Stretched and Contorted Porcelain Face Sculptures by Johnson Tsang 


Stretching the properties of porcelain clay to the max, artist Johnson Tsang (previously) contorts the faces of his anonymous sculptures into rubber. The comical works morph facial features and body parts, at times cramming the identities of multiple persons into a single being. These new pieces from his “Lucid Dreams” series were recently on view at the Hong Kong Sculpture Biennial as part of Art Asia 2016. You can see the rest of them here.







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Salvador Dali’s Rare Surrealist Cookbook Republished for the First Time in over 40 Years 


Published only once in 1973, Les Diners de Gala was a dream fulfilled for surrealist artist Salvador Dali who claimed at the age of 6 that he wanted to be a chef. The bizarro cookbook pairs 136 recipes over 12 chapters (the 10th of which is dedicated to aphrodisiacs) with the his exceptionally strange illustrations and collages created especially for the publication. The artworks depict towering mountains of crayfish with unsettling overtones of cannibalism, an unusual meeting of a swan and a toothbrush in a pastry case, and portraits of Dali himself mingling with chefs against decadent place settings. Recipes include such delicacies as “Thousand Year Old Eggs”, “Veal Cutlets Stuffed With Snails”, “Frog Pasties”, and “Toffee with Pine Cones”.

Dali is widely known for his opulent dinner parties thrown with his wife Gala, events that were almost more theatrical than gustatory. Guests, many of the celebrities, were required to wear completely outlandish costumes and an accompaniment of wild animals often roamed free around the dinner table. Despite the unusual ingredients and preparation methods, many of the old school recipes in Les Diners de Gala originated in some of the top restaurants in Paris at the time including Lasserre, La Tour d’Argent, Maxim’s, and Le Train Bleu. Lest you think anything in the book might be remotely healthy, it offers a cautionary disclaimer at the outset:

We would like to state clearly that, beginning with the very first recipes, Les Diners de Gala, with its precepts and its illustrations, is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of Taste. Don’t look for dietetic formulas here.

We intend to ignore those charts and tables in which chemistry takes the place of gastronomy. If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you.

Only around 400 copies of Les Diners de Gala are known to survive, most of which sell for hundreds of dollars. However Taschen has finally made this rare book available for the first time in 43 years as a new reprint currently available for pre-order. If this whets your Dali appetite, don’t miss the 150th anniversary edition of his 1969 illustrations for Alice in Wonderland. (via Brain Pickings, It’s Nice That)










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Intricate Rolled Paper Tapestry Designs by Gunjan Aylawadi 


Artist Gunjan Aylawadi works with tiny strips of cut paper rolled into strips and pasted into elaborate mosaic-like patterns in a process she refers to as “weaving with paper.” Unlike quilling where paper is rolled into small components and viewed sideways, Aylawadi’s technique relies on long curled strips that are woven and glued in place in a process a bit more akin to working with textiles. The work is slow and practically meditative as each piece is outlined carefully on paper beforehand with a fair amount of math and geometry—although self-taught in art, she also hold degrees in engineering and product design.

Aylawadi’s paper works have been published in magazines around the world and she’s also shown in a number of group and solo shows in Sydney where she’s based. Her work was also included in CODA Paper Art 2015. You can see more on Facebook and by following her on Instagram. (via Bored Panda)













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The Unexpected: Artists Descend on Ft. Smith to Revitalize the Streets with Murals 



Walking the wide streets of Ft. Smith, the second largest city in Arkansas near the Oklahoma border, one might expect to find small businesses, historical landmarks, the occasional live music venue, and few shuttered storefronts. What you might not expect to see are towering murals from international street artists around almost every corner, but that’s exactly what’s happening with The Unexpected, an ambitious local effort to bring significant public artworks to the streets of Ft. Smith in an effort to revitalize the downtown area.

Funded in part by local non-profit 646 Downtown and curated by JustKids, the event is now in its second year and has brought over 20 artworks that blanket old buildings, grain silos, store facades, and even a sculpture in a small park. The initiative has also engaged emerging artists from both the University of Arkansas and students from two local high schools who were invited to create their own murals around the city.

This year saw new pieces by Okuda, Faith47, Dface, Bordalo II, Jaz & Pastel, Alexis Diaz, Maser, Guido van Helten, and Cyrcle. The artworks went up over the first week of September with the aid of countless local volunteers and support staff. If you happen to stop by here’s a handy map, and there’s even an app where users can navigate to different artworks, submit their own photos and leave comments. You can see all of the completed works from both 2015 and 2016 on Instagram and Facebook. Photos by Raymesh.


Alexis Diaz


Alexis Diaz in progress


Jaz & Pastel




Fiath47 in progress


Guido van Helten





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Buildings Shaped Like Letters of the Alphabet Made with Photographic Collage by Lola Dupre 


As part of a personal project exploring typography, artist Lola Dupre (previously) imagined a series of unusual structures shaped like letters of the alphabet. The artist utilized her well-known collage technique that incorporates existing photographs that are cut into tiny pieces, often in duplicate, to make each building. Dupre recently started an Instagram account where you can see some of her latest completed works. (via Soft Shock)





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Artist Leon Tarasewicz Covers the Poland National Gallery’s Great Hall Staircase in Splatter Paint 


The Great Hall during the exhibition “Polish Painting of the 21st Century,” Leon Tarasewicz, 2006, photo: Sebastian Madejski. All images via We Are Museums



Back in 2006, Warsaw’s National Gallery of Art, Zachęta, held a group exhibition titled “Polish Painting of the 21st Century.” Painter Leon Tarasewicz contributed a site-specific work to the 60-artist exhibition, redoing the museum’s Great Hall in a bath of red, yellow, blue, and green splatter paint. The work splattered the stairs and crept up the surrounding walls, creating a dramatic entrance for anyone entering the exhibition. (via ArchAtlas which was inexplicably deleted by Tumblr last week?)

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