Tiffanie Turner’s Debut Book Shows How To Create Her Masterful Paper Flowers 

All images courtesy of Tiffanie Turner and Watson-Guptill, an imprint of Penguin Random House LLC. Photography copyright Aya Brackett.

We’ve long admired the breathtaking botanical artwork crafted by San Francisco-based artist Tiffanie Turner (previously here and here). Combining her architectural training with a love of the natural world, Turner has pioneered a seemingly infinite number of techniques to craft incredibly lifelike flowers from everyday materials. And, after years of refining her unique art form, her debut book The Fine Art of Paper Flowers will be published on August 22nd.

In her comprehensive photo-filled 254-page book, Turner starts from the ground up, detailing materials and basic techniques, doling out dye recipes, and offering species-specific construction guides for leaves, stems, and buds. Finished projects range from delicate cosmos to peonies the size of a fully-grown person, and include options for personal accessories like everlasting boutonnieres and flower crowns that channel Frida Kahlo. Turner generously shares every aspect of her years of acquired knowledge in her friendly voice, with step-by-step instructions that read somewhere between a cookbook and a novel. The Fine Art of Paper Flowers is currently available for pre-order in The Colossal Shop.

And, if you live in the Chicago area or would like to visit our fair city, we are thrilled to be hosting Tiffanie for two workshops and a book signing on September 26th. Tiffanie will be teaching how to make Cosmos or Double Bomb Peonies (or both!) in an intimate workshop setting held at Colossal’s HQ. There will also be a free book signing, where copies of Tiffanie’s book will be available for purchase. Tickets and info for the workshops can be found in The Colossal Shop.

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A Gigantic Buddha Statue Emerges from the Top of a Hill in Japan 

Unless otherwise noted, all photographs by Shigeo Ogawa.

Normally a cemetery wouldn’t be on our list of recommended sites to see, but the Makomanai Cemetery is one of the most awe-inspiring places we’ve ever been. Located in the outskirts of Sapporo, a large stone Buddha occupies the sprawling landscape. All 1,500 tons of it has sat alone there for 15 years. But when the cemetery decided they wanted to do something to increase visitor’s appreciations for the Buddha, they enlisted architect Tadao Ando, who had a grand and bold idea: hide the statue.

Photo by Hiroo Namiki.

“Our idea was to cover the Buddha below the head with a hill of lavender plants,” said Ando. Indeed, as you approach “Hill of Buddha” the subject is largely concealed by a hill planted with 150,000 lavenders. Only the top of the statue’s head pokes out from the rotunda, creating a visual connection between the lavender plants and the ringlets of hair on the Buddha statue’s head.

Upon entering, visitors are forced to turn left or right and walk around a rectangular lake of water before entering the 131-ft (40-meter) long approach tunnel. The journey is a constant reminder of the weather, the breeze and the light, and is works in tandem to heighten anticipation of the statue, which is only visible once you reach the end of the tunnel.

Any time of the year, visitors will have a different experience. The 150,000 lavenders “turn fresh green in spring, pale purple in summer and silky white with snow in winter.” It really is a miraculous work of environmental art. (Syndicated from Spoon & Tamago)

Photo by Hiroo Namiki.

Photo by Hiroo Namiki.

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Miniature Scenes Set Amongst Office Supplies by Derrick Lin 

Photographer Derrick Lin captures the minutiae of everyday office life across landscapes of notebooks, paper clips, and coffee mugs populated with tiny figures. Working only with his iPhone, desk lighting, and a broad array of miniatures, Lin creates visual commentary on office life as well as recreations of popular artworks or scenes of escape. Many of his photos have been collected into an upcoming book titled Work, Figuratively Speaking: The Big Setbacks and Little Victories of Office Life, published this fall through Universe. See more on Instagram. (via Creators Project)

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A Village Encapsulated Inside a 5-Story Robot’s Head and Other Recent Murals by ‘Phlegm’ 

This past month, Sheffield-based artist Phlegm (previously) revealed his latest mural, a 5-story tall robot on Chapel Street in Melbourne, Australia. The mechanical monster hides a village, or maybe an entire world, beneath its metal scalp, which it reveals while simultaneously dangling a lantern over the homes below. To create the work, Phlegm worked with the building’s mechanics, repurposing a flashing carpark light near the structure’s third floor into a beating heart for his large-scale visitor. You can see more of the muralist’s black and white illustrative pieces from the last year in Manchester, Florida, Oslo, and Toronto, as well as a time-lapse video of his Melbourne-based robot mural, below.

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Insect Flower Arrangements by Raku Inoue 

For a new series titled Natura Insects, Montreal-based creative Raku Inoue arranged a variety of leaves and blooms to create the delicate components of stag beetles, butterflies, and other insects. While the same results could be easily produced using digital or collage techniques, Inoue pushed the concept even further and used real flowers which he then photographed as you see here. You can see more from the series on Instagram. (via Abudeezo)

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Household Objects Overgrown With Sprouted Wooden Limbs by Camille Kachani 

Lebanese-Brazilian artist Camille Kachani creates humorous wooden sculptures that directly reference their origin, weaving root systems into household objects like chairs and shelves, while sprouting leafy plants from the handles of hammers and hedge clippers. Due to their overgrown state, the sculptures he builds are rendered unusable, almost as if their original material is attempting to reclaim the carved form. Garden tools like a shovel and a hoe appear to come alive, fake leaves covering the branches that have forked from their wooden base.

You can see more of Kachani’s works through Sao Paulo’s Zipper Galeria where he is currently represented.

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