Magnificent Cardboard Airships by Jeroen van Kesteren 

Over the last year, Netherlands-based artist Jeroen van Kesteren has been toiling away at these sculptural airships as part of a series titled Orphanage for Lost Adventures. Made primarily from cardboard, aluminum foil, adhesives, and an assortment of papers used for sails and propellers, the whimsical flying machines have a distinct steampunk feel. The pieces range from 40 to 50 centimeters tall and take about a month to make. Jeroen shares additional images of the airships and several additional sculptures on Pinterest. (via Colossal Submissions)

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The Grandeur of German Pipe Organs Photographed by Robert Götzfried 

Long fascinated by the design of pipe organs, photographer Robert Götzfried was recently permitted into 20 Catholic churches in southern Germany where he was able to create portraits of these mammoth instruments. When viewed singularly the pipe organ is impressive enough, but collectively the photos tell the story of an ancient instrument that varies so strikingly in design and layout that it’s hard to believe these are somehow the same musical device.

In his photographic practice Götzfried often approaches a variety of similar objects or locales both grand and obscure from Cambodian barber shops to bowling alleys or abandoned gas stations. Through each collection he quickly highlights the similarities or differences that bind a culture or lifestyle together. You can explore more of his photography on Facebook. (via Fubiz)

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Miniature Retro Papercraft Synthesizers by Dan McPharlin 

Produced between 2006 and 2009, Australian designer and illustrator Dan McPharlin's Analogue Miniatures are a marvel of papercraft. The tiny analogue synthesizers and pieces of recording equipment were pieced together with paper, framing mat board, string, rubber bands and cardboard, and appeared in everything from art shows to editorial spreads in magazines like Esquire. McPharlin is widely known for his retro sci-fi illustration work that appears on album covers and in limited edition prints, and he brings this aspect of fiction to these paper models as well. None of the objects are meant as exact replicas or recreations of real-life devices, but are instead speculative objects that draw aesthetic attributes from the audio technology of the 70s and 80s.

You can see many more pieces from Analogue Miniatures on Flickr. (via Strictly Paper)

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Flatland II: A New Series of Dramatically Skewed Photographic Landscapes by Aydin Büyüktas 

Turkish digital artist and photographer Aydin Büyüktas continues his dizzying landscape series Flatland with this new collection of collages shot in various locations around the United States including Texas, Arizona, New Mexico, and California. Each image requires around 18-20 aerial drone shots which are then stitched together digitally to form sweeping landscapes that curl upward without a visible horizon. As we’ve noted before, Büyüktas found inspiration in a century-old satirical novel titled Flatland about a two-dimensional world inhabited by geometric figures. You can see more from the series on his Facebook page.

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Unsettling Illustrations of Tangled Flora and Fauna Beings by Alex Kuno 

Minneapolis-based artist Alex Kuno imagines a world of twisted organic beings that borrow elements of plant life, anatomy, and the natural world. The artist admits that his illustrations are likely to creep some people out, but purposefully includes ideas that highlight life and growth, creating a dichotomy of revulsion and delight as the viewer carefully untangles each artwork. The mixed-media drawings are made primarily using ink, watercolor, graphite and chalk. You can see more of Kuno’s artwork on Instagram and limited edition prints are available in his shop. (via Booooooom)

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A Statue of a Defiant Girl Now Confronts the Famous ‘Charging Bull’ on Wall St. 

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If you happen to walk by the famous bronze Charging Bull statue in New York’s financial district today you’ll discover a fantastic new addition: a small girl in a defiant and unflinching pose now stands just feet away from the tip of the wild bull’s horns. The bronze sculpture was installed on Tuesday morning as part of a joint effort between State Street Global Advisors (a $2.5 trillion asset manager) and city officials just ahead of International Women’s Day. The artwork is part of a campaign to pressure companies to add more women to their boards, but will surely speak more broadly as symbol of women’s rights and empowerment within society as a whole.

Lori Heinel, the deputy global chief investment officer at State Street shares with Business Insider:

“One of the most iconic images on Wall Street is the charging bull. So the idea of having a female sort of stand against the bull or stand up to the bull just struck us as a very clever but also creative and engaging way to make that statement. Even though it’s a little girl, her stance is one of determination, forwardness, and being willing to challenge and take on the status quo.”

The statue, officially titled The Fearless Girl, was created by Delaware-based bronze sculptor Kristen Visbal and will remain for at least a month. The piece is already drawing large crowds and extensive coverage in the press. Charging Bull was originally an act of guerrilla art by Arturo Di Modica, and only became permanent after its soaring popularity, leaving some to wonder if Visbal’s statue could follow the same story. You can watch a video about its creation below.

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