Video

October 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

In a new music video for the musician and DJ Max Cooper (previously), Páraic McGloughlin (previously) turns a single viewpoint over an anonymous highway into a nearly five-minute-long psychedelic collage. The Irish film director was tasked with “visualizing the Platonic realm of form underlying reality,” writes Cooper in a statement about the video. To do so McGloughlin situated himself on a bridge in Sligo, Ireland for 19 hours, to create a single, day-long shot that he then manipulated. The final result is a dizzying mashup of visual effects. Grids, spirals, and pixels  composed of the original video footage flash and swirl across the screen, showing the viewer snapshots of the sky, highway, and grassy hills.

“Aesthetically I love the mix of abstraction and realism and this was a great place for me to explore this,” McGloughlin shares. “Using a fundamental image (a time lapse) to mask and cut into, I tried to show the variable possibilities within a limited time span, maintaining the integrity of each individual photograph while dissecting and rearranging the overall image.” The visual content was matched with each layer of audio created by Cooper to form the song, which stacks up to over one hundred layers. You can watch more videos from McGloughlin on Vimeo and Instagram, and discover Cooper’s music on his website and SoundCloud. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Animation Design

Video Game Designers Show the Carefully Orchestrated Movements That Bring Their Stop Motion Characters to Life

October 18, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Vokabulantis is an episodic video game by author Morten Søndergaard, animator Johan Oettinger, and puppet animation studio Wired Fly. The team used stop motion to animate the two main characters—Kurt and Karla—which the player leads through a series of language-based puzzles. The intention of the interactive universe it to bring a tangibility to language, creating a space where users can interact with its form rather than merely read through static text on a screen.

The single player game is a mix between a point and click adventure and a puzzle-based platform, which allows the user to explore worlds while they complete brain teasers or tasks with the two main characters. The game was initially developed for PC, but may be adapted for console-based platforms or handheld devices down the line when it is released in 2019. You can follow updates regarding the release of the Kong Orange-produced game on Vokabulantis’s website, and take a look behind the making of the stop-motion game in the video below.

Vokabulantis's characters Kurt and Karla

Vokabulantis’s characters Kurt and Karla

 

 



Animation Art Design

A Vast Array of Urban Street Art Aerially Photographed and Digitally Cataloged by Oddviz

October 15, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Istanbul-based collective oddviz uses photogrammetry to documents the world in three dimensions. By merging together aerial and ground-level images, the team is able to form high resolution representations of humans, landscapes, and objects to preserve their position and appearance in a web, video, or virtual reality-based medium. For their latest project, Inventory, the team captured elements from urban infrastructure that are often found covered with tags, graffiti, and stickers.

Oddviz started the project by photographing objects in their own neighborhood of Kadıköy-Istanbul, but have expanded the project internationally to include the ancient wells and fountains of Venice and Berlin, and the fire hydrants, telephone booths, utility poles and statues found during a week-long trip to Manhattan. By capturing the street culture that accumulates in public spaces, the group is protecting ephemeral materials that might never be catalogued in a museum or white-walled gallery. “Using photogrammetry, we are documenting and protecting street culture in 3-dimensions with high-resolution texture,” they explain.

The collective has created several 4k images of their collections, in addition to two videos that guide their audience through their finds in Manhattan and Venice. You can watch the videos here, and view previous works by oddviz on their websiteInstagram, and Vimeo.

"Manhattan II" (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

“Manhattan II” (2018), diasec print, 106 x 250 cm

"Manhattan I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Manhattan I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kreuzberg I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Kreuzberg I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Kadıköy II" (2018), 90 x 150 cm

“Kadıköy II” (2018), fine art print, 90 x 150 cm

"Venice I" (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

“Venice I” (2018), diasec print, 150 x 266 cm

"Venice II" (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

“Venice II” (2018), fine art print, 80 x 175 cm

 

 



Animation Design

Satisfying Looped Animations Inspired by Interior Design Elements

October 2, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Motion graphics artist Andreas Wannerstedt designs short animated loops that present invented machines performing mesmerizing tasks. His videos are often inspired by real-world interior design, and incorporate elements such as rose gold, dark wood grains, and tropical Monstera leaves. The works are published under a series of iterations titled “Oddly Satisfying” which he posts to his Instagram and Vimeo accounts. You can see additional projects by the Swedish designer on his website. (via Vice)

 

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A post shared by Andreas Wannerstedt (@wannerstedt) on

 

 



Animation Illustration

A Hand-Drawn Animation of Merging Faces and Morphing Bodies by Daniel Zvereff

September 28, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Brooklyn-based artist Daniel Zvereff works in a combination of drawing, photography, and videography and all three come into play in an animated short. The three minute long film is a music video for Norwegian singer-songwriter Okay-Kaya‘s song “Emulate”. It is a departure from her other music videos, which usual feature the singer herself in live action scenarios. Throughout the video, pieces of unbound notebook paper show shifting blue drawings. Ranging from moving faces to animals and planets, as well as abstract shapes, the drawings are all executed in simple line work, in a unified blue hue. You can see more of Zvereff’s work on his website and Flickr. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)

 

 



Animation

Hoards of Anonymous Figures React to a User-Controlled Character in an Interactive World by Universal Everything

September 18, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

UK design studio Universal Everything (previously) is in the midst of crafting an experimental open-world environment called Emergence, available in a preview film. In Emergence, the glowing yellow user-controlled character is surrounded by crowds of anonymous people who react to the character’s movements. The scenes are set in a variety of abstracted but familiar environments like city streets and under water. Presumably, the viewer will be able to control the figure in a VR or immersive gallery setting. Universal Everything explains the experience on their Vimeo page:

Emergence is an open-world environment, expressing the primal feeling of maintaining your individual identity whilst being part of a crowd. As you immerse yourself in a crowd of thousands, shafts of light beckon you closer. As you touch the light, the environment – its atmosphere, its gravity and the choreography of the crowd – transform in powerful ways, continually challenging your perception.

Universal Everything was founded by Matt Pyke, who leads a variety of digital artists, animators, musicians, and developers in creating a wide variety of digital projects. Another notable project from the studio is a Sydney Opera House’s Living Mural collaboration, where digital murals from artists around the world were projected on to the Opera House’s iconic nesting rooflines. You can see more from Universal Everything on Vimeo and Instagram, and the studio also has a solo exhibition of their work on view until February 2019 at Borusan Contemporary in Istanbul. (via The Awesomer)

 

 

A Colossal

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Lust for Light