More Figures from Classical Paintings Imagined as Part of Modern-Day Life in Kiev by Alexey Kondakov 



Ukranian artist Alexey Kondakov continues his ongoing digital collage project “Art History in Contemporary Life” (previously) with these latest additions. Kondakov uses his own photographs of urban Kiev as a backdrop for gods, angels, and other figures from classical paintings which look like they’re joining your daily commute. You can see a few more images scrolling through his Facebook page.







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Geometric Collages Created From Layers of Vintage File Folders and Index Cards 

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Cataloging the tools once used for the very same purpose, Augustine Kofie creates collages that utilize file folders, index cards, and steno notepads from the ’50s through ’80s that were found while scouring the contents of Los Angeles estate sales. Kofie chooses to compile vintage materials from before the dawn of the digital age, a time when data took up physical space rather than gigabytes on an external hard drive.

The desire for collecting these specific paper forms comes from his obsession with historical forms of organization, the physical pen-to-paper process of keeping information tidy. After building collages from the papers in various colors and weights, he utilizes ballpoint pen, silkscreen, and acrylic ink to draw shapes and lines over top. These resulting collages have an architectural appearance, built forms with interlocking lines that mimic the precision of a building’s blueprint.

The Los Angeles-based artist merges his background in graffiti with interests in illustration and architecture to create work that references all three, focusing on form and line most intently in his compositions. Kofie’s solo exhibition “INVENTORY” will be on display at Jonathan LeVine Gallery in New York from November 21st through December 19th 2015.

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An Unusual Cloud Phenomenon Above the Skies of Victoria, Australia 


Redditor big_mac_heart_attack Photographer David Barton snapped this extremely unusual weather event above the skies of Victoria, Australia. Apparently the unusual event is called a Fallstreak Hole (or commonly a ‘hole punch cloud’):

Such holes are formed when the water temperature in the clouds is below freezing but the water has not frozen yet due to the lack of ice nucleation (see supercooled water). When ice crystals do form it will set off a domino effect, due to the Bergeron process, causing the water droplets around the crystals to evaporate: this leaves a large, often circular, hole in the cloud.

Not unsurprisingly, Fallstreak Holes are one of the most common cloud-related events reported as UFOs. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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New Portraits Drawn on Maps and Star Charts by Ed Fairburn 


English artist Ed Fairburn (previously) uses vintage road maps and star charts as canvases for drawn portraits. Cross-hatched patterns and shaded regions inside roads, borders, and rivers assimilate into the contours of faces, as if the images had always been secretly hidden in the map’s topography. “In his hands, both built infrastructure and natural phenomena echo the organic human form,” shares Mike Wright Gallery. “National highway systems become capillaries, and the tangle of Paris’ alleyways become the wrinkles that give the face history and individuality.”

Fairburn opens a new show of work alongside artist John Wentz today at Mike Wright in Denver.









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Photographer Arno Rafael Minkkinen Seamlessly Integrates His Body with the Natural World 

Fosters Pond II, 1989. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Finnish-American photographer Arno Rafael Minkkinen has been capturing self-portraits of his nude body in natural surroundings for the better part of five decades. More than just existing in these scenic locations, Minkkinen fully merges his limbs and torso like a chameleon, blurring the lines between where the world ends and his body begins.

The methods used to create these bold and uninhibited shots pre-date the use of Photoshop by decades, instead relying on a simple 9-second shutter release that allows Minkkinen to quickly pose for each shot. He usually works completely alone, and won’t let anyone else look through his camera’s viewfinder, lest they instead be labeled ‘the photographer.’ What may appear as a simply composed photo with fortuitous timing, is often the result of Minkkinen taking dangerous risks as he submerges himself in strong currents, buries himself in ice, or balances precariously on the edge of a cliff. He shares from an article How to Work the Way I Work:

Many of my photographs are difficult to make. Some can even be dangerous. I do not want to have someone else coming in harm’s way taking the risks I need to take: to lean out off a cliff or stay underwater for the sake of my picture. We control how much pain we can tolerate; such information is unknowable by anyone else. Some of my pictures might look simple, but in reality they can test the limits of what a human body is capable of or willing to risk. Thus I title them self-portraits, so the viewer knows who is in the picture and who took it.

At the age of 70, Minkkinen was just awarded the 2015 Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and is currently finishing work on his 8th book. The photographer opens his first-ever solo show in Chicago tomorrow evening at Catherine Edelman Gallery titled 7 8 9 0 1, featuring a range of both old and new portraits. You can see more from the exhibition here.

Hands and Feet, White Sands, NM, 2000. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Väisälänsaari, Finland, 1998. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Oulujärvi Afternoon, Paltaniemi, Finland, 2009. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Mouth of the River, Fosters Pond, 2014. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Asikkala, Finland, 1992. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

10.10.10, Fosters Pond, 2010. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Fosters Pond, 2000. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Le Bouquet d’Arbres, Malmö, Sweden, 2007. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

Beach Pond, Connecticut, 1974. Courtesy Catherine Edelman Gallery.

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Hatched from a Discarded Egg on a Chicago Windowsill, ‘Camp’ the Pigeon Becomes a Muse for Adele Renault’s Giant Oil Paintings 


Follow the daily adventures of Camp the pigeon on Instagram

In the summer of 2013, Chicago artist George Keaton and photographer Mariah Naella were preparing for their engagement party in Wisconsin when they made a seemingly insignificant discovery that would soon dramatically impact their life. Repairmen who were replacing old window frames in their apartment had quietly left something on their kitchen counter: a tiny egg. The workers had inadvertently destroyed a pigeon nest while fixing windows and randomly decided to salvage the egg.

The couple tells the Chicago Sun Times that in the process of discarding the egg outside, Naella realized something was moving inside of it. Within minutes—and to their great astonishment—it almost immediately began to hatch. Late that night the couple purchased a small syringe at Walgreens to use for feeding, and the next few weeks were dedicated to rearing a peppy little pigeon they named Camp.



Two months later, following advice from a wildlife expert, they decided Camp was large enough to release into the wild, but upon opening the window they discovered he was completely uninterested in leaving. Camp has since become accustomed to flying near their Lincoln Square home, and is free to come and go as he pleases, but has never traveled far and always returns home. The pigeon is now a part of the family, and has become a bit of a local celebrity whose daily adventures are shared on Instagram. He’s even spawned an entire line of prints, jewelry, and and shirts.

On learning about Camp’s story randomly through Instagram, Belgian painter Adele Renault realized she had a new muse. Renault is known for her large-scale photorealistic portraits of people and pigeons, and it wasn’t long before she began documenting the Chicago bird’s adventures in lockstep with Naella and Keaton. A selection of her giant oil on linen paintings depicting Camp during several stages of his life will be on view starting tomorrow at Havas Annex in Chicago. (via Colossal Submissions)









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A Vintage Lincoln Continental Reproduced in Cardboard from Dash to Fender 


Miles to Empty, 2015, cardboard,19′ x 6’5″ x 4’9″ (All images by PD Rearick)

Shannon Goff was born in Detroit, a trigger for her lifelong interest in the evolution of transportation. Captivated by her grandfather’s 1979 Lincoln Continental Mark V, she had considered making the car many times, but shied away due its massive size. “Miles to Empty” brings this longtime dream to reality, a sculpture that is her most ambitious project to date.  The work pays homage to her grandfather and hometown while dually reexamining themes inherent to the Motor City like the American obsessions of luxury and convenience.

Goff considers the work a translation and dimensional contour drawing rather than replica, as pieces like the floor of the vehicle are missing from the final work. Although the color also deviates from the original, Goff believes its stark quality fits the feel of the piece. “I had considered making it the color of my grandfather’s, but in the end I decided white was perfect,” said Goff. “It’s forlorn and forgotten, a ghost rider of sorts. It’s about memory and loss and is ultimately a memorial to my grandfather and to the city of Detroit.”

Goff received her BFA from the University of Michigan in 1996 before moving to Kyoto, Japan where she studied ceramics and calligraphy and worked as a woodblock printer. Since receiving her MFA at Cranbook Academy of Art in 2003 she has taught at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Rhode Island School of Design, Cranbook, and currently at Penn State University’s School of Visual Arts where she teaches alongside her husband Tom Lauerman.  “Miles to Empty” will be on display at Susanne Hilberry Gallery until November 14. (via designboom)










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