Art Photography

Puzzling Portraits of Identical Twins by Photographer Alma Haser

November 29, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

In her latest series, German photographer Alma Haser combines the portraits of several pairs of twins by literally puzzling their images together. Haser first photographs each twin separately, then prints their corresponding photograph onto a 500 or 1000-piece puzzle. Finally, Haser painstakingly switches every other piece to create two works that are an equal combination of each sibling.

In earlier works in the series Haser only switched the twins’ faces, rather than melding their entire portraits. In the side-by-side images of the the twin brothers below it is difficult to tell if anything is swapped, unless you narrow your focus to the subjects’ eyes.

Haser recently contributed a few portraits from this series to the group exhibition The Body Issue: Human Stories at NOW Gallery in London. You can see more of her portraiture involving twins on her website and Instagram, and shop select prints on her online store. (via Hi-Fructose)

 

 

 



Art

The Monolith: Artist Gwyneth Leech Turns the Destructive Force of a New Building Into a Source of Inspiration

November 29, 2017

Christopher Jobson

NYC artist Gwyneth Leech is probably best known for her ongoing series of colorful painted cup suspensions, a project that began when she “bribed” herself with a cup of coffee in the morning on the way to her Midtown Manhattan studio, a mental trick to help overcome the nemesis of artist’s block and the drudgery of living in the city. Facing a string of personal losses, Leech was shocked to learn that the pending construction of a high-rise hotel would soon block her 13-story view of the skyline—she would also soon lose one of her primary sources of inspiration.

However, instead of moving to a new studio, Leech decided to incorporate the rising construction site into her artistic practice, painting the structure day by day as it slowly encroached outside her window. Filmmaker Angelo J. Guglielmo, Jr. deftly captures this flurry of creativity against a stark backdrop of grief. Via Ivan Kander for Short of the Week:

Proving the power of art, Leech is able to transform the pedestrian (like the coffee cups she’s famous for doodling on) into the profound. A construction site is magically transformed into a symbolic representation of one’s place in life. And, in turn, the film ends up being greater than sum of it’s parts—a short that while not the most polished visually, really grabs the viewer emotionally, without ever succumbing to saccharinity.

You can follow more of Leech’s artwork on Instagram.

 

 



Art Photography

Isolated Facades Stand Precariously in the Twilight by Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy

November 28, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Facades is an ongoing series by French photographer Zacharie Gaudrillot-Roy (previously) which strips isolated buildings of everything but their forward-facing exteriors. In his third iteration of the project he presents the facades of small homes, boutiques, and stately mansions at dusk. The structures are lit by the last waning light of day, in addition to a few street lamps that dot the lonely roads.

Gaudrillot-Roy started the project several years ago to examine what would happen when he digitally erased the possibilities that lie behind a building’s front door. In this world, the buildings have no tenants, which prevents any secrets from lurking behind the presented brick veneers. You can see more of Gaudrillot-Roy’s facades from previous projects on his Instagram and website. (via Cross Connect Magazine)

 

 



Craft Design Food

Colorful Paper Foods and Patterns by Maud Vantours

November 28, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Paper artist Maud Vantours brings paper to life through a wide variety of commercial and self-initiated projects that span 3D paper sculpture displays for top brands to editorial work for magazines and ad agencies. The French designer has also explored a more artistic realm with her organic Oscillations series. Vantours shares some of her most recent work on Instagram.

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

Photography / Charlotte Ortholary @Figure.fr

 

 



Art

Figures in Silhouette March Across Building Facades in New Murals by David de la Mano

November 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Spanish artist David de la Mano (previously) depicts anonymous hordes of soldier-like silhouettes marching to unknown destinations inside a dystopian world. The figures have arms and legs that appear to morph into tree limbs and roots—a reference to displacement—while some appear to have the heads of animals like birds or dogs. His most recent pieces appear to consciously draw connections to the ongoing refugee crisis. The artist is currently in London ahead of an upcoming solo show titled “Adrift” at Hang-Up Pictures. Via Hang-Up:

In a world of those forced to flee, of poverty, of war and violence, David de la Mano paints his haunting figures as shadows looking for their place in the world. All united, they are travelling to a destination unknown. Boats with broken sails and women with animal heads drift without direction but are all linked by an uncertain journey.

Adrift portrays the anonymous epic of travelling on a rough ship, or passing through reinforced wire fences – all characteristics of the current fear of some nations to the refugee invasion. Adrift analyses the timeless concept of migration and group behaviour. It refers to the drifting movement that characterises the migrant’s journey and the determination and strength that grows and develops when your house and your neighbourhood have already been disfigured.

De la Mano is producing a number of new acrylic, coffee, and ink works for the Adrift show, with a portion of proceeds from one edition to be donated to the Refugee Community Kitchen. Seen here are a number of recent murals in London, Germany, and Italy, with additional murals on his blog. (via StreetArtNews)

 

 



Art Illustration Science

The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel: A Compendium of Colorfully Rendered 19th-Century Biological Illustrations

November 27, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

German biologist and artist Ernst Haeckel dedicated his life studying far flung flora and fauna,  drawing each of their peculiar specificities with an immense scientific detail. Haeckel made hundreds of such renderings during his lifetime, works which were used to explain his biological discoveries to a wide audience. In addition to these visual masterpieces, Haeckel also discovered many microbes, and coined several scientific terms commonly known today, such as ecology, phylum, and stem cell.

A new book from Taschen titled The Art and Science of Ernst Haeckel outlines the 19th-century artist-biologist’s most important visual works and publications across a hefty 704 pages. The compendium includes 450 drawings, watercolors, and sketches from his research, which was in large support of Darwin’s theory of evolution. Most notably the book contains the Kunstformen der Natur (Art Forms in Nature), a collection of 100 prints of varying organisms originally published between 1899 and 1904.

You can learn more about the collection of illustrations and Haeckel’s discoveries on Taschen’s website. (via Fast Co. Design)

 

 



Art Craft

Glass Vases Formed Within Wooden Enclosures by Scott Slagerman Studio

November 27, 2017

Christopher Jobson

To explore the symbiotic relationship between two vastly different materials, LA-based artist Scott Slagerman in a collaboration with Jim Fishman created this elegant Wood & Glass series. Each glass vase is formed by blowing it directly into a shape cut from wood while it lays flat on a table, ensuring the disparate objects fit perfectly like puzzle pieces. For a labor-intensive process that requires a precise dance of speed and movement, the added difficulty of working with a flammable enclosure seems remarkable. From Slagerman’s artist statement:

Scott Slagerman has always been captivated by glass – how it is transformed from a fragile, yet unyielding solid state to molten fluidity and back again; and how this mutable substance, through a process that is both delicate and dangerous, can create objects both essential and esoteric. He is fascinated by the role that glass plays in architecture, as well as in the everyday objects that we find around us.

You can see more from the Glass & Wood series on Slagerman’s website. (via Contemporist)