Face of a Hummingbird Resembles a Baby Octopus 

As part of a fascinating courting behavior, this Costa’s hummingbird flares the feathers around its face to create a poof of iridescent pink that bears an uncanny resemblance to the shape of a cartoonish baby octopus. The near complete lack of interest from the female bird in this video is almost comical, there’s a metaphor here. (via Geyser of Awesome)


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New Behind-the-Scenes Images of Irma Gruenholz’s Clay Portraits and Illustrations 


Madrid-based graphic designer and illustrator Irma Gruenholz (previously here and here), crafts her illustrations out of clay, turning the typically 2D medium on its head by creating brightly dressed figures in 3D environments. Gruenholz meticulously places and photographs each of the works, placing them in books, posters and advertisements. The artist is generous about letting her audience witness her process, snapping step-by-step images that outline actions such as making tiny sandals and arranging the hairs on a mermaid’s head.

This year, Gruenholz was shortlisted for the World Illustration Awards in London, and work is also included in the recent book “Alchemy: The Art and Craft of Illustration” now available in the Colossal Shop. You explore more of her ceramic illustration work on Behance and her website.








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Classic American Ephemera Recreated in Clay by Artist Kristen Morgin 


“Monopoly” (2007) (Collection Kristen L. Morgin, image courtesy of the artist and Marc Selwyn Fine Art, Beverly Hills)

Kristen Morgin creates objects that at first seem forgettable. Each piece shows evidence of wear, containing the rust and rips of things that have ceased to be cared for long ago. Despite their appearance of cardboard, tin, and paper, the works, which reflect American culture’s ephemera, are actually created entirely from unfired clay. The records, VHS sleeves, board games, and figurines are all illusions, recreations of mementos lost to time.

Morgin keeps her pieces unfired to retain the natural texture and look of the clay, a material that changes drastically once altered by fire. Like the objects that they imitate, her sculptures are meant to eventually crumble, possibly holding an even shorter lifespan than what they resemble. The content of these works focuses on fantasy versus reality, highlighting celebrity and beauty that has long past, created by a material that is not what it seems.

Morgin’s work is included in the four-artist exhibition “Visions and Revisions: Renwick Invitational 2016” at the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s Renwick Gallery in Washington, D.C. through January 8, 2017. (via Smithsonian Mag)

"Sorryland" (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink and marker, 28 x 20 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches (image courtesy of <a href="http://www.anthonymeierfinearts.com/artists/kristen-morgin/slideshow?view=slider#7" target="_blank">Anthony Meier Fine Arts</a>)

“Sorryland” (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink and marker, 28 x 20 1/2 x 3 3/4 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)


“The Repeating Table” (2010), wood, books, toys, records with clay painted counterparts, 45 x 68 x 108 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)


“150 Ways to Play Solitaire” (2010), wood, wire and unfired painted clay, 34 x 34 x 12 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

"Still Life As The Alphabet" (2013), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, wood, 5.5 x 37 x 2 in

“Still Life As The Alphabet” (2013), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, wood, 5.5 x 37 x 2 in (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)

"Still Life As A Conga Line" (detail), (2014), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, 18 x 96 inches

“Still Life As A Conga Line” (detail), (2014), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite, 18 x 96 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)


“Ecstasy Pyramid” (2016), unfired clay, paint, ink, marker, crayon and graphite, 38 x 37 x 2 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)


“Another Wonderful Day” (2013), unfired clay, pint, ink, crayon, graphite, 12.25 x 12.25 x 0.25 inches (image courtesy of Zach Feuer)


“Space Invader” (2012), unfired clay, paint, ink, graphite and wire, 13 3/4 x 16 1/2 x 1/4 inches (image courtesy of Anthony Meier Fine Arts)

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Ingenious Hack for Sketching with Two Point Perspective Using an Elastic String 


This quick video demonstrates how to use a long elastic string anchored at the horizon of a canvas to sketch a drawing with two point perspective. With as many art and drawing classes I’ve taken, I’ve never seen this method used before. A more traditional and accurate method would involve a ruler and maybe a drafting table if you’re super fancy, but this seems like a great method for mocking up something quickly. The video posted on Facebook is uncredited and apparently came from Instagram. Anyone know the artist/designer? (via Reddit, The Awesomer)

A video posted by reza asgaripour (@architectdrw) on

Update: The individual demonstrating this technique is architect Reza Asgaripour.

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Can Design Enrich Human Experience? Discover Innovative Graduate Programs at Parsons (Sponsor) 


Students at Parsons School of Design challenge convention to explore design from a human-centered perspective. They explore, disrupt, and experiment, drawing on all disciplines to design for a world that doesn’t exist yet.

Here are four highlights from the 17 master’s programs offered at Parsons:

Communication Design (MPS): Relay information and ideas in an increasingly digital landscape. Graduate with technical knowhow and leadership skills that set you apart in the professional world.

Design and Urban Ecologies (MS): Reinvigorate urban environments alongside the communities that live there. Create policies to transform community organizing, public space, housing, infrastructure, and more.

Design Studies (MA): Explore the influence of design on the past, present, and future. Study through a unique, multidisciplinary approach, discovering ways that design can affect social change.

Lighting Design (MFA): Study the intellectual, aesthetic, and technical dimensions of light, and discover its social impact. Combine with a Architecture or Interior Design degree.

Now Accepting Applications for Fall  2017.

New Detailed Colored Pencil Drawings of Entangled Flora and Fauna by Marco Mazzoni 


Marco Mazzoni (previously here and here) creates works that at first lead the viewer astray, appearing as bouquets or nests until one notices fins protruding from the flora that sprawls across his Moleskine sketchbooks. Some works concentrate on small groups of animals while others serve as finely drawn “I Spy” collages, as he incorporates camouflaged toads and birds into lush, textured gardens.

Colored pencil is the Italian artist’s medium of choice, cool pastels of purple, blue and pink forming most of his paused still lifes. Recently Mazzoni produced a series titled “Illustrated Encyclopedia of Mental Diseases,” illustrations which were included in the group exhibition “Cluster” at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York City this August. You can view more of the artist’s odd animal clusters on his Instagram, Facebook, and Tumblr.








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