Art

Section



Art Food

Insatiable Mouths and Fingers Rouse a Delicate Tea Set by Artist Ronit Baranga

September 14, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Ronit Baranga, shared with permission

Israeli artist Ronit Baranga (previously) embodies voracious appetites by merging anatomical parts, desserts, and serving ware in an evocative ceramic series titled All Things Sweet and PainfulDextrous fingers balance a plate and manage to swipe a bit of frosting from a cupcake. Whether implanted in a fruity pie or a teacup, gaping mouths clamor for a taste of the pastries and stick their tongues out for a taste.

In a statement, Baranga explains that the surreal series is focused on luxurious foods. “The mixed emotions of need and the insatiable hunger for more – more sugar, more attention, more love. There is a constant push against the boundaries of rational consumption, craving the sugar rush, forever tempted to go overboard,” she says.

Baranga has a number of ongoing and upcoming exhibitions scheduled, including at Munich’s størpunkt through October 31 and the Eretz Israel Museum in Tel-Aviv through 2021. The sumptuous artworks shown here will be on view at Beinart Gallery in Melbourne starting mid-October, and you can browse more of Baranga’s sculptures on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Interview: Artist Mohamad Hafez Explores How Multiple Identities Inform His Art and Why He Invests in Education

September 14, 2020

Laura Staugaitis

All images © Mohamad Hafez, shared with permission

Formerly a corporate architect, New Haven-based artist Mohamad Hafez (previously) builds intricate sculptures that evoke his home country of Syria. The miniature scenes feature gilded furniture, ornate motifs, and the architectural details of the Middle East, which the artist explores in a recent interview supported by Colossal Members.

If you’re raised and educated outside of the region, nobody is going to teach you about your cultural roots, that you come from something very precious and you should be proud and willing, at least, to rebuild and carry the baton. It goes along with my focus on education and rebuilding the generations. Education about that art and culture and architectural wealth is a main goal for me.

In a conversation with Colossal contributor Laura Staugaitis, Hafez reflects on his time at the upper echelon of luxury design and shares why working with young people is the key to building a better future.

 

 

 



Art

Okuda San Miguel Transforms a Stark Lighthouse in Spain into a Technicolor Beacon

September 11, 2020

Grace Ebert

“Infinite Cantabria” (2020, Spain. All images © Okuda San Miguel, by Beatriz Carretero and Omar H. Garcia, shared with permission

Situated along the coast in Cantabria, the Faro de Ajo has been transformed from a barren facade into a vivid display of more than 70 hues. The undertaking of artist Okuda San Miguel (previously), the 16-meter tower features a striped bird, wild animals rendered in bold blocks of color, and various dots and squiggles. Now bearing the name “Infinite Cantabria,” it is the first intervention on a Spanish lighthouse. “It has been a unique experience, both because of the artistic challenge that it has brought about for me, as well having carried this project out in my homeland,” says the artist, who is from the region in northern Spain.

Follow Okuda San Miguel on Instagram to check out more of his global projects, and pick up a face mask, puzzle, or print for a smaller dose of his technicolor interventions. (via TimeOut)

 

 

 



Art

Outfitted with Knights' Helmets, Children Painted by Seth Globepainter Play in the Streets of Paris

September 10, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Seth Globepainter, shared with permission

French artist Julien Malland, who works as Seth Globepainter (previously), is responding to the ongoing COVID-19 crisis with a new series of murals that capture the innocence of childhood. Painted throughout the thirteenth district of Paris, the public artworks feature kids in the midst of an imaginary adventure or playful activity: one rides an oversized pigeon, another blows multicolored bubbles, and a pair appears to float above the ground to embrace.

Each of the figures is sporting a metal knight’s helmet, a sign of protection for their physical wellbeing, in addition to a show of strength and resilience. In a note to Colossal, Globepainter says the headwear also refers to French President Emmanuel Macron’s speech in March in which he said, “We are at war,” as he ordered residents to stay home. The murals represent the way Parisians have accepted this new way of living and are about “how children, in particular, seem to have adapted easily to it,” the artist says. “They are protected by their helmets which weigh so heavily on them. They can only see through small openings in the metal, but they continue to play as if nothing had happened.”

To see more Globepainter’s public artworks that consider the world through the lens of childhood, follow him on Instagram.

 

 

 



Art

Using Naturally Dyed Cotton, Artist Sipho Mabona Explores Transformation through Origami

September 9, 2020

Grace Ebert

“A Unicorn’s Lower Jaw & Right Front Leg” (2020), indigo, old fustic, weld and iron on cotton and paper. All images © Sipho Mabona, shared with permission

Sipho Mabona (previously) folds, crimps, and puckers sheets of cotton to form geometric artworks. The artist dyes the porous material with natural substances like indigo and Maclura tinctoria (mulberry), which creates organic gradients and alters its texture. He then utilizes Origami creases to transform the cotton’s structure and shape, sometimes working in response to current affairs. For example, the red pieces (shown below) are a response to Black Lives Matter and “also of biographical significance to me having a father that was a politcal activist and refugee from South Africa.” he shares with Colossal.

While my earlier works have smooth monochromatic surfaces in my latest body of work I felt an urge to introduce a painterly gesture and an element of chance to counterbalance the stringent geometrical appearance of the crease-patterns… Both Origami and natural dyeing are techniques that have rarely been harnessed in fine arts that unlock an intriguing field of unexplored narratives.

Head to Instagram to dive further into Mabona’s folded cotton works.

 

“The Dragonflies’ Third Leg” (2019), Maclura tinctoria, on folded cotton and paper, 40 x 50 centimeters

Left: “Untitled” (2018), natural aizome, acrylic and molding paste on folded cotton, 132 x 108 centimeters. Right: “Untitled” (2018), natural aizome, acrylic and molding paste on folded cotton, 132 x 108 centimeters

“We Bled, We Are Bleeding, We Will Bleed”

“The Doves’ Wing” (2019), indigo and old fustic, on folded cotton and paper, 40 x 50 centimeters

Left: “The Cicadas’ Abdomen & Thorax” (2019), Madder on folded cotton. Right: “The Dove’s Wing & Shoulder (I1)” (2020), indigo-dyed, cotton, paper, Tyvek, wood, and nylon

“We Bled, We Are Bleeding, We Will Bleed”

Right: “Untitled” (2018), natural aizome, acrylic and molding paste on folded cotton, 132 x 108 centimeters

“We Bled, We Are Bleeding, We Will Bleed”

“Untitled” (2018), natural aizome on folded cotton and paper

 

 



Art

A Staggering Sculptural Rug by Artist Faig Ahmed Pours into an Amorphous Puddle

September 4, 2020

Grace Ebert

All images © Faig Ahmed, courtesy of Sapar Contemporary

Known for his sculptural textiles, Faig Ahmed fuses contemporary glitches and distortions with traditional weaving techniques. A recent artwork, titled “Doubts,” is one of his larger pieces that while conventionally shaped and patterned on top, appears to ooze out into a massive puddle. A stunning piece, the ornate motif blurs into swirls of color and an amorphous shape on the floor.

The Baku, Azerbaijan-based artist (previously) said in a statement that he began “Doubts” about one month prior to widespread lockdowns due to COVID-19.

Because of the quarantine, we had to close our textile studio several times and artwork on the loom was waiting for its time. A few days ago, after seven months, ‘Doubts?’ (was) cut off the loom. There are no more doubts in this carpet, destroying the geometric intelligible boundaries of the patterns—overflowing they geal on the floor—this is the limit of doubts.

To get an up-close look at the distorted carpet, check out the video below or head to Sapar Contemporary’s Instagram. Explore more of Ahmed’s fiber-based projects on Artsy.

 

 

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