Recent Surveillance Camera and Satellite Dish ‘Nests’ by Jakub Geltner 

Czech artist Jakub Geltner (previously) has been clustering groups of technological equipment in public spaces since 2011, creating installations that address the heightened state of surveillance in our contemporary world. Arranged as ‘nests,’ the sculptures interrupt both natural landscape and urban environments, making the viewer innately aware of how closely they are being watched.

One of Geltner’s latest installations is Nest 06, is a group of cameras installed alongside a pathway leading to the beach in Sydney, Australia created for Sculpture by the Sea. Attached to a curved pole, the devices stare directly down at any passersby with over a dozen watchful eyes. Nest 7, another recent work, dots the side of an aging brick building at Chateau Třebešice, bringing surveillance to the countryside rather than a bustling urban setting.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Go See This Eclipse: A Scaled Simulation by Alex Gorosh 

In this new short film, director Alex Gorosh walks us through next week’s total solar eclipse and explains why it’s so important to see it. The mix of archival footage, scientific explanation, and a brief outdoor simulation to demonstrate scale similar to his 2015 video about the solar system, all make a compelling emotional argument that this eclipse shouldn’t be missed. Just make sure you’re prepared.

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , , , .

Islands Digitally Composed From Images of Abandoned Sites by Fabio Araujo 

Brazilian designer Fabio Araujo digitally composes images of abandoned sites to create undesirable islands, small patches of earth ripped up from long neglected corners of civilization. The series, Abandoned Places, exists both as image and video as Araujo animates discrete elements of the works to play in a loop. These areas serve as the only “living” aspect in-frame, focusing on a single deer or bubbling creek that has managed to survive amidst crumbling architecture and rusted water towers.

Araujo explores a similar island concept in another work titled Favela, a much larger creation that seems to float through the sky rather than a flat matte background. You can see more of Araujo’s digitally composed pieces on his Behance and Instagram.

See related posts on Colossal about .

School of Visual Arts Continuing Education Fall 2017 Information Sessions (Sponsor) 

Meet our faculty and learn about our courses. Get the inside scoop on career opportunities and discover the latest on what we have to offer.

Sessions begin at 6:30pm and are open to the general public, free of charge.

 — Advertising: Tuesday, August 22, 209 East 23rd Street, Room 502
 — Computer Art: Thursday, September 7, 133/141 West 21st Street, Room 301C
 — Design: Monday, August 21, 209 East 23rd Street, Room 502
 — Film, Video and Animation: Monday, August 21, 209 East 23rd Street, Room 502
 — Fine Arts: Drawing, Painting, Sculpture and Printmaking: Monday, August 28, 133/141 West 21st Street, Room 602C
 — Illustration and Cartooning: Thursday, September 7,  209 East 23rd Street, Room 311
 — Interior Design: Thursday, September 7, 133/141 West 21st Street, Room 1104C
 — Photography: Thursday, August 31, 214 East 21st Street, Room 205A
 — Visible Futures Lab: Wednesday, September 6, 132 West 21st Street, 7th floor, (session begins at 6pm)
 — Visual Narrative: Thursday, September 7, 136 West 21st Street, 11th floor

For more details on each information session please visit sva.edu/ce.

Figural Lace Sculptures Attached to Found Wood by Agnes Herczeg 

Hungarian artist Agnes Herczeg creates figural lace works of female forms, capturing figures in moments of contemplation or work. In one piece the subject stands at a loom, appearing to weave herself from the included fibers. In each of her works Herczeg uses all natural materials, incorporating small pieces of wood or other found materials to serve as a sculpture’s bed frame, hair accessory, floating vessel, or small shelf.

Herczeg studied textile conservation at the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, and over the years has gathered several methods of embroidery and lace-making to use in her work such as needle lace, pillow lace, macramé, and more. You can purchase her lace sculptures directly from her website, both attached to found natural objects and as individual lace works. (via Metafilter)

See related posts on Colossal about , .

The Phenomenon Of “Crown Shyness” Where Trees Avoid Touching 

Photo © Dag Peak. San Martin, Buenos Aires.

Crown shyness is a naturally occurring phenomenon in some tree species where the upper most branches in a forest canopy avoid touching one another. The visual effect is striking as it creates clearly defined borders akin to cracks or rivers in the sky when viewed from below. Although the phenomenon was first observed in the 1920s, scientists have yet to reach a consensus on what causes it. According to Wikipedia it might simply be caused by the trees rubbing against one another, although signs also point to more active causes such as a preventative measure against shading (optimizing light exposure for photosynthesis) or even as a deterrent for the spread of harmful insects. (via Kottke, Robert Macfarlane)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 12 of 853«...11121314...»