Art Illustration

Ethereal Acrylic Paintings by Duy Huynh Explore Cultural Displacement and Elements of Folklore

November 2, 2017

Christopher Jobson

North Carolina-based painter Duy Huynh (previously) infuses his acrylic paintings with whimsical elements of visual storytelling, where a plume of instruments rises from a rushing locomotive and the moon hovers as a balloon tethered to the wrist of a woman. Huynh arrived in the U.S. from Vietnam in the 1980s and often revisits this period of cultural acclimatization in his artwork. Via his artist statement:

Themes of geographical and cultural displacement are prevalent in Duy’s artwork. Ethereal characters maintain a serene, precarious balance, often in a surreal or dreamlike setting. With his figures, Duy explores motion along with emotion in order to portray not just the beauty of the human form, but also the triumph of the human spirit.

Huynh is the co-owner of Lark & Key Gallery and many of his original works and prints are currently available.

 

 



Design

LA Architects and Designers Build Imaginative Outdoor Cat Dwellings for Charity

November 1, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Architects for Animals celebrated its 10th edition last month, inviting local architects and designers to build functional cat dwellings in response to the city’s homeless cat population. The homes were auctioned off to benefit LA-based non-profit FixNation, a charity organization that provides free spay/neuter services to stray, abandoned, and feral cats. Designs ranged from a modern kitty disco to a roller-coaster like structure, each placing a creative twist on feline shelters with a variety of different cat-safe materials.

More designs from previous Architects for Animals can be found on their website. (via Design Milk)

 

 



Art Photography

Museum Patrons Accidentally Matching Artworks Photographed by Stefan Draschan

November 1, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Stefan Draschan visits museums around Europe to see not just the artwork but the people observing the artwork. In his series People Matching Artworks he patiently waits for museum-goers who unintentionally coordinate with the art they’re observing, and snaps a candid photo of the coincidence. You can follow the tumblr for this project, as well as a behind-the-scenes tumblr, and find links to Draschan’s other observational collections on his website. (via Kottke)

 

 



Colossal

The New Face of Colossal

November 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Colossal Home Page

If you noticed things are a little different around here lately, you’re right—after nearly a year of work we’re extremely excited to announce that Colossal finally has a new look! The design represents the most dramatic facelift in our 7-year history and our first true redesign in over 4 years. The design brings our underlying technology and infrastructure up to speed, making things a bit more accessible on mobile devices, improving access to our massive archive of over 5,000 articles, and introducing a few subtle new features. We have a handful of tweaks left here and there, but otherwise we’re thrilled with the result and hope you enjoy it, too.

We would like to thank the incomparable Armin Vit from UnderConsideration who helmed the entire process. Vit also published the design-oriented Quipsologies blog that coincidentally ceased publishing last month. Over the years Colossal sourced dozens of stories from Quipsologies and the web will be a bit lonelier without it.

Since our inception in 2010, Colossal has embraced the idea that our identity is intertwined with the artists, designers, and stories we publish. In years past the site reflected this through various banners and collages created by numerous artists. For this latest iteration, we collaborated with Vit to incorporate this idea through the form of a logo ‘window’. Every few months we’ll rotate images of work we enjoy and update the credits on our About page. Thanks to Hari & Deepti, Meow Wolf, Daniel Mullen, Warren Keelan, and Kilian Schönberger for helping kick things off.

A big shout out to Lui Ferreyra for our fancy new bio portraits. And lastly a hat tip to our generous web host Media Temple and their CloudTech staff who have kept things humming smoothly behind the scenes here for years.

 

 



Art Photography

Artist Yang Yongliang Imagines the Bleak Effects of Industrialization in Dense Photographic Collages

November 1, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yang Yongliang, Endless Streams, 2017. Single Channel 4K video, 7’00”, © Yang Yongliang / Courtesy Galerie Paris-Beijing

In these stark photographic collages that seem to possess the infinite density of a fractal, artist Yang Yongliang (previously) questions unchecked industrialization, the impact of climate change, and pressing social issues in his native China. Each image seems to suggest a post-apocalyptic future where the forces of urbanization collide with the natural world, creating a drab black and white dystopia. “The artist keeps developing a critic approach to reality while searching for a spiritual source in his country’s relentless march between technological progress and annihilation,” states Galerie Paris-Beijing.

As part of this new series titled Time Immemorial, Yongliang began with a series of digital collages that were printed in negative on fine art paper. Each piece was then photographed with a traditional film camera and prints were developed by hand. Lastly, the artworks are mounted on back-lit wooden cases to fulfill the artist’s intent to preserve digital imagery on photographic film.

Time Immemorial opens at Galerie Paris-Beijing on November 4, 2017.

Sinking, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

Flooding, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

The Cliff, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Path, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 80 cm

The Streams, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 100 x 80 cm

The Flock, 2016. Giclee print on Fine Art paper, 80 x 100 cm

 

 



Art

Brittle Skeletons Crocheted from Discarded Textiles by Caitlin McCormack

October 31, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Philadelphia-based artist Caitlin McCormack (previously) continues to explore the decay and remains of once-living things in her intricate crochet work. McCormick constructs her pieces using a labor intensive process that involves stiffening discarded textile materials with enamel paint to create brittle bone-like material. She then crochets fantastical intertwined skeletons of humans, birds, snakes, devils, and two-headed bats, which are displayed with stark black backdrops, glass cases, and lathed bases that reference old-fashioned displays for scientific specimens.

Her new show, Lazarus Taxa, refers to the paleontological concept of species that disappear and reappear in the fossil record. Lazarus Taxa is currently on display at Paradigm Gallery + Studio. You can also follow her on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Chandeliers Constructed From Recycled Plastic PET Bottles by Veronika Richterová

October 30, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Czech artist Veronika Richterová (previously) uses the near indestructible nature of plastic PET bottles to her advantage. By snipping, twisting, and heating the drinking vessels, she forms long-lasting sculptures that visually mirror the qualities of glass. This similarity inspired her series of PET luminaries, a project composed of fully functioning light systems in the form of chandeliers and lamps.

The included works are decorated with tulip-shaped light bulb covers, scalloped edges, and long, twisted segments of recycled bottles that imitate electrical cords. In order to protect these heat-sensitive sculptures, Richterová installs her works with bulbs and cables that produce minimal heat.

A few of Richterová’s plastic chandeliers are currently included in the 50-artist exhibition Eden Unearthed at Sydney’s Eden Gardens through February 2018. You can see more recycled works in the form of cacti, animals, and more on the artist’s website. (via Lustik)