Sponsor // Create a Stunning Website or Portfolio with Squarespace 

q2-digital-banners-uncrate-960x640-photographer

Squarespace makes it easy to create stunning websites, portfolios, blogs, and online stores without having to touch a line of code. Showcase your work beautifully with full-screen presentations and dynamic slideshows that look spectacular on every device. Set up a functioning website in minutes using Squarespace’s intuitive and easy-to-use tools.

Check out these websites powered by Squarespace of artists whose work was recently featured on Colossal: Jeremy Mann, Erik Johansson, Jess Riva Cooper, and Allison May Kiphuth.

Squarespace’s inclusive, all-in-one service provides content management, hosting, domains, social integrations, e-commerce, and 24-hour customer support. Features include dozens of award-winning templates, simple and intuitive drag-and-drop functionality, a free professional logo maker, and Google apps integration.

Start a free 14-day trial at Squarespace.com (no credit card required). Use the code THISISCOLOSSAL for 10% off your first purchase.

New Architectural Watercolors by Maja Wronska 

maja-1

We’ve long enjoyed the work of painter and architect Maja Wronska (previously) who depicts unique vantages of architectural sites through detailed watercolors. Not only does Wrońska capture these buildings in their entirety, but also focuses on the specific details of their construction and environment such as chandeliers that hang within an ancient church, or the pigeons found circling its exterior. These elements are all produced with an eye for how to capture the character of a space rather than just its aesthetic, imbuing her paintings with the rich history found within each location.

Many of her pieces are available as prints and other objects on Society6. You can see more of Wronska’s works and pieces in progress on her Instagram.

maja-10

maja-2

maja-6

maja-3

maja-4

maja-7

maja-8

maja-5

maja-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

1,400 Square Feet of Candy-Colored Resin Layered Onto the Floor of a German Museum 

PeterZimmermann_03

All photos by bernhard strauss, © VG bild-kunst, bonn 2016

Painter Peter Zimmermann has moved his colorful hues from canvas to floor in his latest exhibition “Freiburg School,” at the Museum für Neue Kunst in Freiburg, Germany. The installation is composed of bright blue, pink, and peach resin that appears like a candy-colored lagoon beneath the feet of museum-goers. This resin covers more than 1,400 square feet, layered in fluid patterns that subtly reflect Zimmerman’s abstract works on the walls. These pieces are also multi-layered— oil paintings that symbolize digital media motifs, a theme that has begun to often influence contemporary painting.

“When I realized my first floor piece about eight years ago, it represented an attempt to break with the shiny surface of the synthetic resin works,” said Zimmermann in a conversation with German journalist Till Briegleb. “The fact that visitors actually walk on it necessarily means that the surface will get scratched, destroyed. It develops a kind of patina as a result. Trainers leave scuff marks, high heels leave scratches. All of which are all interesting relicts…. I think that these traces correspond to the brush strokes of the oil paintings.”

Zimmermann was born in 1965 in Freiburg, and “Freiburg School” is his first large solo exhibition that has been exhibited in his hometown. You can sit, step, and stare into his immersive installation through June 19th, 2016. (via Designboom)

PeterZimmermann_10

PeterZimmermann_05

PeterZimmermann_01

PeterZimmermann_08

PeterZimmermann_06

PeterZimmermann_07

PeterZimmermann_11

PeterZimmermann_09

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

An Upcoming Documentary About Tall Bikes and a Family that Prizes Creative Expression Above All Else 

Part film trailer, part home video, part testament to the power of unbridled creativity, this extended teaser gives us a glimpse into the unusual life of the Zenga Bros and their obsession with absurdly tall bicycles. Born and raised in Vancouver, the 6 brothers come from an eclectic family of 9 children who were taught from a young age to explore their own creativity, no matter where it lead them. This belief was embraced so thoroughly it became a lifestyle complete with a set of three intersecting tenets called the Three Beans: Create Everywhere, Redeem Everything, and Be a Fool.

The Zengas have engaged in community art projects since 1999, but the most notable has been the design and fabrication of tall bikes. They first encountered photos of similar bike designs in the late 90s in a zine and soon the boys were singularly obsessed with building their own unwieldy cycles. The bikes have connected them to makers from around the world, taken them on a trip across Africa, and will culminate in an upcoming tall bike tour and film currently in production by one of the brothers, Benny Zenga. The Zengas also produced a film last year with Booooooom titled Skate Heads that’s definitely worth a watch.

The film’s trailer is currently premiering as part of the 2016 Tribeca Film Festival in New York. You can learn more on their website or by following them on Instagram.

zenga-1

phone

zenga-2

zenga-3

Photo by Dave Zenga


zenga-4

Photo by Dave Zenga


zenga-3

Photo by Dave Zenga

zenga-5

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , .

A Creative Barista Devises Method for Pouring Rainbow Foam Lattes 

color-1

Over the last few days Las Vegas-based barista Mason Salisbury has been surprising some of his customers by pouring a regular looking latte or cappuccino that suddenly ends with a flourish of foamy color. The technicolor beverages resemble the patterns from tie dye t-shirts and are fully edible, though exactly what happens to your insides afterward is still TBD. You can watch Salisbury pour a few of the drinks in videos below and see more on Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

A video posted by Mason Salisbury (@ibrewcoffee) on

color-2

color-3

A video posted by Mason Salisbury (@ibrewcoffee) on

color-4

A video posted by Mason Salisbury (@ibrewcoffee) on

color-5

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

A Reclaimed Wood Installation Sourced From the San Francisco Dump by Barbara Holmes 

Barbara_05

“Untitled, No. 5” (2012), reclaimed lath installation at 1045 Mission St. San Francisco CA. All images via Barbara Holmes

Barbara Holmes' installation Untitled, No. 5 is a site-specific example of one woman’s trash is another one’s treasure. The spiraling wooden work that was installed at 1045 Mission St. was completely sourced from the city’s own dump, turning thrown away limber into a kaleidoscopic work that spanned both the length and height of the gallery space.

Using sourced and reclaimed materials is at the heart of Holmes’ practice, carefully transforming the untidy elements into aesthetically crafted pieces. “At first glance my work my appear oddly familiar or utilitarian,” says Holmes in her artist statement, “but on closer inspection of the materials and their re-contextualization, the viewer may need to reconsider initial ideas as they discover more layers of meaning.”

This spring Holmes had a solo exhibition titled “Reclamation” at the SaddleCack College Art Gallery in Mission Viejo. You can see more of her recycled works on her website. (via Dark Silence in Suburbia)

Barbara_07

Barbara_02

Barbara_03 Barbara_04  Barbara_01

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Page 12 of 730«...11121314...»