Photomontages That Trace Light Through Overgrown Countrysides and Abandoned Interiors 

"Thicket" (2015)

“Thicket” (2015), all images © Suzanne Moxhay

Artist Suzanne Moxhay produces photomontage scenes which seem to effortlessly combine elements from both her own photography practice and her large archive of collected images. To compose her taken and collected photographs, Moxhay relies on a film technique dating back to the early 20th century called matte painting, a process where backdrops are illustrated on glass panels and integrated into live-action sets. Using this method she creates the illusion that all of her disparate pictures are one cohesive image, first arranging the fragments on glass, then re-photographing the new configuration, and finally touching up the compositions digitally.

“In my recent work I have been exploring concepts of spatial containment in montages built from fragments of photographed and painted interiors,” says Moxhay. “Architectures are disrupted by anomalous elements – contradictory light sources, faulty perspective, paradoxes of scale. Light casts shadows in the wrong direction, walls fail to meet in corners, an area of the image can be seen either as an enclosing wall or dark overcast sky.”

Moxhay lives and works in London. You can see more of her photomontage scenes on her website. (via ArtistADay)

Eventide (2012)

“Eventide” (2012)

"Arch" (2016)

“Arch” (2016)

"Antechamber" (2014)

“Antechamber” (2014)

"Feralis" (2011)

“Feralis” (2011)

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Ornate Insect Embroideries by Humayrah Bint Altaf Incorporate Antique Materials and Metallic Beads 

Embroidery artist Humayrah Bint Altaf stitches fabulously ornate insects and trees that incorporate antique gold twist cord, hundreds of metallic beads, Rococo threads, and other delicate materials. The end results are scarab beetles that could practically crawl off the canvas and honey bees prepared to take flight.

“I often wander through the woods near my home, where I gather leaves, twigs, feathers and other things I can find to bring back home and preserve,” says Bedford-based Altaf. “I also like to incorporate nature’s treasures into my embroideries and with each piece I feel that a part of me has been embedded into my work.”

With a background in fashion design, Altaf had the opportunity to study at the Royal School of Needlework that helped launch her career in embroidery. She now sells original works through an online shop and shares much of her process on Instagram. (via The Creators Project)

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Cubism and Realism Collide in New Murals and Paintings by ‘Belin’ 

Spanish artist Miguel Ángel Belinchón Bujes, or Belin, has long been known in the graffiti world for his photorealistic murals. After a recent trip to Pablo Picasso’s birthplace however, his work has begun to adopt elements of cubism—now producing creative portraits in a style he’s dubbed postneocubismo. His works are often based on loved ones, breaking up elements of their faces in order to recompose eyes, ears, and mouths into distorted configurations.

Although many of his newer works have moved to canvas, he is still very much involved with making work in the public realm, like the above mural he created for last year’s Meeting of Styles’ festival in Cancun, Mexico. You can see more of Belin’s work on his website and Instagram. (via Arrested Motion)

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Dazzling Images of Glowing Flowers Photographed With Ultraviolet-Induced Visible Fluorescence 

28-year-old photographer Craig Burrows photographs plants and flowers using a type a photography called UVIVF or “ultraviolet-induced visible fluorescence.” If you haven’t heard of it, that’s not a surprise, as it is a relatively unknown process which brings out the glowing fluoresce in plant matter through the use of high-intensity UV lights.

Typically UV is removed through a camera’s lens, however Burrows photographs with a 365nm LED light which is passed through a filter to transmit only UV and infrared light. The dazzling plant life Burrows’ photographs absorbs this UV light and releases visible light at different wavelengths, which allows him to capture colors far more vivid than those seen in a typical viewing condition.

Although Burrows has limited his photography to singular flowers and small arrangements, his next step is aimed at illuminating entire scenes, like gardens, glades, and greenhouses, with 100-watt floodlights. You can see more of the Southern California-based photographer’s glowing plant portraits on his Flickr and portfolio site. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Geode-Like Sculptures Formed From Colorful Layers of Molten Beeswax 

“Pair” (2016), all images via Laura Moriarty

Self-taught artist Laura Moriarty's sculptural paintings appear like long lost geodes, geological mysteries layered with multi-colored rings. The asymmetrical pieces reference the earth not only in their appearance but also their process, as Moriarty heats and cools pigmented beeswax is a way that references erosion, weathering, and subduction.

“Layers of color form the strata of a methodology in which the immediacy of the hand can translate a sense of deep time,” said Moriarty in her artist statement. “Working and reworking molten, richly pigmented beeswax, I build each painting/object through a slow, simple yet strenuous physical engagement, which often becomes a metaphor for the ephemerality of life and civilization.”

Moriarty’s work is included in the group exhibition A Stratigraphic Fiction at the Philip and Muriel Berman Museum of Art in Collegeville, PA through March 19, 2017. You can see more of her work on Artspace and Instagram.

“Points of No Return” (2017)

“Eclipse” (2017)

“Heart Agate” (2016)

“Meteorites” (2016)

“Normal Faults” (2015)

“Hangover” detail (2015)

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A Giant Naturally Occurring Ice Circle Appears Briefly in a Washington River 

All photographs © Kaylyn Messer.

This weekend, word spread via Facebook that a large circle of ice was spinning in small river just outside of Seattle. After seeing a quick video of it in her feed, photographer Kaylyn Messer jumped in her car and was fortunate to witness the incredible sight of this gargantuan ice disc as it spun in the current of the Middle Fork Snoqualmie River.

“The ice circle was pretty captivating,” Messer shared with Colossal. “You can hear the sound of the river flowing continuously. Sounds from the ice periodically interjected with very small sharp cracks and groans. Overall, it was a quiet experience to stand along the river watching the ice circle rotate.”

Ice circles are a fairly rare phenomenon that occur mostly in North America and Scandinavia in slow moving rivers during the winter. The discs are formed when a large piece of ice breaks off in the river creating an effect called ‘rotational shear’ where the current slowly grinds away at the free-floating chunk until its smoothed into a perfect circle.

Messer shares more photos and videos of the ice disc on her blog.

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