Art Photography

Giant Humans Overtake Landscapes in Guillaume Chiron’s Clever Collages

June 6, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Collage artist Guillame Chiron combines myths of the wild west and mid-century domestic life in humorous collages. Playing with scale and context, Chiron inserts oversized humans into urban landscapes, or shrinks down people to fit astride cats or on meteors in the galaxy. Chiron has also published a book of 250 collages. You can see more of the French artist’s collages on Tumblr and Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Animation

A Five-Part Stop Motion Anthology Tests the Limits of Short Film

June 6, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

This Magnificent Cake! is a new stop motion animation by Belgium-based filmmaker pair Emma De Swaef and Marc James Roels (previously) which tests the physical limits of short film. The 44-minute, 5-chapter anthology is just over the cut for what can be considered a short film, yet is far more condensed then one that is a traditional longer format. Described as a “mid-length film,” the work follows five different characters through colonial Africa in the late 19th-century which include a “troubled king, a middle-aged Pygmy working in a luxury hotel, a failed businessman on an expedition, a lost porter, and a young army deserter.”

The film premiered at this year’s Cannes Film Festival and will be screened at the upcoming Animafest Zagreb 2018, Annecy Festival 2018, and Anima Mundi Brazil 2018. You can see the trailer for the animation above, and more short films by de Swaef and Roels on Vimeo. (via Short of the Week)

 

 



Art

Astonishing Origami by Robby Kraft

June 5, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Designed by Robby Kraft

Brooklyn-based polymath Robby Kraft currently teaches coding to artists and designers at Parsons and the School for Poetic Computation, but his love for the connected worlds of art and math began at a young age; he started folding origami in elementary school. More recently, Kraft was introduced to the algorithmic aspects of origami. Around 2013, he began to learn more through Erik Demaine’s origami lectures at MIT, and Robert Lang’s books. In addition to folding increasingly intricate works designed by others in the origami community, about two years ago Kraft started using algorithmic code to design new origami patterns.

Kraft is also a classical musician, and describes the similarity between sheet music and origami: “the crease pattern and diagrams are instructions on a mathematically flat 2D manifold, impossible in the real world, so to fold an origami is to capture it into the real world and add imperfections.” Kraft is working on releasing the code he created to the public, and he shares with Colossal that in the future he hopes to publish a book on origami design. You can follow his work on Instagram and Twitter.

Designed by Brian Chan

Designed by Jun Mitani

Design credits clockwise from top left: Bernie Peyton, Pham Dieu Huy, Beth Johnson, H.T. Quyet

Designed by Roman Diaz

Designed by Robby Kraft

Designed by Tom Hull

Designed by Yutaka Naito

Designed by Fumiaki Kawahata

 

 



Illustration

Swirling Lines and Swaths of Charcoal Form Dramatic Portraits by Lee.K

June 5, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Seoul-based artist Lee.K creates incredibly dynamic portraits using combinations of charcoal, pencil, and ink. The artist layers fine cross contour lines over broad swaths of charcoal to build hair, cheekbones, noses, and eyes with a strong sense of life despite the grayscale palette. You can see more from Lee on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 

 



Photography

Mythical Creatures and Greek Gods Leap From Waves Captured off the South Coast of England

June 5, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

“Sedna,” all images provided by Rachael Talibart

As a child, photographer Rachael Talibart would sit on a deck near her family’s home on the South Coast of England and imagine the mythical creatures that would form and instantly evaporate inside the crashing waves. As she grew older she studied the sea monsters described in Homer’s Odyssey and used this education to fuel her current series, Sirens. Instead of merely capturing the haphazard way waves might form during violent storms, Talibart uses a fast shutter piece to freeze the water into sculptural shapes that appear like gods or monsters rising out of the sea. 

In several images, faces can be seen at the forefront of the wave, charging above the sea in a powerful arc. The faces are hauntingly present, as if a monster is truly locked in the tumultuous sea. “For me, the ocean will always be a potent source of inspiration,” Talibart explains. “It makes small, unimportant things of us all yet, at the same time, it is exhilarating and profoundly life affirming.”

The series has shifted and evolved since its start in 2016, including the creation of a fine art book by the same title published by Triplekite. Talibart’s photographs are included in an exhibition titled Tides + Falls at Sohn Fine Art Gallery in Lenox, Massachusetts, which opens on September 7 and runs through November 11, 2018. You can see more examples from her Sirens portfolio on her website and Instagram. (via Wired)

"Goliath"

“Goliath”

"Ceto"

“Ceto”

"Aphrogeneia"

“Aphrogeneia”

"Hippocamp"

“Hippocamp”

"Loki"

“Loki”

"Medusa"

“Medusa”

"Thetis"

“Thetis”

"Mishipeshu Roars"

“Mishipeshu Roars”

"Pounce"

“Pounce”

"White Walker"

“White Walker”

 

 



Amazing

Watch a Vinyl Record Spin so Quickly That it Shatters

June 4, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

The Slow Mo Guys (Dan Gruchy and Gavin Free) have found fame creating slow motion videos of otherwise undetectably fast movements. Their latest experiment, filmed at 12,500 frames per second, shows a vinyl record spinning so quickly that it shatters into an estimated 50,000 pieces. (via Laughing Squid)

 

 



Art

Not a Petting Zoo: Fish, Dogs, and Monkeys Comprised of Shimmering Glass Shards

June 4, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

All images courtesy of Berengo Studio

Polish artist Marta Klonowska (previously) continues her unique sculptural technique of using thousands of shards of glass to form colorful animals. Many works are based on animals found in paintings from the past, and the artist often situates her sculptures in proximity to the inspiring artworks. Klonowska resides in Warsaw and is represented by Berengo Studio in Venice and Lorch+Seidel Contemporary in Berlin.

Photo credit: Peter Cox. Still Life With Flowers, Fruits and a Dog, After Abraham Van Strij, 2016, Glass

Photo credit: Peter Cox. Still Life With Flowers, Fruits and a Dog, After Abraham Van Strij, 2016, Glass

Photo credit: Francesco Allegretto. The Fish, 2013

Photo credit: Francesco Allegretto. The Fish (detail), 2013

Photo credit: Francesco Allegretto

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Animal Multi-Tool