Rainbow Drip Vessels by Brian Giniewski Ceramics 

Ceramic artist Brian Giniewski produces delightful earthenware vessels that appear to be oozing thick, colorful drips that are frozen in time. The Philadelphia-based ceramicist achieves the texture of the vases and bowls by applying a gritty, matte slip to each piece which contrasts nicely with a special glossy glaze made to melt into drips during the firing process. Giniewski is currently Kickstarting a move into a new studio space and is offering a variety of unique objects. You can see more of his work on Instagram and in his online shop.

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Two Decades of South Korean Corner Store Illustrations by Me Kyeoung Lee 

Artist Me Kyeoung Lee has spent the last two decades documenting the tiny convenience stores and corner shops that dot the streets of South Korea. She illustrates the stores, which are now quickly disappearing, with a dedication to the small details that make each unique. Mismatched chairs can be seen lined up out front, while tall cherry blossom or persimmon trees shade the buildings’ entrances.

Me Kyeoung Lee draws each of her illustrations with acrylic pens, and chooses to sketch each at noon to avoid the hazy shadows cast by early mornings or late afternoons. You can see more of her illustrated documentation on her website. (via Booooooom, Creative Boom)

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Digital Photo Collages of Dreamlike Scenes by Hüseyin Sahin 

Turkish art director and visual artist Hüseyin Şahin has an uncanny eye for combining disparate photographs into cohesive scenes, where technology, nature, and humankind collide. Sahin works with a variety of digital photographs which he then edits into collages that he shares on Instagram and Behance. (via ARCHatlas)

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Ephemeral Rugs Formed From Oklahoma’s Red Earth by Rena Detrixhe 

Oklahoma-based artist Rena Detrixhe creates installations from finely sifted dirt, ephemeral rugs that she stamps with ornate patterns. The dirt used for the works is collected by hand from her surrounding Oklahoma landscape, bringing an important context to the earth-based faux textiles.

“This rich red earth is the land of the dust bowl, the end of the Trail of Tears, land runs and pipelines, deep fault-lines and hydraulic fracturing,” said Detrixhe in her artist statement. “There is immense beauty and pride in this place and also profound sorrow. The refining and sifting of the soil and the imprinting of the pattern is a meditation on this past, a gesture of sensitivity, and the desire for understanding. It is a meticulous and solitary act.”

By using this fleeting form Detrixhe questions the permanent decisions that have been made to the region’s environment. One of her red dirt rugs is currently a part of the group exhibition Shifting Landscapes at Form & Concept in Santa Fe, New Mexico through May 20, 2017. You can view a time-lapse video of Detrixhe installing one of her rugs in the video below. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Miniature Displays of Contemporary Urban Buildings by Joshua Smith 

Working at 1:20 scale, artist Joshua Smith builds in-depth works that capture the layered existences of urban environments in cities such as Hong Kong, Sydney, and Los Angeles. His miniature buildings showcase the details and detritus left by the diverse population of each city, bringing in elements of the city’s workers, inhabitants, and street artists. These marks can be seen through heavily graffitied exteriors, and thoughtful additions like a small table on the roof of one building with takeout food from the tiny Chinese restaurant below.

Smith has been working on this series for the last two years, after stints as both a stencil artist and gallerist. Using several reference photos from a building’s actual site, he utilizes MDF, cardboard, and plastic to create the base of the work, and chooses paint and chalk pastels for the exterior’s details. Smith’s newest four-story work took him three months to complete, often working 8-16 hours a day.

The Australian artist recently exhibited his miniature buildings with Muriel Guepin Gallery at VOLTA Art Fair in New York City from March 1-5. You can see more of his work on his Instagram and Facebook. (via My Modern Met)

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A Fold Apart: A NASA Physicist Turned Origami Artist 

In 2001 NASA physicist Robert Lang quit his job to focus on his one true passion: creating original origami designs. With a deep understanding of mathematics and materials, Lang’s folding designs have been incorporated into everything from spacecraft to airbags. His works aren’t limited to functional objects, he’s also produced a wide range of original artworks that have been exhibited around the world. The Great Big Story recently sat down with Lang for this brief interview. (via Uncrate)

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