Art Illustration

New Bic Ballpoint Pen Portraits on Vintage Maps and Stationery by Mark Powell

September 25, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Working atop faded street maps, vintage National Geographic magazine covers, and decades-old stationery, London-based artist Mark Powell (previously) draws the wrinkled contours of his subject’s faces with a standard black Bic ballpoint pen. The weathered portraits of both famous and anonymous people reflect his antiquated canvases both in texture and tone as he traces the topographies of their faces across literal street maps or paper materials that have traversed the world. Powell’s drawings have grown in both scale and detail over the years, magnifying the impact and density of each piece. You can see more of his recent work on his website where he sells a number of prints and quite a few originals. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

 

 



Art

Asinas II: A Dizzying New Kinetic Sculpture by Jennifer Townley

September 23, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Asinas II is the latest kinetic work by Dutch artist Jennifer Townley who is intrigued by how machines can create complicated nonlinear movements from a circular motion found in rotary engines. The work is a successor to a piece from 2015 that similarly relies on sequential geometric forms that rotate to create seemingly chaotic movements. From her statement about Asinas II:

The various angles and curves of the individual parts create an elaborated unity when joined together on the shaft. The two “wings” formed by these seventy-seven parts are able to slide through each other and rotate in opposite direction at a slightly different speed. This results in a movement that appears to be far more complex, existing of multiple layers, where repetitive shapes seem to be moving within one another.

Townley most recently exhibited work with the Liberty Science Center in New Jersey and you can follow her on Facebook. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Design

A Wind-Up Bamboo Passenger Pigeon by Haptic Lab

September 22, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The Flying Martha Ornithopter is a mechanical toy that when wound, flaps its wings through the air just like a real bird. The simple invention is built entirely from bamboo and Mulberry paper, and released just like a paper airplane. The ornithopter was built by Haptic Lab to honor the very last passenger pigeon, Martha, who died while in captivity at the Cincinnati Zoo in 1914.

Haptic Lab believes the invention is symbolic of humanity’s role in a rapidly changing world. “Like our other projects at Haptic Lab, the Flying Martha ornithopter aims to connect people to their physical environment, to one another, and to the planet as a whole,” says the design studio. “The Flying Martha celebrates the spirit of invention and discovery essential to humanity’s survival and to the survival of our planet.”

Each ornithopter is built to reflect the true size of the extinct bird, with a wingspan of 16 inches. The handmade nature of the toy bird allows its user to customize its flight, solving problems to discover the invention’s best flight path. By a slight twist of the tail to the left or right, its flight course is altered, giving the owner full control of how the bird flies.

The project is currently raising funds on Kickstarter. You can see more projects by Haptic Lab on their website, Instagram and Facebook. (via Kottke)

 

 



Art Crafts

Aspen Trees Grow on Delicate Ceramic Vessels by Heesoo Lee

September 21, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Ceramic artist Heesoo Lee brings the textural depth of aspen forest canopies to her sculptural bowls and vases. Lee painstakingly places each and every leaf by hand, building unique, organic trees that seem to come to life with their shimmering, colorful leaves. While the vibrant glazes add a lifelike layer, the pieces are equally stunning in their unglazed form. The Montana-based artist shares many progress shots and videos on her Instagram, and works are available for purchase on Etsy. (via Lustik)

An unglazed work in progress

 

 



Photography

Aerial Images of Vibrant Landscapes by Photographer Niaz Uddin

September 19, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The Grand Prismatic Spring at Yellowstone National Park (all images via Niaz Uddin)

Niaz Uddin is a photographer, director, and filmmaker that explores a variety of natural landscapes from high above. His color-saturated photographs explore crowded beaches and remote tide pools, capturing each of the scenic environments from a bird’s eye view. One of my favorite images is the picture above, which provides a rare perspective of the Grand Prismatic Spring in Yellowstone National Park. You can see even more sky-high images on his Instagram, and buy limited prints on his website.

Laguna Beach

Laguna Beach

Manhattan Beach

Manhattan Beach

 

 



Photography

Synchronistic Images Captured in Soviet Era Swimming Pools by Photographer Maria Svarbova

September 18, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Photographer Maria Svarbova is fascinated by the sterile, geometric aesthetic of old swimming pools, especially those built during the Socialist Era in her native country of Slovakia. Each scene she photographs is highly controlled, from the subjects of her works to the bright colors and dramatic shadows that compose each shot.

“The figures are mid-movement, but there is no joyful playfulness to them,” says Sarbova’s artist statement about the project. “Frozen in the composition, the swimmers are as smooth and cold as the pools tiles…Despite the retro setting, the pictures somehow evoke a futuristic feeling as well, as if they were taken somewhere completely alien.”

The series, In the Swimming Pool, began in 2014 and is her largest to date. Recently she published a book on the project through The New Heroes and Pioneers aptly titled The Swimming Pool Book which you can pre-order on Amazon. To see more of her photographs centered around Eastern European pools, head to her Instagram or Behance. (via Visual Fodder)

 

 



Sponsor

In Secret Wood’s Enchanting Pendants, Turtles Carry the World on Their Backs (Sponsor)

September 18, 2017

Colossal

Vancouver-based jewelers Secret Wood are known for their fusion of wood and resin to create magical rings. Their latest creation features more enchanting worlds, this time on the back of a turtle.

The recently released World Turtle pendant has a unique feature: it is customizable and interchangeable. Switch between different enchanting worlds to personalize your World Turtle pendant. From waterfalls to winter scenes, coral reefs to blossoms, intricate worlds are artfully created inside the turtle’s geometric shell. The design allows light to shine through, refracting off the shell’s many facets.

These pendants take inspiration from Hindu, Chinese and Indigenous mythologies which tell of the world being found on the back of a turtle. The turtle seemed appropriate for this grand role due to its qualities: perseverance, longevity, and determination.

“We were completely inspired by these mythologies and knew we had to use them in our creations,” explains Secret Wood founder, Roman Wood. “There are so many beautiful landscapes on this Earth, the creative possibilities are endless.”

Much like Secret Wood’s rings, every piece is handmade and unique, ensuring a unique wearable experience. More turtle shell designs will be released in the future.

See more examples of the World Turtle on Secret Wood’s pre-order site. The pre-order for these pendants will run until October 18th, or until crafting capacity is reached.