Artist Adam S. Doyle Utilizes Simplified Brushstrokes to Organically Conjure Animals to the Blank Page

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Adam S. Doyle (previously) creates sweeping monochromatic animals, painting creatures that jump, fly, and swim from his simplified brushstrokes. Doyle’s environmental details are limited, instead focusing on the subject which takes up the majority of the painting’s frame. His howling wolves and pensive rabbits have an illustrative quality to their compensation, something that may stem from his interest in interpreting narratives for book covers, greeting cards, and show posters.

Doyle doesn’t attempt to mask his brushstrokes, but rather lets them evolve organically. He explains that his work always begins with his love of the magic of creation, transforming a blank surface into a living thing. “This act has been with mankind forever and yet never ceases to be awe-inspiring,” said Doyle. “I always want my marks to be visible, to keep this sense of wonder present. I’m committed to making images that speak truth to power, that provide space to breathe, and that use simple forms to reveal and make accessible the heart of stories.”

Doyle has exhibited his lively paintings internationally including New York, Los Angeles, and Hong Kong. Currently his paintings are part of the two-person exhibition Wild at Utah-based J GO Gallery. More images of his works can be found on the artist’s Artsy. (via Samsara)

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A New 100-Day Miniature Painting Project by Lorraine Loots Tackles Vintage Book Covers, the Cosmos, and Furry Animals

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As a continuation of her impossibly miniature painting project, South African artist Lorraine Loots (previously) has embarked on her latest endeavor for 2015: Potluck 100. The new series involves 100 new artworks painted in four categories: Microcosm Mondays, Tiny Tuesdays (vintage book covers), Fursdays, and Free Fridays (images of anything). All 100 paintings are being auctioned on her Instagram account and a limited edition of 10 prints for each work are being made available on her site. Loots also has an upcoming exhibition in New York at Three Kings Studio in July. (via My Modern Met)

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A Towering Home in the Alaskan Wilderness Looks Like Something Right out of a Dr. Seuss Book

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Photo by Jovell Rennie

As the story goes, the original owner of this unwieldy building located in Willow, Alaska built his house shortly after a forest fire with a clear view of Mount McKinley and Denali National Park. As the surrounding trees recovered, the pristine view was obscured and the owner decided to add few more stories, eventually spending a decade adding floors until it reached the 12-ish story tower you see today. Not surprisingly, locals refer to the building as the “Dr. Seuss House” as the design so closely mimics structures you might see in Theodor Geisel’s illustrated storybooks.

While the tower sat abandoned for a while, the Dr. Seuss house apparently has a new owner who is currently working on renovations. Photographer Jovell Rennie and Alaska Aerial Footage recently stopped by to capture some of the images and video you see here. (via Jeroen Apers, Unusual Places)

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Embroidered Paintings and Historical Photos by Mana Morimoto

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Fiber artist Mana Morimoto spares no medium with her vibrantly stitched embroidery that spans sculptures, installations, weavings, and 2D materials like concert tickets and advertisements. Among my favorite of her works are these embroidered monochromatic photographs and paintings. An etching of Isaac Newton is overlaid with rainbows of light and Morimoto even goes meta by embroidering on images depicting other fiber artists, going so far as mimicking the progress of a weaving on an old photograph. You can explore more of her work in Tumblr, Cargo Collective, and some of her works are available as prints on Society6.

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Artist CJ Hendry Draws 50 Photorealistic Foods in 50 Days

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Starting in February, Brisbane artist CJ Hendry embarked on an ambitious drawing project, the creation of 50 food drawings in 50 days, with a new piece posted to Instagram every 24 hours. Each black pen drawing of a photorealistic food set against the backdrop of an ornate French plate is rendered with a stunning grasp of shading and depth. You can scroll through the entire collection of photos here, and see some of her earlier large-scale drawings on Analogue/Digital.com.au. (via Boing Boing, The Cool Hunter)

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Sushi Bath Towel Concept by Jenny Pokryvailo

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Designer Jenny Pokryvailo came up with this amusing concept for a series of towels that when properly folded resemble different types of maki rolls. You may previously recognize Pokryvailo’s design work from her wildly popular (and equally quirky) Nessie Ladle, Sardine Paper Clips, and Rainbow Marker Set. (via Laughing Squid)

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Dancing Droplets: Researchers Solve the Strange Puzzle of Attraction Found in Drops of Food Coloring

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A trio of researchers at Stanford recently published an article in Nature that explains the curious attraction found in droplets of everyday food coloring. The paper is the culmination of hundreds of experiments that began in 2009 when Nate Circa was working on an unrelated experiment as an undergraduate at the University of Wisconsin. Circa noticed that when drops of food coloring were placed on a slide they exhibited bizarre behaviors: identical colors would find matches while different colors would seemingly hunt each other.

Circa soon teamed up with Manu Prakash and Adrien Benusiglio who began working on a series of increasingly refined studies to understand why these single droplets appeared to mimic biological processes, resulting in behaviors that looked like chasing, dancing, or avoidance. One of the keys was the interaction of two different compounds found in food coloring: water and propylene glycol. Tom Abate writing for Stanford explains:

The critical fact was that food coloring is a two-component fluid. In such fluids, two different chemical compounds coexist while retaining separate molecular identities. The droplets in this experiment consisted of two molecular compounds found naturally in food coloring: water and propylene glycol. The researchers discovered how the dynamic interactions of these two molecular components enabled inanimate droplets to mimic some of the behaviors of living cells.

This complex behavior is something called artificial chemotaxis which Manu Prakash explains in layman’s terms in the video above:

The physical properties of these fluids give rise to this immense complexity of behavior. For example, chasing and sensing each other, and very much what we call artificial chemotaxis. Chemotaxis is the idea in biology that one single cell can sense where its enemy is, and it brings up all its machinery, and it chases that enemy to try to eat it.

If you really want to get into the nitty gritty of fluid dynamics and molecular physics you can read the full paper in Nature and a bit of a summary on Stanford News. (via, appropriately, F*ck Yeah Fluid Dynamics)

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