A New Mural by Seth Globepainter on the Streets of Montreal

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This clever new mural by Julien Malland, aka Seth Globepainter (previously here and here) just appeared on the streets of Montreal. The piece depicts two children running into each other in his trademark faceless style, but also incorporates the building’s brick facade to create their pixelated clothes. The mural was organized by MU, an organization that coordinates murals around Montreal “to trigger a social transformation and to turn Montreal into an open-air art gallery.” (via This Isn’t Happiness, StreetArtNews)

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Tiny Reclaimed Wood Cabins That Appear Plucked From the Pages of Dr. Seuss

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Dan Pauly builds guest cottages, playhouses, garden sheds, and saunas all appearing to be perfectly suited for an enchanted forest. The small, asymmetrical buildings have a long slanted roof, crooked chimney, and charming front window with built-in flower box. Each cabin designed by Pauly and his company The Rustic Way is built with reclaimed wood, each piece restored to reflect its natural weathered condition.

Pauly’s woodworking history goes back four generations, back to the 1800s when his family emigrated to the US and built several barns in Minnesota (some of which are still standing). This history is embedded into Pauly’s fascination with reclaimed wood. “As I uncover an old barn or shed,” Pauly says, “I realize that it could be the same lumber that my great-grandfather used more than 100 years ago. I think that respect for the craftsmen and craftswomen of the past, and for the wood they used, make a difference in each new piece I create.”

You can see more of Pauly’s cabins on The Rustic Way’s Facebook page. (via Twisted Sifter)

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Sponsor // Get 57% Off the Craftsy Online-Video Class ‘Dynamic Detail in Pen, Ink & Watercolor’

Depict the world around you in fascinating detail using a relaxed, methodical approach. With artist and instructor Steven Reddy as your guide, capture highly detailed scenes as you learn techniques for creating contour drawings, grisaille underpaintings, beautiful watercolors, and more. Enroll in the online Craftsy class, Dynamic Detail in Pen, Ink & Watercolor, for 57% off today — a special offer for Colossal readers.

In these online-video lessons, you’ll learn how to break down a complex scene into an initial sketch that’s light and loose. Then, create contour drawing and a grisaille underpainting that will bring extraordinary dimension to your work, before using a limited watercolor palette to enhance your piece with harmonious color. Finally, finish your work by using contour lines to suggest shaping and hatch marks to create texture.

Visit Craftsy.com today to get 57% off lifetime access to the online class, Dynamic Detail in Pen, Ink & Watercolor, and give it a try risk-free with Craftsy’s 100% money-back promise. Offer expires  August 10, 2015 at 11:59pm MT.

Paintings of Birds Sprinkled with Color by Frank Gonzales

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Artist Frank Gonzales refers to his process as a cross-pollination of elements, a mixture of realism and artificiality expressed through acrylic paintings of birds perched atop plants and crystaline formations. “I like to construct and deconstruct during the process, leaving traces of my journey in the end results,” Gonzales says. His careful depictions of wildlife are somewhat reminiscent of Audubon’s style, but the colorful drips of paint and other surreal elements gives each painting a fresh, illustrative feel.

Gonzales most recently toured around New Mexico with Santa Fe Exports and he has a number of prints and original paintings available through several galleries. You can also follow his work on Instagram.

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New Hand-Drawn Animations and Rotoscoping GIFs by Matthias Brown

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Working with ink, paper, leaves, scissors, and other materials, Atlanta-based graphic designer Matthias Brown (previously) loves to experiment with rotoscoping and other traced animations that he shares on his Tumblr, Traceloops. Each animation is physically drawn, cut, carved and scanned frame-by-frame to create what you see here. Brown has also lent his design sense to a host of brands including Tate Modern, Converse, MTV and others, and you can get lost in more of his trippy animations here.

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A Monumental Sculpture of Colorful Twine Netting Suspended Above Boston

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One hundred miles of twine compose this public sculpture of suspended netting above Boston, a structure that spans the void of an elevated highway that once split downtown Boston from its waterfront. The artist, Janet Echelman (previously), designed the artwork titled As If It Were Already Here to reflect the history of the installation’s location. Echelman also intended the piece to be a visual metaphor—a way to “visually knit together the fabric of the city with art,” she explains.

The installation is 600 feet at its widest, including over 500,000 knots for structural support. Each time one section of the sculpture sways or vibrates in the wind the other parts follow suit, undulating as a single form 600 feet in the sky. As the day progresses the 1,000-pound structure’s webbed surface begins to glow, becoming a beacon in the sky rather than blending into the blue above it. In addition to moving with the wind, the structure also glows in response to sensors that register tension and project light onto the sculpture.

As If It Were Already Here is just one of Echelman’s enormous sculptures, she’s also installed pieces in Montreal, Seattle, and elsewhere. Echelman received the Guggenheim Fellowship, the Harvard University Loeb Fellowship, a Fulbright Lectureship, and was named an Architectural Digest Innovator for “changing the very essence of urban spaces.” You can see Echelman speak about her other environmentally-responsive sculptures in her TED talk here. (via Beautiful Decay)

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A 17th-Century Stanchi Painting Reveals the Rapid Change in Watermelons through Selective Breeding [Updated]

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Giovanni Stanchi (Rome c. 1645-1672). Oil on canvas. 38 5/8 x 52½ in. (98 x 133.5 cm.) / Courtesy Christie’s

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Old master work paintings are frequently cited for their depiction of historical events, documentation of culture, or portraiture of significant people, but there’s one lesser known use of some paintings for those with a keen eye: biology. One such instance is this Renaissance still life of various fruits on a table by Giovanni Stanchi painted sometime in the 1600s that shows a nearly unrecognizable watermelon before it was selectively bred for meatier red flesh.

Horticulture professor James Nienhuis at the University of Wisconsin tells Vox that he’s fascinated by old still life paintings that often contain the only documentation of various fruits and vegetables before we transformed them forever into something more desirable for human use. You can read a bit more about the science behind the changes in watermelons over the last 350 years here. (via Kottke)

Update: Greg Cato writes: “The painting depicts a rare outcome of sub-par growing conditions, known as ‘starring.’ It’s perfectly normal, still happens, and is not the result of selective breeding (although it would be cool if it were).” You can see an example here.

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