Ethereal Bird Murals on the Streets of Riccione by ‘Eron’

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Italian artist Eron recently completed a stunning pair of murals depicting a seagull and heron taking flight under a viaduct in Riccione, Italy. Each spray painted mural shows a sequence of birds that transition from embossed black and white silhouettes to figures that appear almost completely realistic. Eron is known for his delicately nuanced approach with a spray can which he’s also used to great effect in a series of artworks that depict ghostly figures who appear in the dust beneath exhaust vents. See here, here, and here. You can see plenty more on his website. (via Gorgo, Lustik)

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Sweeping Lace Patterns Cut into Dense Collages of Newspaper Covers by Myriam Dion

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Vendredi 24 janvier, Tragédie de Isle-Verte, 2014. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 57 x 56 in. (144.78 x 142.24 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

Starting with daily covers of the Financial Times, the Gazette, or the New York Times, Montreal-based paper artist Myriam Dion (previously) cuts sweeping lace-like patterns into collages of newsprint. In earlier artworks Dion left newspaper covers intact while delicately cutting her patterns with an X-ACTO knife, but in recent pieces she’s also incorporated collage. Sometimes multiple covers are cut to create repeating patterns or text is overlaid with photographs. The fragile collages are usually titled after each individual newspaper’s date and primary subject, a strange juxtaposition given the beauty conveyed in her patterns can be at odds with the content: “Thursday April 17, South Korean Ferry Disaster“. Via Division Gallery:

At a period in history where printed news faces extinction, Myriam Dion’s intricate newspaper cut-outs explore the intersection between folk traditions and popular culture. Crafting thoughtful mosaics out of world events, she questions our appetite for sound-bite news and sensational art, showing us the quiet power of a patient hand and an inquisitive eye.

Dion had her first solo exhibition at Division Gallery earlier this year which also represented the final project of her master’s degree from the Université du Québec à Montréal. You can see more in her portfolio and at Division Gallery.

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Monday October 20, Blessed Pope, 2015. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 19 5/8 x 11 3/8 in. (50 x 29 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Thursday April 17, South Korean Ferry Disaster, 2015. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 36 1/4 x 22 7/8 in. (92 x 58 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Vendredi 24 janvier, Tragédie de Isle-Verte, 2014. Newspapers cut with x-acto knife, collage. 57 x 56 in. (144.78 x 142.24 cm). Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Saturday, May 31st, Slow Down, 2014, 31″ × 31″, Newspapers cut with exacto knife. Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

dion-11Le Parisien, 1945 / Le Devoir, 100 ans après, 2014, 26″ × 24″, Newspapers cut with exacto knife. Photo courtesy the artist and Division Gallery.

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Installation Artist Chiharu Shiota Casts a Tangled Web of Thread and Keys at This Year’s Venice Art Biennale

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The Key in the Hand, 2015, red wool, old boats, old keys. All photos by Sunhi Mang.

The 2015 Venice Art Biennale is home to Chiharu Shiota‘s ‘The Key in the Hand,’ an elaborate entanglement of red wool and keys that dangle above two ancient looking boats. Living within the biennale’s Japan pavilion, the installation nearly blocks out the ceiling with its mass of crossing strings, and includes a collection of more than 50,000 keys.

The piece points towards memory through its composition of materials as the keys were collected from thousands of people around the world. Each key holds memories of the individual through their previous daily use, and now hangs amongst the many other memory-tied talismans above the heads of passing visitors. “Keys are familiar and very valuable things that protect important people and spaces in our lives,” said Shiota. “They also inspire us to open the door to unknown worlds… I would like to use keys provided by the general public that are imbued with various recollections and memories that have accumulated over a long period of daily use.”

The Japanese performance and installation artist often employs the use of everyday objects like beds, windows, and shoes within her work to explore the relationship between living and dying and to access memories found within these objects. Often Shiota’s installations fill an entire room, yet hold a delicate and poetic composition. Recent solo exhibitions include “Follow the Line” at the Japan Foundation in Cologne, Germany, “Chiharu Shiota: Works on Paper” at Hadrien de Montferrand Gallery in Beijing, China, and “Seven Dresses” at Stadtgalerie Saarbrücken in Saarbrücken. Shiota was born in 1972 in Osaka, and has been living and working in Berlin for the past two decades. (via designboom)

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Photographer Jorge Cervera Hauser Captures Sea Creatures Against Sun-Drenched Oceanscapes

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Jorge Cervera Hauser produces intimate snapshots of underwater creatures, effortlessly capturing their magnificence as they glide through the sea in schools or pairs. Each image displays moments that look as if they were captured in a split-second, yet simultaneously appear dramatically staged. Most of the images included were taken either in Baja or the Mexican Caribbean, and the image of the shark gliding alone through turquoise water was taken at Tiger Beach in the Bahamas. No matter the location, each photograph was taken far away from human life and miles out in the open ocean.

The Mexico City-based artist is also a film producer, yet his true passion lies with the animals he captures within his photography. Along with a few friends he runs a marine conservation NGO called Pelagic Life, which aims to conserve the Mexican open ocean through eco-tourism. Through his organization Cervera Hauser produced the documentary “Mexico Pelagico” which has already been released in Mexico and will be available on Netflix June 1st. More images of Cervera Hauser’s underwater voyages can be seen on his online portfolio here.

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New Blooms of Ceramic Shards by Zemer Peled

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As part of a new body of work on view at the COLLECT Art Fair which opens today in London, artist Zemer Peled (previously) created a new series of “blooming” sculptures from assorted ceramic shards. The new pieces include her continued use of blue cobalt found in traditional Japanese pottery that has been smashed with a hammer and arranged in the form of large blossoms. Peled also constructs much larger cactus-like pieces that can tower several feet tall or even span floor to ceiling. You can see several more new blooms in her portfolio, and catch her on the May cover of Ceramics Monthly. Peled is represented at COLLECT by The Cynthia Corbett Gallery.

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Son Lux’s New Music Video Animated with Hundreds of Pins and Rubberized Thread

In this new music video for Son Lux‘s “Change Is Everything,” a montage of singing faces and geometric forms is set in motion with hundreds of pins and rubberized thread moved across the surface of foam boards. The clip was created by The Made Shop who used a mixture of rotoscoping and stop motion to bring Son Lux’s new track to life through 4,000 frames over a period of three weeks. In this making of clip, director Nathan Johnson details the arduous and surprisingly painful process of moving pins thousands of times. (via Quipsologies, NPR)

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Explosive Splattered Ink Animal Paintings by Hua Tunan

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Photo by Matt Wells

The creatures depicted in Chinese artist Hua Tunan‘s ink paintings seem moments away from escaping the canvas. Each piece seems to pulse with energy, driven by Tunan’s frenetic painting style that borrows from traditional Chinese ink art and Western-style graffiti. The artist also works on much larger canvases with broad strokes of dripping spray paint on urban murals that have popped up around the world over the last few years.

Tunan currently has an exhibition at Galerie F in Chicago titled Earth Spirit through June 6th, and is completing a number of murals around the city. You can see more of his work by following on Tumblr and Instagram.

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Photo by Matt Wells

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Photo by Matt Wells

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Photo by Matt Wells

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Photo by Matt Wells

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