Impermanent Anatomical Drawings on Chalkboards by Chuan-Bin Chung 

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Chinese illustrator and anatomy instructor Chuan-Bin Chung encourages his students to understand the intricacies of the human body by drawing them. For many of his lessons he creates impermanent drawings on chalkboards as a helpful guide, but instead of quick sketches as one might be accustomed to, the pieces are exacting and colorful depictions of bones, muscles, and tendons—practically works of art in their own right. Chung shares many videos and sketches of his lessons on Facebook. (via Bored Panda)

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New Magnetized Planters Allow Your Garden to Levitate in the Air 

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For over a year, Swedish scientist Simon Morris has been experimenting with levitating plants, growing common flora while suspended in the air. This system, called LYFE, consists of a planter that hovers just over an oak base powered by strong magnetism. Through this invisible force field house plants are able to hover while also turning slowly to give equal sunlight to each of their sides.

Every LYFE planter is designed as a geodesic form, paired minimally with its discrete base to draw attention to the action of the vessel rather than the piece itself. You can read more about LYFE on their Kickstarter and see Morris’s other floating home accessory, FLYTE, on their website. (via Design Milk)

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Digital Sculptures of Female Forms Rendered in Flowers by Jean-Michel Bihorel 

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All images via Jean-Michel Bihorel

French 3D artist Jean-Michel Bihorel has been rendering films for the past 6 years, while also keeping up with personal projects that utilize the same professional tools. In his latest works, he has produced two digital sculptures of the female form composed of a sample of dry flowers. In the first work the body is completely shaped from the floral sample, the woman shown in different poses that demonstrate her whole form. The second rendered figure is focused on just the torso, and has a cracking marble skin that reveals flowers inside. You can see more of Biohrel’s digital sculptures on his Behance.

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Sponsor // Make Captivating Drawings Simple With 50% Off This Online Craftsy Class 

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Improve all of your colored pencil drawings! Make your drawings more fun and fascinating with a portable, easy-to-use medium! Learn how with professional artist Susan Rubin in her online Craftsy class, Colored Pencil Essentials. You’ll get 50% off Susan’s video lessons — a special, one-week offer for Colossal readers — and learn easy, empowering techniques for color-mixing, application, and more.

With these lessons, which you can watch anytime and as many times as you like, Susan will teach you all the colored pencil skills you need for drawings you love, from setting up your color palette to layering for beautiful effects, capturing lifelike textures, adding eye-catching details and more.

Visit Craftsy now to get 50% off the online class, Colored Pencil Essentials, and enjoy your video lessons risk-free with Craftsy’s full money-back guarantee. Offer expires June 13th, 2016 at 11:59pm MT.

Students Rename School House After Banksy, Banksy Shows Up 

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Photos by Jon Kay

Elementary students at Bridge Farm Primary School in Bristol arrived this morning to discover an eye-opening new mural by Banksy that appeared sometime in the night, but the placement wasn’t random: the building itself is used for a house bearing elusive street artist’s name. Several weeks ago the school held a competition to rename houses and the winners were Brunel, Blackbeard, Cabot and Banksy (the artist’s work first appeared in the city in the early 1990s). When the students returned from half-term they found the new mural on a blank wall of the building.

The new piece depicts a scribbled figure of a child playing with a stick and hoop, but the hoop has been replaced with a giant flaming tire. Perhaps not the inspirational motif you’d expect to adorn a primary school, but we imagine it must be inline with their sense of humor. The mural was also accompanied by a fantastic note:

“Dear Bridge Farm School, thanks for your letter and naming a house after me. Please have a picture, and if you don’t like it, feel free to add stuff. I’m sure the teachers won’t mind. Remember, it’s always easier to get forgiveness than permission. Much love, Banksy.”

(via Arrested Motion)

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Spiraling Rainbow Vortexes Created From Layered Paper by Jen Stark 

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Full Circle (detail), 2014, latex spray paint on PVC, monofilament, 36 x 36 x 76 in., all images via Jen Stark

Jen Stark's work appears like psychedelic wormholes, pulsating and multi-colored portals that might throw you into another dimension entirely. Working outward from an equally prismatic core, the pieces radiate entire spectrums of color from layered paper, PVC, or foam board. These contrasting colors and repetition give the works a feeling of movement and cyclical regeneration and feel almost as if one is staring into a deep and hypnotizing cavern.

Stark’s work concentrates on this hypnotic feel, both in its aesthetic and time-intensive process of layering hundreds of material components. Once composed, the works give the illusion of the infinite, as if their colors never truly end. “The idea of infinity is so hard to grasp, and I love this challenge,” Stark told Colossal. “I think small bits of infinity are the building blocks of nature, like in the never ending patterns of fractals and particles… I think geometry, nature, and mathematics have everything in common!”

We most recently encountered Stark’s work last month during our weekend at FORM Arcosanti with WeTransfer where she was taking a short hiatus from layered paper works to produce customized face paintings in her same colorful style. You can see more of her works and travels on her Instagram, and make sure to look out for an upcoming solo exhibition with Eric Firestone Gallery later this year.

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Vortextural, 2013, installation of hand-cut acid-free paper, foam board, glue, 42 x 35 x 30 in.

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Box 1, 2014, acid-free paper, foamboard, glue, MDF, paint, 10 x 10 x 10.25 in.

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Cosmic Shift, 2015, hand-cut acid-free colored paper, foam board, glue, acrylic paint, wood, varnish, 37 x 24 x 25 in.

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Cosmic Shift (detail), 2015, hand-cut acid-free colored paper, foam board, glue, acrylic paint, wood, varnish, 37 x 24 x 25 in.

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Pedestal (detail), 2013, acid-free paper, foam core, MDF, paint, glue, 22 x 22 x 36 in

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Vortex (detail), 2014, acid-free colored paper, glue, wood, paint, 32 x 34 x 4 in.

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The Whole (detail), 2012, installation of hand-cut acid-free paper, foam board, glue, drywall, 3 x 3 x 3.5 ft

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