Animation

Negative Space: A Short Film That Explores a Father-Son Relationship Through the Art of Packing

January 24, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Presented above is the trailer for the stop-motion film Negative Space, co-directed by Baltimore-based animators Max Porter and Ru Kuwahata. The short film is an adaptation of the eponymous poem by Ron Koertge, which tells the story of a relationship between a father and son through the organized art of packing. Although both directors immediately connected with the message of the poem, the piece struck a personal chord with Kuwahata whose father had worked as an airline pilot.

“I remember my dad adjusting his watch precisely before leaving the house and I remember the packing list that he pinned to the wall of his study,” Kuwahata told Variety. “My most vivid childhood memories are connected with objects, textures, and ordinary routines.”

The directors wanted to highlight these specific textures and feelings associated with everyday objects and clothing, bringing a sense of believability to each ritualized scene. Over the course of three months Porter and Kuwahata’s team fabricated each tiny sock, shirt, and belt from the original material, ensuring an idealized portrayal of the main characters’ connection and bond over perfected packing.

The film was just nominated for an Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film. You can view a behind-the-scenes peek at the making of the animated short in a video by IKKI Films below, and watch trailers for the rest of the nominees on Short of the Week.

 

 



Art Illustration

Paul Saari’s Mysterious Dreamworlds Set in Melancholy Landscapes

January 24, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Canadian oil painter Paul Saari imagines mesmerizing worlds, which he renders in pastel tones. In some works, the softness of his painting style and the candy-like colors add to the mystical, dreamlike quality of the feathery forests and twinkling skies. In others, the soft colors and brushstrokes are jarred by ominous swirling weather patterns and dark, melancholy shadows. Saari shares his work on Instagram. If you like Saari’s work, also check out Julie Heffernan. (via CrossConnect Magazine)

 

 



Art

Museum Visitors Invited to Crawl and Slide Inside Massive Suspended Tape Structure

January 23, 2018

Laura Staugaitis

Photographs by Dan Hodges and Rich Sanders

The Des Moines Art Center’s recent exhibit, Drawing in Space, highlighted four artists working in the medium of tape. The show included Numen/For Use (previously), an artist collective based in Vienna and Zagreb. Their interactive sculpture, called simply “Tape,” is made exclusively of clear packing tape, suspended within the art center’s I.M. Pei-designed architecture. Museum visitors are encouraged to explore the piece from the inside out—as long as they wear socks and move through the structure in a clockwise direction. Numen’s exhibit at the Art Center closed on January 21st, and we’re looking forward to seeing where it appears next. Previous iterations have been built in Paris, Frankfurt, and Vienna. See more of Numen/For Use’s work on their website and Facebook.

 

 



Art

New Plant-Based Embroidery and Interconnected Baskets by Ana Teresa Barboza

January 23, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Peruvian artist Ana Teresa Barboza has previously been drawn to recreating full landscapes with yarn and thread, embroidering large tapestries with rivers, valleys, and waves that spill out from the wall and rest on the floor. Barboza continues her exploration of installation-based tapestry with a new body of work that charts the growth of individual plants, while also expanding her practice into weaving with a new work of interconnected baskets.

Her series Increase charts a plant’s shadow for 15 days, steadily tracing its growth and movement over the two week time space. Balls of yarn lay at the foot of each tapestry, providing a visualization of the diminishing material as it is slowly added to the changing portrait. The colorful embroidery provides a charged glow around the white space of the original plant, its increasing mass illustrated in a collage of jagged shapes and vibrant hues.

Barboza’s new work United Baskets, retreats from color altogether, instead focusing on process and shape. The piece is a collection of seven interconnected baskets, which took the artist 30 days to weave from bundles of Huacho reed. The series of vessels vary in size and position, yet are each seamlessly linked throughout the full 10 by 10 foot composition.

Although Barboza now works with textiles, she previously studied painting at Lima’s Pontifical Catholic University. You can see more of her embroidered and woven installations on her website here.

 

 



Art Craft

Carved and Embroidered Leaves by Hillary Fayle

January 22, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist Hillary Fayle (previously here and here) slices and stitches patterns into found leaves, producing elegant designs that strike a delicate balance between natural specimens and the human hand. The works range from minimal tweaks to individual leaves to more involved patterns that link several in one embroidery. Fayle hopes each piece is an encouragement to look at nature a little closer and consider the potential for harmony in objects often overlooked.

“I want to salvage and revive our connection to the natural world,” explains Fayle in an artist statement on her website.  “…Both tender and ruthless, this intricate and sensitive work implies that our relationship to nature is both tenuously fragile and infinitely complex.”

You can see more of Fayle’s leaf embroidery, as well as some new experiments with snake scales, on her Instagram and website.

 

 



Art Food Photography

Foods Distorted Through Liquid and Glass in Photographs by Suzanne Saroff

January 22, 2018

Christopher Jobson

All photos © Suzanne Saroff.

In her ongoing series titled Perspective, photographer Suzanne Saroff creates fractured and skewed images of common foods as seen through vessels filled with water and glass objects. The images play with concepts of light and shadow resulting in distorted still lifes that appear almost like digital glitches. “With tools and techniques such as refraction, directional light, and bold colors, my photographs give everyday items alternate visual avenues of expression,” shares Saroff. “Taking shape via shadows or fragmentations, my subjects often become more than the singular and expected version of themselves.”

Saroff was born Missoula, Montana and now lives and works in New York where she shoots for a variety of brands. You can follow more of her photography on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

 

 



Art

Walk Inside a Warehouse-Sized Kaleidoscopic Painting by Katharina Grosse

January 19, 2018

Kate Sierzputowski

The newest work by German artist Katharina Grosse encompasses an entire warehouse, transforming its raw interior into a soft maze of kaleidoscopic color. The installation, titled The Horse Trotted Another Couple of Metres, Then it Stopped, responds to the architecture of Sydney’s contemporary art center Carriageworks, filling the industrial space with nearly 90,000 square feet of painted fabric.

“I was fascinated by the thought of folding space,” explained Grosse in a statement about the work. “I was interested in taking this vast surface and shrinking it by folding or, actually, hiding the entirety of what’s there. I understand a painting as something that, as we view it, travels through us and realigns our connections with the world.”

To produce the piece Grosse first suspended the multitude of fabric from Carriageworks’ ceiling, creating a series of drapes and folds. The artist then used a spray gun to paint the work in a series of gestural strokes, creating an immersive site-specific environment that obscures the historic building’s architecture in a dense mass of swirling color.

The work was mounted as a part of Sydney Festival 2018, and is on view through April 8, 2018. You can view more of Grosse’s large-scale paintings (including this 2016 in situ installation at Rockaway Beach) on her website.  (via Juxtapoz)