Animation Design History

Ancient Ruins Reconstructed with Architectural GIFs

March 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Parthenon, Greece

Today, views of the world’s ancient architectural wonders are firmly based in their current state of ruin, leaving to visitors’ imaginations the original glory of structures like the Parthenon, Pyramid of the Sun, and Temple of Luxor. NeoMam, in a project for Expedia, has resurrected several ancient buildings through a series of gifs. In a matter of seconds, centuries of natural and intentional damage and decay are reversed to reveal a rare glimpse at what the original structures would have looked like. The creative contractors behind the labor-intensive renderings are Maja Wrońska (previously) and her husband Przemek Sobiecki, who works as This Is Render.  (via designboom)

Pyramid of the Sun, Mexico

Temple of Largo Argentina, Rome

Nohoch Mul Pyramid (Coba), Mexico

Temple of Luxor, Egypt

Temple of Jupiter, Italy

Hadrian’s Wall, England

 

 



Art

Minima Muralia: A Collection of 15 Years of Murals by Street Artist Blu

March 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The newly published book Minima Muralia condenses more than 200 larger-than-life murals painted by Blu (previously) into one 288-page collection. The compendium covers every piece made by the Italian street artist over the last 15 years, including backstage shots and unreleased works pulled from his archive. A special edition of the book has also been released, featuring a 32-page zine, two posters, and a specially-designed book casing. You can order both releases on Zooo Print & Press.

In addition to putting out this recent compilation of his works, Blu has also painted a new mural in the town of La Punta, just outside of Valencia, Spain. The piece was created as a part of the Sensemurs Project, a group of muralists attempting to raise awareness about the preservation of peri-urban orchards in towns affected by rapid urbanization across Europe. You can see this new mural, along with work by Borondo and Daniel Munoz SAN, over on Juxtapoz.

 

 



Documentary

Ai Weiwei’s Film ‘Human Flow’ Documents the Staggering Scale of the Global Refugee Crisis

March 23, 2018

Christopher Jobson

To create his new documentary film Human Flow, Chinese artist and activist Ai Weiwei spent a full year traveling through 23 countries, following the journeys of some of the 65 million people forced from their homes to escape famine, climate change, and protracted wars. Crossing oceans and visiting refugee camps in precarious border cities in Afghanistan, Greece, Iraq, Kenya, Mexico, Turkey and beyond, Ai documented the stories of fellow humans of all ages and nationalities who currently have no place to call home.

The individual stories of several refugees and their journeys—or near perpetual state of limbo—are interwoven throughout the film, though Ai focuses mostly on a macro view that illustrates the unimaginable scope of the unfolding crisis that has enveloped entire nations. By its nature, Human Flow recognizes that there are no easy solutions to these monumental catastrophes that impacts all of us directly or indirectly, whether we choose to acknowledge it or not. A healthy dose of compassion and a recognition of a shared humanity would be a good start.

On a personal note, I felt deeply impacted by the film and strongly urge you to watch it.

On Sunday, April 29, 2018, Human Flow will be screened simultaneously across the United States. Immediately following, Ai will participate in a livestream Q&A with audiences around the country. If you are interested in hosting a public screening in a school, library, community center or elsewhere, you can find out more from ro*co films.

 

 



Illustration

Delicate Inked Lines Form Fluffy Black Cats in Illustrations by Kamwei Fong

March 22, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Using only black ink, Malaysian illustrator Kamwei Fong has created a menagerie of playful black cats. Despite their contextual isolation and uniform style, each of Fong’s cats display unique personalities: some are fluffed and puffed into self-contained balls; others look with curiosity or wariness at fish that dangle or waves that crash from the animals’ own tails. The artist builds each feline form using innumerable short thin lines, varying the density of the marks to create volume as well as a palpable sense of furriness.

Fong has been working as an illustrator since 2010, under the moniker Bo & Friends, and in addition to his cat character, which he calls The Furry Thing, he dreams up similarly charming monkeys, goldfish, puppies, and other animals in his line-driven black ink drawings. Fong sells signed print editions of his animal illustrations in his Etsy shop, and also partners with Galerie Club Sensible in Paris. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

 

 



Photography

Streaks of Light Illuminate Hungarian Forests During a Full Moon by David Lados

March 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

For his 2014 series New Moon, photographer David Lados captured varying streaks of light slicing through remote areas of Hungarian forests, many specifically staged throughout the Mátra mountain range. To capture the contrast needed for his light trails Lados strictly obeyed lunar cycles, only photographing the illuminated targets during the height of the new moon.

Using this technique Lados was able to create an uncompromised glow from the artificial light source, tracing pathways that extend a few feet to the entire length of a pond. You can purchase select prints from Lados’s series on his Saatchi Art shop, and view day-to-day dispatches from his life and other projects on Instagram. (via Cross Connect)

 

 



Art

Oversized Crocheted Doilies by Ashley V Blalock Climb Up Trees and Gallery Walls

March 21, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Ashley V Blalock crochets enormous red doilies that she then installs in site-specific configurations ranging from galleries to stairwells to trees outside. Her ongoing project, Keeping Up Appearances, began in 2011 and has been installed at museums, galleries, and gardens across the United States.

The artist describes the meaning behind Keeping Up Appearances: “Although non-threatening in a domestic setting, in the gallery and at this scale the [doilies] overtake the viewer and cover the walls… Inherent is a compulsion to arrange and place and decorate in order to control or influence a perceived outward appearance. The red color gives away the futility of such an act and hints at the unease that lurks below the surface of an obsessive need to control and arrange.”

Blalock is based in Southern California. She received a bachelor’s and two master’s degrees in sculpture and art history. You can see more of her installation work on her website.

 

 



Art

Life-Size Embroidered Sculptures That Imitate Everyday Domestic Scenes by Gao Rong

March 21, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Gao Rong, Call No. 1, 2012, sponge, cloth, thread, wooden board. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Beijing-based artist Gao Rong sews life-size replicas of everyday objects from Chinese urban and domestic infrastructure. The embroidered sculptures imitate the routine items our eyes often skip over—graffiti-covered bus signs, broken pay phones, and stacks of dirty dishes. Although her works look commonplace, many directly reference scenes or time periods from her life. Level 1/2, Unit 8, Building 5, Hua Jiadi, North Village (2010) is Gao’s imitation of the entrance to a basement apartment she rented while a student in Beijing, and 2012 her installation, The Static Eternity, is a recreation of her grandparent’s tiny rural home.

To create her sewn sculptures Gao first stitches the details of rust and other detritus onto fabric. She then wraps the material around sponges or wooden board, and stiffens the work with metal frames. Adding embroidery to her work is a way for Gao to preserve the traditional skills taught to her as a child, while taking them in a more contemporary direction. “My mother and grandmother made beautiful embroidery,” she explains. “It was their hobby. Unfortunately this skill is no longer valued, so it is being lost.”

Gao was born in 1986 in Hang Jin Hou Qi, Inner Mongolia. She received her BA from the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing, China. You can see more of her work, including these new woven hoop frames, on Klein Sun Gallery’s website. (via Lustik)

Gao Rong, Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Detail of Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Detail of Some Days Later, 2014, cloth, thread, latex foam, steel, 115 x 53 x 50 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Static Eternity, 2012, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, dimensions variable, detail cupboard and thermoses. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, 1-2 Level, Unit 8, Bldg 5, Hua Jiadi North Village, 2010, cloth, cotton, sponge, 260 x 166 x 184 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, 1-2 Level, Unit 8, Bldg 5, Hua Jiadi North Village, 2010, cloth, cotton, sponge, 260 x 166 x 184 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection.

Gao Rong, Station, 2011, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, 255 x 100 x 3 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection

Gao Rong, Station, 2011, embroidered cloth, sponge, metal frame, 255 x 100 x 3 cm. Image courtesy White Rabbit Collection. 

After July 21st - Box No. 2 (2013), Embroidery, cloth, and foam. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Gao Rong, After July 21st – Box No. 2, 2013, embroidery, cloth, and foam. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong. 

Detail of What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For? (2013), Embroidery, Cloth, Wooden Board, Iron Shelf, Leather, And Plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Gao Rong, Detail of What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For?, 2013, embroidery, cloth, wooden board, iron shelf, leather, and plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For? (2013), Embroidery, Cloth, Wooden Board, Iron Shelf, Leather, And Plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.

Gao Rong, What Type Of Car Can A Motor-tricycle Be Exchanged For?, 2013, embroidery, cloth, wooden board, iron shelf, leather, and plastic. Courtesy Eli Klein and the artist © Gao Rong.