Art

Lifelike Sculpted Figures and Immersive Monochrome Environments by Hans Op de Beeck

March 28, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

Belgian artist Hans Op de Beeck creates life-size figural sculptures and immersive environments from materials such as coated wood, polyester, and pigmented plaster. These chosen materials turn his constructed figures and installations into a uniform shade of matte gray, which makes the viewer feel as if the world around them has been zapped of color.

In his 2016 work The Collector’s House, Op de Beeck produced a 2,600-square-foot monochrome space in which visitors served as the only element of color. The museum-like installation contained several life-size sculpted figures in addition to a library, grand piano, furniture, scattered still lifes, and a lily pool positioned squarely at the work’s center. This work, like many in his practice aimed to stimulate the viewer’s senses and to “create a form of visual fiction that delivers a moment of wonder, silence and introspection,” he explained in an artist statement.

Op de Beeck currently works in both Brussels and Gooik, Belgium. Over the last decade, Op de Beeck has mounted institution-based solo exhibitions at museums across the US and Europe, including the Smithsonian’s Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden (2010), MOCA Cleveland (2014), and Kunstmuseum Wolfsburg (2017). You can view more of his lifelike figures and installations on his website.

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector's House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

The Collector’s House, sculptural installation, 2016. Coated wood, coated polyester, pigmented plaster, PU, metal, glass, 20 × 12.5 × 4 m

Tatiana (Soap Bubble), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Tatiana (Soap Bubble), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Sleeping Girl, sculpture, 2017. Mixed Media

Sleeping Girl, sculpture, 2017. Mixed Media

Brian, sculpture, 2018. Polyester, glass, coating

Brian, sculpture, 2018. Polyester, glass, coating

Tatiana (Butterfly), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

Tatiana (Butterfly), sculpture, 2017. Polyester, wood, polyamide

The Garden Room, sculptural installation, 2017

The Garden Room, sculptural installation, 2017

 

 



Design

Artopia: A 3D Painting App That Lets You Create Artworks for Others to Discover in Augmented Reality

March 28, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Kuwaiti game developer Omar Khalil is in the process of building an augmented reality and location-based app called Artopia, which allows users to create and save 3D paintings out in the world. Others can then encounter the paintings, which are timestamped and show the username of the creator. Khalil began working on the project as a computer science student at American University of Kuwait. As Artopia nears completion, Khalil is looking for beta testers. If you’d like to give feedback, you can sign up on Artopia’s website.

 

 



Craft

Poseable Miniature Birds Designed by Katie Doka

March 28, 2018

Christopher Jobson

Copenhagen-based miniature artist Katie Doka fabricates exquisitely detailed miniature birds that perch atop the ends of pencils and paintbrushes. The feathery specimens are built primarily from polymer clays, glass, jewelry wire and lambs wool or cotton with accents of acrylic paint. Although the pieces are designed primarily for use in dollhouses, their adjustable frames and appendages ensure each bird can adapt to any environment. You can see more on Instagram and in her Etsy shop. (via So Super Awesome)

 

 



Sponsor

UGEARS Launches 12 New Mechanical Models (Sponsor)

March 27, 2018

Colossal

UGEARS continues to reveal the mystery of mechanics with twelve new mechanical models available exclusively on Kickstarter. Some designs are inspired by real-life prototypes, while others are original re-imaginings of historical mechanisms and the creatures from your wishlist.

All UGEARS models are made of sustainably sourced wood and are powered by rubber bands, gears, cranks, and gravity. No glue or batteries are required; simply follow the detailed step-by-step illustrated manual with instructions in 11 languages to complete your model.

The Horse-Mechanoid, the Tower Windmill, Aviator, V-Express Steam Train with Tender, a Secret model, the Archballista-Tower, the Stagecoach, the Roadster, the Bike, the Heavy Boy Long-Hauler with Trailer, and Flexi-Cubus will be your companions on an exciting mechanical journey through history.

The UGEARS team is continuously working on fascinating new self-propelled wooden models. With your support, UGEARS can develop more new DIY models all over the world.

Whether you’re a hobbyist, looking for an original gift idea, or are simply curious, UGEARS mechanical models provide hours of fun and the joy of creating. The UGEARS mission is to give an unforgettable time of working together on things that are popular for all ages.

This post was sponsored by UGEARS.

 

 



Art

A Madrid Plaza Transformed Into a Temporary Park With Over 35,000 Square Feet of Grass

March 27, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For the 400th anniversary of Madrid’s Plaza Mayor, urban artist SpY (previously) transformed the bustling square into a centralized place of respite. The temporary park titled Cesped, or “Grass,” was created by bringing in more than 35,000 square feet of sod, which formed a perfect green circle at the center of the pedestrian plaza. Over the course of its four day installation last fall more than 100,000 visitors lounged, played, and rested in the celebratory work.

You can watch a time-lapse installation of the project on the Madrid-based artist’s website, and view more urban interventions on his Instagram.  (via designboom)

 

 



Photography

A New Infrared View of the Dolomites by Paolo Pettigiani Shows Craggy Landscapes in Cotton Candy Colors

March 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

26-year old photographer Paolo Pettigiani (previously) has been taking pictures since age 11, and in the last few years has produced several series of eye-popping infrared images. Pettigiani’s most recent work showcases the Dolomites, a craggy mountain range in the northeastern region of his native Italy.

Infrared photography uses a special film or light sensor that processes the usually not-visible wavelengths of infrared light (specifically near-infrared, as opposed to far-infrared, which is used in thermal imaging.) The resulting images from Pettigiani depict the stands of coniferous trees as watermelon-pink, while surfaces that don’t reflect IR light stay more true to their nature hues. You can see more of the artist’s photographs on his website, as well as on Behance and Instagram. Pettigiani also offers prints of his work via Lumas.

 

 



Art

New Architectural Sculptures by David Moreno Appear As Three Dimensional Drawings

March 26, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Spanish sculptor David Moreno (previously) continues to blur the lines between two and three dimensions with his architectural artworks. Created using hundreds of steel rods and lengths of piano wire, Moreno’s sculptures take the shape of buildings, and his more recent works have ventured indoors, highlighting interior details like doorways and staircases. In 2017, the artist also created a large, immersive installation in the United Arab Emirates titled “Connecting Doors.”  Moreno shares his work on Instagram and Behance.