Art

Danish Street Art Project Has Built Over 3,500 Urban Bird Houses Since 2006

November 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist and designer Thomas Dambo (previously) specializes in building family-friendly installations from upcycled materials. One of Dambo’s many interactive projects is Happy City Birds, a ongoing series that lies at the intersection of street art and community development. The Danish artist builds bird houses across urban centers, installing the new homes against buildings, grouped on tall poles, or spaced throughout existing trees.

Since 2006, Dambo and his crew have constructed more than 3,500 birdhouses with recycled wood and paint. Although a large percentage of his works are concentrated in Arken (you can see a Google map of the bird house locations here), many more of them can be found dotting Copenhagen, Aarhus, Odense, Horsens, Beirut, and Berlin. You can see more of Dambo’s bird houses, including this human-size build, and a collection of camoflauged homes, on Dambo’s website.

 

 



Animation History Photography

Surreal Animated Photos and Artworks by Nicolas Monterrat

November 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Illustrator and animator Nicolas Monterrat (previously) has brought his wild imagination to historical photographs and artworks that he sets in motion and shares on Ello. The short animations blend images borrowed from old catalogues, newspapers, and textbooks with snippets of abstract footage to create collage-like images that range from humorous to downright terrifying. You can follow more from the Paris-based artist on Tumblr. (via Cross Connect)

 

 



Art

New Porcelain Vessels Densely Layered in Leaf Sprigs and Other Botanical Forms by Hitomi Hosono

November 21, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Ceramicist Hitomi Hosono (previously) creates porcelain vessels layered in hundreds of leaf sprigs and other botanical forms. These monochromatic elements are based on plants Hosono encounters during walks through East London’s greenery. “It is my intention to transfer the leaf’s beauty and detail into my ceramic work,” she explains, using it as my own language to weave new stories for objects.”

Her technique is inspired by Jasperware, a type of stoneware covered in thin ceramic reliefs invented by Josiah Wedgwood in the late 18th century. Like Wedgwood, she carefully applies her delicate forms to a porcelain base. From start to finish a larger work will take Hosono nearly a year and a half to complete. Much of this time is spent drying, as her densely layered works often need 10-12 months to completely dry.

Hosono’s solo exhibition, Reimagining Nature: Hitomi Hosono’s Memories in Porcelain, is currently on view at the Daiwa Anglo-Japanese Foundation in London through December 15, 2017. You can see more of her layered botanical sculptures on the artist’s website and through her gallery Adrian Sassoon.

 

 



Art Design

Quirky Cartoon Toys and Vases Carved from Wood by Yen Jui-Lin

November 21, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Taiwanese artist Yen Jui-Lin carves delightful cartoon-like figures from wood that are almost guaranteed to bring a smile to your face. Some of the pieces function as flower vases or key hooks, while many of the objects are one-off toys that he gives to his children as gifts. You can see many more on Jui-Lin’s Facebook page. (via Lustik)

 

 



Design

LEGOs Snap Into Place in Hintlab’s Line of Playful Rings and Earrings

November 20, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Paris-based design duo Hintlab amplifies the nostalgia tied to Lego bricks by bringing the classic children’s toy to an older audience. Their line of earrings and rings are made to house small, interchangeable bricks, allowing their customers to customize their look depending on their mood or whim. Each piece of 3D-printed jewelry comes with a set of ten objects that can be either worn as a singular setting or stacked to create a multi-layer work.

Hintlab has also developed a line of jewelry that fits flush in its setting. The color and shape of the flat bricks still reflect the feeling of Lego, but are housed in a more minimal package. You can buy your own interchangeable set on the group’s Etsy, and see past designs on their Instagram. (via Designboom)

 

 



Art Photography

New Finnish Landscapes Captured Within Jars by Christoffer Relander

November 17, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Christoffer Relander (previously) uses double exposure photography to “capture” wooded Finnish landscapes inside of glass jars. These images give a peek into the photographer’s past, while also metaphorically preserving the memories he formed as a childhood growing up in the south of Finland.

“Reality can be beautiful, but the surreal often absorbs me,” said Relander in an artist statement on his website. “Photography to me is a way to express and stimulate my imagination. Nature is simply the world. With alternative and experimental camera techniques I am able to create artworks that otherwise only would be possible through painting or digital manipulation in an external software.”

The new series is a follow-up to his black and white project Jarred & Displaced which was recently exhibited at the Finnish Cultural Institute in Madrid. You can view more of Relander’s wooded images on his Instagram. (via PetaPixel)

 

 



Art

Bordalo II Opens the Doors to ‘Attero,’ a Giant Exhibition of Animal Assemblages Built with Trash

November 17, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Within the confines of an abandoned warehouse in Lisbon, artist Bordalo II just opened the doors to his largest body of work to date, dozens of animalistic assemblages comprised of his trademark medium: trash. Using locally-sourced waste plastics, car parts, construction materials, and other found detritus, Bordalo has become famous for his uncanny depictions of animals—those most vulnerable to the side effects of our disposable economy. While scale often plays a large role in his outdoor wall-mounted street pieces, the artist also created considerably smaller assemblages attached to old doors, siding, and windowpanes.

“Whether on a large or small scale, his unusual sculptural creations oblige us to question and rethink our own role as actors in this static, consumerist and self-destructive society, which exploits, often in an abusive way, the resources that nature offers us,” shares Attero curator Lara Seixo Rodrigues.

With well over 8,000 visitors in its first week, Attero (Latin for waste) opened on November 4, 2017 and runs through November 26. You can see many more photos on Facebook and Instagram.

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Animal Multi-Tool