Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett

Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett drawing architecture

Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett drawing architecture

Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett drawing architecture

Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett drawing architecture

Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett drawing architecture

Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett drawing architecture

Labyrinthine Drawings of Interconnected Rooms by Mathew Borrett drawing architecture

For this spectacularly detailed series of architecturally influenced drawings, Toronto-based artist Mathew Borrett labored with 005 Pigma Micron pens to create networks of compartmentalized dwellings that appear to be carved into the face of a cliff or dug into the ground with isometric perfection. Titled Room Series, the drawings were created in 2003, and Borrett continues to explore imaginary landscapes that appear gently influenced by science fiction and fantasy. You can see more of his work in his website and he has prints available on Fine Art America. Borrett also has a self-published book spanning the last decade. (via Artist a Day)

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing Airy Dresses Carved From Marble by Alasdair Thomson sculpture marble fashion clothing

These lightweight, airy dresses look like they’re about to be adorned to a fancy gala or dinner party. But as irony would have it, they will never be worn. In fact, the dresses are actually made from Carrera Marble, the same material as the world’s most famous naked statue – Michelangelo’s David. Starting out as a solid mass of marble that can weigh several tons, they are chiseled and sculpted down by Alasdair Thomson, a sculptor living and working in Edinburgh, Scotland.

His latest work, “The Identity Collection,” (named as if it’s a fashion line) explores “the way fabric hangs and folds, and is attempting to capture that lightness and gracefulness in stone.” Effectively ceding control over his subjects, Alasdair asked his friends and family to donate garments, which he then impeccably recreated out of marble. You can see more of Alasdair’s work on his website or his Instagram account.

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs ocean nature macro

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs ocean nature macro

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs ocean nature macro

Created by University of Queensland PhD student Daniel Stoupin, this remarkable macro video of coral reefs, sponges and other underwater wildlife, brings a fragile and rarely-seen world into vivid focus. Stoupin shot some 150,000 photographs which he edited down to create the final clip. He shares about the endeavor:

Time lapse cinematography reveals a whole different world full of hypnotic motion and my idea was to make coral reef life more spectacular and thus closer to our awareness. I had a bigger picture in my mind for my clip. But after many months of processing hundreds of thousands of photos and trying to capture various elements of coral and sponge behavior I realized that I have to take it one step at a time. For now, the clip just focuses on beauty of microscopic reef “landscapes.” The close-up patterns and colors of this type of fauna hardly resemble anything from the terrestrial environments. Corals become even less familiar if you consider their daily “activities.”

Stoupin discusses Slow Life as well as the threats to the Great Barrier Reef that inspired him to make the video in a detailed entry over on his blog. (via Kottke)

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

Street Eraser: Giant Stickers Appear to Erase the Streets of London with Photoshop street art stickers photoshop London erasers

For their Street Eraser project artists Tayfun Sarier and Guus ter Beek (who both work at Wieden+Kennedy) created giant adhesive stickers that look like the eraser tool in Photoshop. Once applied to advertisements, graffiti and other objects it appears as if the surface is being erased, revealing Photoshop’s checkerboard background signifying a blank canvas. Fun! (via Designboom)

DreamWorks Special Effects Artist Transforms His Son into a Superhero

DreamWorks Special Effects Artist Transforms His Son into a Superhero superheroes kids humor

Just when you think you’ve mastered every filter and editing technique when making a video of your kid chewing on Legos and pulling the cat’s tail, DreamWorks special effects artist Daniel Hashimoto arrives to trump us all. On his YouTube channel Action Movie Kid Hashmito bestows his son James with superhuman abilities and gives him gadgets of every child’s wildest imagination. Here are five of my favorites but you can see more here. (thnx, Jess!)

Anatomical 3D Self-Portrait by Joshua Harker

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Chicago-based artist Joshua Harker recently unveiled this 3D-printed sculptural self-portrait titled 21st Century Self-Portrait. Harker utilized a 3D scan of his face and a CT scan of his skull to form the components which were coupled with his trademark filigree aesthetic found in some of his other artworks (you might remember his Crania Anatomica Filigre project a while back, a piece now in his shop). 21st Century Self-Portrait was first shown at 3D Printshow in New York back in February. If you’re interested, Harker is now making custom printed masks based on your own 3D facial scan. (via Street Anatomy, Laughing Squid)

The World’s Smallest Sandcastles Built on Individual Grains of Sand by Vik Muniz and Marcelo Coelho

The Worlds Smallest Sandcastles Built on Individual Grains of Sand by Vik Muniz and Marcelo Coelho sand etching

The Worlds Smallest Sandcastles Built on Individual Grains of Sand by Vik Muniz and Marcelo Coelho sand etching

The Worlds Smallest Sandcastles Built on Individual Grains of Sand by Vik Muniz and Marcelo Coelho sand etching

The Worlds Smallest Sandcastles Built on Individual Grains of Sand by Vik Muniz and Marcelo Coelho sand etching

Artist Vik Muniz (previously here, here, and here) is known for his gigantic composite installations and sculptures created from thousands of individual objects. In this new collaboration with artist and MIT researcher Marcelo Coelho, Muniz takes the opposite approach and explores the microscopic with a new series of sandcastles etched onto individual grains of sand.

The process of getting a sandcastle onto a speck of rock was anything but straightforward and involved over four years of trial and error utilizing both antiquated and highly technical methods. Muniz first drew each castle using a camera lucida, a 19th century optical tool that relies on a prism to project a reflection of whatever is in front of you onto paper where it can be traced. The drawings were then sent to Coelho who worked with a number of microscopic drawing processes for several years before deciding to use a Focused Ion Beam (FIB) which has the capability of creating a line only 50 nanometers wide (a human hair is about 50,000 nanometers wide).

Lastly, Muniz photographed the final etchings and enlarged them to wall-sized prints. He shared with the Creator’s Project: “When someone tells you it’s a grain of sand, there’s a moment where your reality falls apart and you have to reconstruct it. You have to step back and ask what the image is and what it means,” a fascinating play on scale and perception. Watch the new video above from the Creator’s Project to see how the project came together.

The sandcastles are on view starting today as part of a comprehensive exhibition of Muniz’ work spanning the last 25 years at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. (via The Creator’s Project)

Time-lapse Scenes of Swarming Fireflies by Vincent Brady

Time lapse Scenes of Swarming Fireflies by Vincent Brady timelapse nature insects fireflies

Time lapse Scenes of Swarming Fireflies by Vincent Brady timelapse nature insects fireflies

This is a fantastic feat of photography and editing by Vincent Brady who shot this montage of firefly timelapses in 2013 at Lake of the Ozarks, Missouri and around his home in Grand Ledge, Michigan. To make the timelapse Brady had to master several different cameras, learn about photo stacking, 360° panoramas, and even how to pilot a pontoon boat to get all the requisite shots. While we’ve seen several articles here on Colossal featuring long-exposure fireflies it’s still fascinating to see them in motion like this. You can read about Brady’s adventures on his website, and learn more about the science of fireflies on It’s Okay To Be Smart. (via It’s Okay To Be Smart)

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