Ethereal Sculptures and Wearable Orbs Formed From Synthetic Fabric by Mariko Kusumoto 

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All images provided by Mariko Kusumoto

Japanese artist Mariko Kusumoto uses translucent fabric to produce balloon-like objects, orbs that contain various forms trapped within their soft exterior. The creations inside range from smaller versions of the spherical sculptures to sea creatures and cars, playful forms that fit the bright colors Kusumoto chooses for her works. To set the polyester fabric into the shapes she desires she heats the pieces to the right temperature, allowing the material to memorize the shape she wishes to create. These works are then formed into sculptural or wearable objects, 3D jewelry that can be worn around the neck.

“My work reflects various, observable phenomena that stimulate my mind and senses; they can be natural or man-made,” said Kusumoto in her artist statement. ” I ‘reorganize’ them into a new presentation that can be described as surreal, amusing, graceful, or unexpected.”

The Massachusetts-based artist’s work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Fine Arts Boston, The Kock Collection at the Swiss National Museum, Racine Art Museum, and Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens and is represented by Mobilia Gallery in Cambridge, MA. You can see more of her sculptural and wearable works on her Facebook.

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PolyWood: Toy Animal Concepts Rendered in Polygons by Mat Szulik 

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Sometimes it seems long gone are the days of kids sitting down and playing with simple wooden toys, trading tactile objects for screens and buttons. Freelance illustrator and 3D artist artist Mat Szulik straddles the two worlds of digital and physical in this fantastic series of conceptual wood toys based on digital polygons. Titled PolyWood v1.0, the series of 8 creatures are all digital, using wood textures mapped to Szulik’s geometric illustrations. I can’t imagine how something like this could be produced or carved from actual wood, but they’re lovely to look at regardless. (via Behance)

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Surreal Monochromatic GIFs by Carl Burton 

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Digital artist and animator Carl Burton creates quick atmospheric GIFs that blend elements of science fiction and surrealism. Glittering illuminated tentacles appear to twist through the dark while neon lasers emerge from deep pools of water. Much of what you see here represents Burton’s personal experiments, but the NYC-based creative also lends his illustrative style to images for long-form publications around the web. He works primarily with Cinema 4D, Photoshop, and After Effects, spending several hours or even days on a single GIF depending on its complexity. You can see more of his work on Tumblr. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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Minimalistic One Line Tattoos By Mo Gangi 

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All images via Mo Ganji

Berlin-based Mo Ganji produces tattoos that utilize a single line, black images with little more detail than a couple of dots to offset his swirling strokes. The images are all figural, yet range from elephants and koi fish to more gestural images of half-drawn faces. Each work is breathtaking in its simplicity, stark images that relate to the artist’s own views of mastering a simple and honest life. To check out more of Ganji’s work, head over to his Instagram. (via Coudal)

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New Embroidered Works on Rackets, Shoes, and Fences by Danielle Clough 

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All images provided by Danielle Clough

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Embroidering rackets rather than swinging them, Danielle Clough (previously) uses thick thread to create multi-colored images of aloe and other fauna on vintage tennis rackets, the strings acting as her loom. Recently the Cape Town-based artist and designer was commissioned by Vans to embroider four pairs of shoes—a task that lead to kicks decorated with kiwis and pears, Pussy Riot, and a rat seen below.

Clough has also begun to embroider on fences, taking her craft to public arenas such as this years Upfest where she will be completing her first public street art embroidery. You can see more detailed images of her work on her Instagram, and a behind the scenes look at her process on her blog.

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