A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four ‘Hidden’ Anamorphic Paintings

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

A Rotating Glass Sculpture Containing Four Hidden Anamorphic Paintings sculpture glass anamorphism

Emulsifier is a curious glass sculpture designed by artist Thomas Medicus. The piece is built from 160 glass strips that are hand-painted on four sides with complimentary images. Only when the object is rotated and viewed from the right angle do the images appear. Watch the video above to see how it works.

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DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima

DIY Kinetic Origami Sculpture Designed by Jo Nakashima paper origami kinetic sculpture

Partially inspired by Erik Åberg’s interlocking kinetic cube system Ghostcubes, Brasil-based origami artist Jo Nakashima created a method for building a similar object using a system of 40 paper cubes. For those of you ambitious enough to give it a try he shared a set of instructions on Instructables. Just 45 steps!

If you’re not familiar with Nakashima, he runs the most popular instructional origami channel on YouTube, with some of his videos racking up over 13 million views. (via Instructables)

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Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

Artist Carol Milne Knits with Glass sculpture knitting glass

When first contemplating these glass sculptures by Seattle-based artist Carol Milne, your imagination runs wild trying to figure out how she does it. Glass has a melting point of around 1,500°F (815°C), so how could it possibly manipulated into neatly organized yarn-like strands that are looped around knitting needles. The answer lies in a technique invented by Milne in 2006 that involves aspects of knitting, lost-wax casting, mold-making, and kiln-casting.

First, a model of the sculpture is made from wax which is then encased by a refractory mold material that can withstand extremely high temperatures. Next, hot steam is used to melt the wax, leaving behind an empty cavity in the shape of the artwork. Pieces of room temperature glass are then placed inside the mold which is then heated to 1,400-1,600 degrees Fahrenheit depending on the type of glass. Afterward, the piece is slowly cooled over a period of several weeks, followed by a careful excavation process, where Milne delicately chips away like an archaeologist to reveal the final piece.

You can see much more of Milne’s work at the Glass Art Society, on Facebook, and in her online gallery. (via Lustik)

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Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

Cycling Activists Build Bamboo Car Skeletons to Demonstrate Space Taken by Single Occupancy Cars public transportation cycling bicycles bamboo activism

A few Latvian activists from a branch of the bicycle advocacy group Let’s Bike it recently created a visual reminder of the space taken by cars on a typical road. To accomplish this, the group fabricated bamboo skeletons shaped like actual cars and mounted them on their bikes. The activists then cycled around the streets of Riga for several hours to highlight the absurdity of using a large car to move a single person. The stunt was organized as part of European Mobility Week, an ongoing campaign that explores sustainable urban mobility around Europe. (via Designboom, My Modern Met)

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Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Pair by the sea. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.1, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.1, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.2, 2014.
Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics
Blue & White porcelain shards flower. No.3, 2014. Porcelain shards, fired clay.

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics

Forms of Nature Created from Thousands of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled sculpture multiples ceramics

Israeli artist Zemer Peled explores both the beauty and brutality of nature with sculptures constructed from ceramic shards. The pieces billow and bloom like flowers or sea creatures, taking color from Peled’s use of blue cobalt found in designs and landscapes used in traditional Japanese pottery. The artist uses a slab roller to build sheets of clay which are fired and then smashed to pieces with a hammer, providing a contrast between smooth and soft materials that go into each piece.

Peled was recently shortlisted for the Young Masters Art Prize which opens today Sphinx Fine Art in London, and she’s currently a long term resident at the Archie Bray Foundation. You can see much more of her work in her portfolio.

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Regular Division: A Hypnotic Video Collage Merging Classical Oil Painting and Greenhouses

You can safely file this video titled Regular Division from artist Joe Hamilton under I don’t know what it is but I like it. One way to explain it would be a collaged cinematic journey through ornate botanical gardens … augmented with famous oil paintings. Or something? Intrigued, I reached out to Hamilton and he shares a bit via email:

Regular Division is a collaged video loop that was shot and digitally composed on location in Europe, Asia and the Middle East as part of a new series of works looking at landscape. The series responds to the impact of the digital technologies on our representation of landscape and the effect of this on our relationship with landscape.

Regular Division, the first in this series of works, features a spiral of intermingled scenes filmed from inside a number of green houses and domes. An artificial paradise of foliage under a canopy of gridded glass. The video also features high resolution images of brush strokes taken from classical oil paintings bridging a connection to the traditional medium that has played such an important role in the representation of landscape in the past.

The piece is currently on view at Pablo’s Birthday Gallery in New York as part of the group show ‘Like New Landscape’ curated by Front Company. (via Booooooom)

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