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Hypnotizing New Concentric Ceramic Vessels by Matthew Chambers


Usually people describe staring at a spinning pottery wheel as being somewhat hypnotizing, not staring at ceramic artworks themselves. But such is the case with these uncanny pieces by Matthew Chambers (previously) who continues to push the limits of his concentric stoneware vessels. Every visible layer in his sculptures is individually crafted on a wheel before Chambers assembles them, with a single piece containing dozens of objects. The artist experiments with color, scale, and the patterns by which each piece is internally situated to form colorful gradients or suggest motion across a sequences of sculptures.

Seen here is a collection of more recent work and you can see much more on Mouvements Mordernes and Puls Ceramics. Chambers will also have new pieces on view at the Campden Gallery in Gloucestershire starting October 10th.












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Flight of the Baji: A Pod of Suspended Driftwood Dolphin Skeletons Flies through the Baltimore Museum of Art


This immersive site-specific installation by artist Jonathan Latiano (previously) depicts the fate of China’s famous Baji dolphins rendered in driftwood flying through a gallery at the Baltimore Museum of Art. To create the immersive installation Latiano collected bleached and mangled wood from local rivers which he used to form a procession of skeletons. The bony structures materialize from a stack of logs in one corner before gradually dissolving back into component pieces in the other.

Freshwater Baji dolphins (dubbed the “Goddess of the Yangtze”) were once a thriving part of the Yangtze River ecosystem in China, but are now largely assumed to be extinct. The last known member of the species died in captivity back in 2002.

Latiano shares about his work via his artist statement:

The pieces that I create contrast abstracted human intuition with the reality of our natural environment. I strive to emphasize the areas that exist in‐between the boundaries of defined regions. My work, in many ways, is my own personal attempt to understand my place in the physical universe. I find the poeticism and concepts of the natural universe simultaneously fascinating, beautiful and unsettling. Many of the areas and theories of science that appeal to me, particularly ones that deal with vast expanses of space and time, are so complex that the only way I can truly wrap my head around them is to abstract them. It is through my artwork that I interpret, contemplate and fine-tune these scientific theories and notions on both a universal and personal level.

Flight of the Baji was on view last year at the Baltimore Museum of Art, a culmination of Latiano winning the 2013 Baker Artist Award. You can also catch an interview with him over on I Lobo You.







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Hundreds of Vibrant Doors Found Within Lithuania’s “Garage Towns” Photographed by Agne Gintalaite


Lithuanian artist Agne Gintalaite has always been attracted to the “garage towns” of her native Lithuania—large areas filled with storage units for cars that were terribly inconvenient and often bus rides away from the owners’ homes. In her series Beauty Remains, Gintalaite explores the multitude of garage doors she has discovered on her explorations, the brightly colored wooden and metal doors that look as if time has tried to claw them to pieces, yet their vibrancy withstands each passing year.

Her project began after a recent trip to IKEA revealed a sprawling garage town near the megastore filled with hundreds of examples of these doors that outlasted the time when IKEAs were nowhere to be found. “By documenting these objects that are, most likely, about to disappear from Lithuanian society, I wished to communicate to the viewer the ambivalent, aesthetic, but also human significance of these garage doors,” said Gintalaite. “Beautifully painterly, these doors do not need be explained to the beholder. It is the fascinating play of colour and texture that I attempted to capture with my camera.”

In documenting these doors the artist also found herself documenting human dignity as the owners continue to hold onto their property in areas in which big businesses increasingly impede on the urban landscape. “As long as they last,” said Gintalaite, “this uncanny beauty remains.”

Gintalaite received her BA in Art History and Theory from Vilnius Academy of Arts in Lithuania, and is currently a freelance photographer and art director. You can find more of her work on her Tumblr and Behance. (via My Modern Met)










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These self-propelled kinetic wood sculptures by David C. Roy can spin for nearly a day


Since graduating in 1974 from Boston University with a degree in physics, artist David C. Roy has been fascinated by the motion and mechanics of kinetic sculptures. Roy is a self-taught woodworker who designs limited edition wall-mounted sculptures powered by various mechanical wind-up mechanisms without the aid of electricity. Each piece can run for about 5-18 hours unassisted on a single wind, with his latest piece Dimensions capable of whirling around for a whopping 40+ hours. From his Connecticut studio Roy has produced over 150 one-of-a-kind designs over the last thirty years, many of which he currently sells as editions through his website. He’s also gone to great lengths to film many of his sculptures which you can watch on his Youtube channel. (via Booooooom)









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An Interview With Artist Beth Cavener Who Captures Human Emotions Through Sculpted Stoneware Animals

[Briefly NSFW?] Artist Beth Cavener (previously) explores the extremes of human emotion and psychology through the articulated forms of animals. The twisting shapes of oversized predatory cats, foxes, goats, and other animals are meant to depict the internal and external human struggles of fear, anger, love. “On the surface, these figures are simply feral and domestic individuals suspended in a moment of tension,” Cavener shares, “[but] beneath the surface, they embody the consequences of human fear, apathy, aggression, and misunderstanding.”

Filmmaker Bas Berkhout of Like Knows Like recently interviewed Cavener in her Montana studio to learn more about the inspiration and process behind her sculpture for a new short film. If you’re interested, the video shows the artists working on two new pieces: Trapped and Foregiveness. (via Juxtapoz)





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The Wonderland Book: Photographer Kirsty Mitchell Honors Her Mother Through Lavish Conceptual Portraits

24_She'll Wait For You In The Shadows Of Summer

Fine art photographer Kirsty Mitchell’s (previously) award-winning series of conceptual portraits titled Wonderland will soon be available as a book by the same name. Wonderland began as a small project in 2009 when Mitchell decided to explore childhood stories shared by her mother, an English teacher, who died from cancer several years earlier. Models dressed in lavish costumes were shot against natural settings like deeply wooded forests to evoke the elements of mystery and fantasy enjoyed by Mitchell’s mother. While portraits from the series are extremely detailed and vivid, they remain intentionally ambiguous enough for readers to project their own stories onto them.

The success of her first few photos drove the artwork into uncharted territory as the photoshoots grew into increasingly ornate endeavors where costumes and props for each image were sewn, painted, and assembled by hand, requiring up to five months of prep for a single shot. Mitchell recounts the series’ evolution in an essay on her website. The full collection of 74 storybook images will soon be available in an actual publication currently funding (with wild success) on Kickstarter.

3_Wonderland images collage 1

4_Wonderland images collage 2


5_Wonderland London show

21_The Stars Of Spring Will Carry You Home

23_The Fade Of Fallen Memories

1_Kirsty in Studio

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