New Portraits of Fashionably Dressed Wildlife and Floral Bouquets by Miguel Vallinas 

retrato-1

In his long-running portrait series Second Skins, artist Miguel Vallinas (previously) uses photographic portraits of wildlife as a starting point to construct fictional wardrobes that he imagines each animal might wear if it were dressed as a human. Vallinas has an uncanny ability to select the perfect colors and textures for each outfit he photographs, bestowing the animals with a clear sense of character and an unusual authenticity.

On the surface, Second Skins is a humorous series of portraits guaranteed for a smile, but dig a bit deeper and Vallinas suggests the images reveal a more about human nature than the animal kingdom. Specifically, how we perceive people based on appearance and how we create narratives in our mind based wholly on what we see. Vallinas says he is also examining elements of self-perception, specifically “what we believe we are, what others think we are, what we really are, and what we would like to be.”

For his latest body of work titled Roots, Vallinas again explores identity through similarly dressed boquets of flowers or plants matched with remarkably fitting attire. You can see much more on his website.

retrato-2

retrato-3

redo

retrato-5

retrato-6

retrato-7

retrato-8

retrato-9

retrato-10

See related posts on Colossal about , , , , , .

Portraits of Chinese Rockstars Imagined as Monumental Temples 

du-kun-3

Chinese artist DU Kun has long harbored a reverence for music and rockstars. A musician himself, the Beijing-based painter is awed by the creation of music, aspects of fame, and the intangible aura of being a revered rockstar, something he tries to capture is these temple-like portraits of famous Chinese recording artists titled “Revels of the Rock Gods”.

Each oil painting depicts the face of a musician as if it were a temple built in devotion to a god and borrows elements from Buddhist and Confucian architecture. Eyes are depicted as windows, tree branches or waterfalls as flowing hair, and the surface of skin as ornate wood facades gilded with gold.

Kun is currently exhibiting the “Revels of the Rock Gods” series as part of his first solo show in Japan at Mizuma Art Gallery in Tokyo through February 13, 2016. You can explore close-up details plus an archive of Kun’s work on his website. (via Hi-Fructose)

du-kun-1-new

du-kun-2-new

du-kun-4-new

du-kun-5

du-kun-6

du-kun-7

du-kun-8

du-kun-8

du-kun-9

See related posts on Colossal about , , , .

Photos of the First Flower Grown in Space 

flower-1

flower-2

As part of a new series of experiments aboard the International Space Station to study how plants grow in microgravity, astronauts have planted and cultivated an entire flower garden. This weekend, astronaut Scott Kelly tweeted a signficant step in their research: this firey zinnia bloom, the first flower grown entirely in space. Plants like lettuce have aready been grown and eaten aboard the ISS, but the VEG-01 project is meant to explore how astronauts will eventually grow more complex foods like tomatoes. (via Neatorama)

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Hypnotic New Kinetic Sculptures by Anthony Howe 

howe-1

Di-Octo. All stainless steel kinetic wind sculpture. Silent operation. 25’6″h x 10’w x 4’6″”d (7.8m h x 3m w x 1.4m d) 1,600lbs (725kg)

Artist Anthony Howe (previously) continues to amaze with his gargantuan kinetic sculptures powered by wind or motors that cycle continuously through hypnotic motions that resemble something between the tentacles of an octopus and an alien spacecraft. Weighing up to 1,600 lbs (725kg), each artwork is first built digitally to test how it will move and react to the force of wind once fabricated in the real world. Seen here are three new sculptures titled Di-Octo, In Cloud Light III, and Switchback. You can see more recent work in his portfolio.

howe-2

In Cloud III. 7.6 meter tall all stainless kinetic wind powered sculpture. Engineered for extreme high winds yet spins in 2mph. (25′ h x 10’w x 5’d, 1,500lbs), shown here not on pedestal.

howe-3

Switchback. Gear motor powered, variable speed, all stainless kinetic sculpture for interior or exterior installation. 112″h x 60″w x 34″d.

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

New-Generation Animators: Go Behind-The-Scenes With Three Animators Working by Hand 

For Colossal readers it shouldn’t be a surprise that we delight in seeing what artists and designers make with their bare hands, especially when it comes to animation. Monocle recently sat down with three top-notch animators who eschew digital animation in favor of stop-motion and other manual techniques. Go behind-the-scenes with Vera van Wolferen, Lucie Sunkova, and Daisy Jacobs (previously) as they talk about their process and animation techniques. For quick reference you can watch the films they’re working on in the interviews below.

See related posts on Colossal about , .

Dreamy Animated Light Paintings by Lucea Spinelli 

Swinger-800

NYC-based photographer Lucea Spinelli has a special appreciation for light and motion in her series of moving images titled Phōtosgraphé. She utilizes chairs, swing sets, and park benches as backdrops and props for luminous forms that seem to bounce effortlessly through the frame. In some pieces the light mimics the pathway of ghostly human figures while in others it sparkles like fireflies or expands like a rainbow. You can see more from the series here.

BellJar

Bench 650w

Book on Fire  650

Isle 650w

The Conversation sm

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Functional Shelves and Tables Built From Fallen South American Trees 

"Bilbao (Treet Shelf)," native wood, stainless steel, and glass, 150”x50”x30”

“Bilbao (Tree Shelf)”

Artist and designer Sebastian Errazuriz allows natural form to dictate his furniture design, building shelves and tables that conform to the tree structures that inspire his work. Highlighting the tree’s shape as focal point, Errazuriz keeps his designs simple, placing only thin panes of glass to add the functionality needed for shelves or tabletops. The trees he incorporates into his designs are sourced from forests in South America, readapting their fallen branches while keeping the integrity of trees’ original shape (like the root system seen in his Tree Table below).

Although Errazuriz’s designs tend to be minimal, he is also fond of adding a dash of the absurd. “It’s important to me that a project consist of just a little twist,” he said, “because I ultimately want people to see the obvious, the everyday differently.”

The Chilean artist received his Master’s in Fine Arts from New York University and is currently based in New York City. Errazuriz is represented by Cristina Grajales Gallery and Salon94. You can see more images of his work on his Facebook and Instagram. (via My Modern Met)

shelf-1

“Bilbao (Tree Shelf)”

shelf-2

Bilbao (Tree Shelf), detail

shelf-3

Bilbao (Tree Shelf), detail

shelf-4

Bilbao (Tree Shelf), detail

"Metamorphosis Shelf"

“Metamorphosis Shelf,” carved wood, 2010 , 56 3⁄4” x 127” x 14 1⁄2”, edition of 12

"Metamorphosis Shelf"

“Metamorphosis Shelf,” carved wood, 2010 , 56 3⁄4” x 127” x 14 1⁄2”, edition of 12

"The Tree Coffee Table"

“The Tree Coffee Table,” native wood, stainless steel and glass

"The Tree Coffee Table"

“The Tree Coffee Table,” native wood, stainless steel and glass

"The Tree Table"

“The Tree Table,” native wood, stainless steel, and glass, 150”x50”x30”

"The Tree Table"

“The Tree Table,” native wood, stainless steel, and glass, 150”x50”x30”

See related posts on Colossal about , , .

Page 7 of 600«...6789...»