Impressive Crocheted Leaf Sculptures by Susanna Bauer

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To truly appreciate the delicacy of Susanna Bauer‘s leaf sculptures, think of crunching a dead leaf in your hand, how it disentigrates into dust with the slightest effort. To work with dry and fragile leaves as a medium for crochet seems nearly impossible, but Baur somehow manages it with ease, turning leaves into cubes, tunnels, and geometric patterns with techniques that might be more appropriate for durability of leatherwork. She shares about her process:

There is a fine balance in my work between fragility and strength; literally, when it comes to pulling a fine thread through a brittle leaf or thin dry piece of wood, but also in a wider context – the tenderness and tension in human connections, the transient yet enduring beauty of nature that can be found in the smallest detail, vulnerability and resilience that could be transferred to nature as a whole or the stories of individual beings.

Bauer has a new exhibition of work at Lemon Street Gallery in Cornwall, England through June 27th, and you explore a bit more on Facebook

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Quirky Monsters Playfully Occupy Abandoned Berlin Warehouses

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German street artist Kim Köster is doing the impossible—turning the typically scary content of monsters and abandoned buildings into interactive entertainment for children. Köster started by spray painting mischievous monsters in derelict warehouse sites outside of Berlin, allowing them to playfully interact with the surrounding architecture. Köster is now turning these works into an interactive children’s picture book called Monzter that gives kids a chance to play with these colorful creatures without having to wander into any creepy buildings.

The app invites the audience to reflect and laugh with the philosophical musings of children like, “Are ghosts able to see me?” and “How big is the sun?” The app is iPad compatible and available in the Apple app store.

Köster was born and raised in the North German village of Worpswede. Originally experimenting with drawing and watercolor, Köster moved into the graffiti scene. Like Monzter, he often employs new media within his work allowing for a wide public accessibility of his pieces. (via Geyser of Awesome)

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New Hammered Steel Animal Head Sculptures by Selçuk Yılmaz

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Turkish sculptor Selçuk Yılmaz (previously) just completed work on three new mask-like sculptures depicting the heads of a lynx, tiger, and fox. Yılmaz uses thin strands of hammered and welded steel that give each piece a beautiful curved musculature. You can see more details of each piece over on Behance.

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The Visually Stunning ‘Tesseract’ Scene in Interstellar was Filmed on a Physically Constructed Set

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Spoiler alert. One of the most jaw-dropping moments of Christopher Nolan’s 2014 film Interstellar is the climactic moment when Cooper (Matthew McConaughey) enters a visually stunning environment that allows him to physically communicate through time using gravity. In the movie, the scene is manifested as a small library in his home that appears to infinitely repeat with versions of every moment that has ever occurred there. Essentially it’s a cube in four dimensions. Here’s a pretty good explanation of how it works:

The Tesseract is a means of communication for the bulk beings to express action through gravity with NASA. The bulk beings can perceive five dimensions as opposed to four, able to see every moment in the past, present, and future as well as influence gravity within any of those time frames. […] The tesseract allowed Cooper to communicate with Murphy Cooper [his daughter] in various time periods, presenting time itself as a dimension rather than linear. Everything is linked by the strings of time, which Cooper can manipulate. The beings made this comprehensible to Cooper by allowing him to physically interact with the Tesseract.

The idea of the tesseract scene alone was so daunting to the filmmakers, Nolan and his special effects team procrastinated for months before trying to tackle how it might work. After months of concepting and model building the team opted for the unusual approach of using minimal digital effects in favor of fabricating a massive set which the actors could physically manipulate. A remarkable feat considering not only the complexity of the concepts depicted, but the cost and labor of building something so large.

Included here are some shots of the set, a behind-the-scenes interview with Nolan and a number of people from the visual effects team explaining how it was done, and lastly the scene itself. You can watch even more of it here. (via Fubiz)

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Remarkable Footage of Plants That Explode to Disperse Their Seeds

The Smithsonian Channel just shared this brief new clip of three plant species that use different methods of propulsion to spread their seeds. The filmmakers captured slow motion footage of violets, touch me nots, and poisonous squirting cucumbers (!) as they explode in some pretty incredible ways. (via Boing Boing, The Kid Should See This)

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‘Chunky Knits’ by Anna Mo Incorporate Enormous Stitches to Comfortably Engulf the Body

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Anna Mo‘s chunky knits are not shy about their pattern, the soft form of her objects forcing the wearer to observe the pieces in all of their magnified glory. To knit these mammoth material works the Ukraine-based Mo not only uses extremely thick sections of wool, but also XXL needles to produce her three-inch-thick stitches. In addition to her wearable works, Mo also sells the yarn that she uses to produce the pieces (100% Australian merino wool) as well as oversized knitting needles so you can produce your own chunky sweaters and blankets.

Mo learned to knit at an early age, continuing the hobby into adulthood as a side project in addition to her work as a designer. Mo uses the tactile nature of knitting to balance her hours in front of the computer, allowing her hands to get as much exercise as her brain. For more images of Mo’s snuggly knits visit her Instagram. (via Beautiful/Decay and ĪGNANT)

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New Laser Engraved Rolling Pins by Valek Imprint Elaborate Designs on Baked Goods

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Last year around this time, Zuzia Kozerska of Valek Rolling Pins (previously) practically set the internet on fire with lasers, more specifically her laser engraved rolling pins that imprint different patterns in cookie dough. Kozerska has been hard at work creating increasingly more complex designs as well as special mini pins just for kids. You can see more in her Etsy shop.

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