100-Year-Old Footage of Legendary Artists Monet, Renoir, Rodin, and Degas Working and Walking Near Their Studios

Three clips from 1915 and one from 1919 show legendary artists within their celebrated environments—Claude Monet creating work in his garden at Giverny, Pierre-Auguste Renoir painting at home, Auguste Rodin sculpting in his studio, and Edgar Degas taking a leisurely stroll through the streets of Paris. Each of the silent short films showcases the artists instead of the work we have come to associate them with, cameras focusing on the men rather than canvas or sculpture. The cinematic choice is an interesting one, giving us a peak at the techniques and facial expressions of the artist instead of any expression made within the work. (via Neatorama)

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New Cubist Tattoos by Peter Aurisch


Based in a quiet undisclosed studio a short train ride outside of downtown Berlin, artist Peter Aurisch creates some of the most original tattoos in the city—and in a place with an estimated 2,000 tattoo artists, that’s saying something. To keep his ideas fresh and original, Aurisch may only begin planning a new piece when the client first arrives. He tends to work freehand without sketches or source imagery, and instead draws inspiration from stories and details provided by his customers.

Aurisch is also printmaker and painter and his works (both on skin and off) are influenced in part by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele, and the cubism of Picasso. We first featured his tattoos over three years ago here on Colossal, and in that time it’s easy to see a dramatic evolution of his style to much bolder lines and more geometric figures.

Aurisch’s studio is called Johnny Nevada, a space he shares with Jessica Mach whose tattoos you should also definitely check out. He takes only a single appointment daily and you can get in touch here. Explore more of his most recent work on Instagram.










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New Mythical Cut Paper Collages by Artist Morgana Wallace


Precious Cargo

Morgana Wallace (previously) began making cut paper collages after her interest was sparked during a monotype session in printmaking class. Wallace was most attracted to the texture of cut paper compositions, especially with unique materials like wallpaper samples. Currently her work revolves around female heroines and mystical beasts, adding detail to her characters with banners and leaves that float around the subjects’ heads and torsos.

Wallace often uses Japanese linen paper in her work because of her attraction to its texture, mixing it with Canson thin card stock to create her characters’ flowing hair. Other materials used in her works include X-ACTO knives, water colors, gouache, and pencil crayons. To create depth and shadows she also uses foam board which adds to the painterly quality of her scenes.

Wallace is represented by Madrona Gallery in Victoria, British Columbia. You can see more cut paper collages on the gallery’s artist page here.





The Red King











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Starting With the Earth as a Marble, This Is the First Timelapse of the Solar System to Scale


When looking in a science textbook or a toy mobile of the solar system, it’s easy to depict the sun, planets and moon to scale in comparison to each other. What’s not so easy to visually comprehend the staggering distance that separates each planet on its individual orbit around the sun. Filmmakers Alex Gorosh and Wylie Overstreet challenged themselves to build such a model and the result is this fascinating short film To Scale.

Starting with the Earth as the size of a marble, it turns out you need an area about 7 miles (11.2km) to squeeze in the orbit of the outermost planet, Neptune. The team used glass spheres lit by LEDs and some GPS calculations to map out the solar system on the dry bed of the Black Rock Desert in Nevada. Once nighttime arrived they shot a timelapse from a nearby mountain that accurately reflects the distance of each orbital path at a scale of roughly 1:847,638,000. Amazing.

If you have more questions about how they did it, here’s a brief making of clip. (via Colossal Submissions)



When standing next to the Earth in the scale model, the orb representing the sun appears exactly the same size as the actual sun.

New Seaside Murals That Change With the Tide by Artist Sean Yoro



Artist Sean Yoro, also known as Hula (previously), seems to be more comfortable on his paddle board than on ground, placing murals in hard to reach places, like underpasses and the side of a sinking ship. It is these seaside backdrops that he creates his hyperrealistic portraits, images of woman that peek above the water when the tide is just right.

The tide was the original inspiration for his new ship-based piece Ho’i Mai. The piece features a woman with arm outstretched, reaching beyond her position in the water. The piece’s title which translates to “Come Back” alludes both to her longing gesture and the tide that hides and reveals her face and limb. (via Junk Culture)












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Large Wire-Frame Sculpture Shows the Glowing Forms of Children Trapped Within Adult Bodies


Photo by Andrew Miller

Ukrainian sculptor, blacksmith, and designer Alexander Milov has produced a large wire-frame sculpture that features the forms of children that glow when day turns to night. The outer sculpture is two adults sitting back to back while the inner sculpture displays the two children touching hands through the metal wires.

Milov’s sculpture titled Love depicts a scene of conflict with hope and innocence rising from within. “It demonstrates a conflict between a man and a woman as well as the outer and inner expression of human nature,” said Milov. “The figures of the protagonists are made in the form of big metal cages, where their inner selves are captivated. Their inner selves are executed in the form of transparent children, who are holding out their hands through the grating. As it’s getting dark (night falls) the children chart to shine. This shining is a symbol of purity and sincerity that brings people together and gives a chance of making up when the dark time arrives.”

The giant sculpture was produced for this year’s Burning Man and is the first time in 30 years that Ukraine has received a grant to produce work for the festival. You can see more examples of this year’s sculptures on the festival’s art installation archive here. (via Bored Panda)


Photo by Andrew Miller


Photo by Andrew Miller

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Jagged Wood Fragments Find New Purpose When Fused with Resin by Jeweler Britta Boeckmann


Melbourne-based designer and jeweler Britta Boeckmann has a way of seeing the perfect in the imperfect, a skill she uses to form a hugely diverse array of wearable objects from fused wood and resin. Each pendant, ring, or pair of earrings is made one at a time by hand without the aid of template, a process that allows the pieces to evolve organically as she works.

After graduating in 2013 with an industrial design degree, Boeckmann moved from Germany to Melbourne (by way of London) where she joined the Wangaratta Woodworkers studio. Working three times a week she quickly perfected her jewelry fabrication techniques and soon found a market for her wares. Boeckmann now has her own studio and sells her pieces online under the brand “BoldB” on Etsy. You can see an archive of her design on her website. (via So Super Awesome)









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