Art Design

Fabric Tree Stumps Formed From Pieces of Discarded Clothing by Tamara Kostianovsky

June 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

All photos © Roni Mocan unless otherwise noted

Textile artist Tamara Kostianovsky creates realistic elements from nature out of strips of fabric and discarded clothing. In her latest series, the artist forms severed tree stumps from pieces of her late father’s clothing, integrating his belongings into a landscape of layered, multi-colored logs. The works address the passing of time and allude to the body returning to the environment after death.

The project is inspired by the South American people of the Andes who believe that Mother Earth is embodied by the surrounding mountains. Kostianovsky translates this idea to placing clothing items into sculptures that represent the earth and its environment. She explains in an artist statement: “Fusing the shapes of severed tree stumps of different forms and sizes to a palette indicative of the insides of the body, [the series Tree Stumps] pays homage to the cultural heritage of the people of Latin America, while presenting an alternative way of thinking about our post-industrial relationship to nature.”

Kostianovsky became entranced with the body while working at a surgeon’s office during her adolescence. She continues to make work that examines muscle and bone, often in other species such as livestock or whales. You can take a look inside the artist’s studio by visiting her Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

Photo courtesy of Wave Hill

 

 



Art Science

The Human Microbiome Reimagined as a Cut-Paper Coral Reef by Rogan Brown

June 4, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Using the visual metaphor of a coral reef, artist Rogan Brown (previously) introduces his audience to the diverse bacteria, archaea, fungi found in the human body through paper-based sculptures. The detailed works are created after months of research and hunting for aesthetic parallels that might link the two surprisingly similar worlds.

His series Magical Circle Variations merge these sources of inspiration with a pastel color scheme that can also be found in a coral habitat. “What the reef and the microbiome have in common is that they both consist of biodiverse colonies of organisms that coexist more or less harmoniously,” Brown explains. “There are further parallels between coral and human beings in that we are both symbiont organisms, that is we depend on a mutually beneficial relationship with another species: coral only receive their beautiful colors from varieties of algae that live on them and human beings can only exist thanks to the unimaginably huge and diverse number of bacteria that live in and on them.”

Brown hopes that his intricate paper sculptures will allow his audience to more greatly conceptualize the bacteria-based landscape of the human body. Works like these will be exhibited with C Fine Art at the upcoming Art Market Hamptons July 5-8, 2018. You can see more of his work on his website.

 

 



Colossal

Colossal Daily Update: All the News That’s Fit to Email

June 1, 2018

Colossal

Reading Water by Peter Werkman

We’d like to introduce you to our Daily Update newsletter, a fresh option for staying in the know on the best in art, design, photography, and culture. A short-and-sweet counterpoint to our Weekly Highlights, the Daily Update includes a roundup of articles posted the previous day on Colossal, along with a hand-picked gem from our archive of nearly six thousand articles.

Interested in subscribing or updating your preferences from the Weekly Highlights? You can even check out a real-live previous newsletter before deciding. Click here to subscribe or switch to the Colossal Daily Update: http://eepurl.com/oWVBn

 

 

 

 



Art

Comical Combinations of Ceramic Animals Form Surreal New Figurines

June 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Debra Broz cleverly fuses found ceramic figurines to create comical new animals. From high-fiving horses to boxers with parrot wings, her work exists in the space where familiar and surreal meet. The artist shares with Colossal, “As I look for pieces that match in scale I’m brainstorming: What makes this funny? What makes this strange? How subtle or extreme does an alteration have to be to make someone notice?”

Broz also works as a ceramics restorer, and her professional training and experience gives her the tools to create these seamless amalgamations without making molds or fully recreating the component torsos, heads, and limbs. The Los Angeles-based artist describes her mixed influences of mythology and biology:

I play on the idea of the “mad scientist”, cutting things apart and forming them into something else, like Dr. Moreau or Dr. Frankenstein, but I often find my initial inspiration in the biological world. Some pretty amazing mutations, anomalies and unusual traits have been found in animals over history. “Freaks” have always amazed, but also amused and often frightened people – they are a source of mythology and folklore that is pervasive.

Upcoming projects include a book, scheduled for 2019, and new figurines that branch out to include different materials. You can stay up to date on Broz’s work and see behind-the-scenes on her Instagram. (via Lustik)

 

 



Food Photography

New Distorted Photographs by Suzanne Saroff Capture Skewed Perspectives of Food and Plants

June 1, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Suzanne Saroff (previously) continues her Perspective series, using water and glass to warp the appearance of vibrantly colored dragon fruits, lobsters, cabbages and other flora and fauna. You can see more of her striking images including the still life series titled Shadows, on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Art Design

Sculptural Chalk Drawers by Nikolas Bentel Create Dots, Circles, and Lines on Chalkboards and Sidewalks

May 31, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Designer Nikolas Bentel reimagined the classic slim cylinder of chalk that’s traditionally used for classroom education and sidewalk decoration to create a unique series of Chalk Drawers. Each one features a different geometrically precise pattern that together create the three fundamental building blocks of drawing: lines, circles, and dots.

Bentel used 3D printing and a quinary number system, which allows the Drawers to be used as an accurate drawing instrument for any metric system. The line design can also cross over to to the world of music, to create staff lines. You can find all three Drawers in The Colossal Shop, and you can see more from Bentel on Instagram.

 

 



Animation Dance

Hand-Drawn Frames by Over 300 Individuals Animated Into One Choreographed Performance

May 31, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

349, by filmmaker and artist Kristen Lauth Shaeffer, uses stop-motion animation to create a choreographed dance out of diverse, hand-drawn frames. Over the course of two years more than 300 individuals designed and decorated slides pulled from a filmed dance performance, each lending their own style and energy to their specific drawing. For the frames, the participants were asked to depict a personal relationship. The included pairs run the gamut of familial to romantic, which all weave together to create a synchronized performance. You can see more films by Shaeffer on her website and Vimeo. (via Vimeo Staff Picks)