A Sprawling Coral-Like Structure Suspended Above an Orlando Convention Center by Marc Fornes 

All photos © Marc Fornes / The Very Many

An interconnected pathway of tubular branches hangs above the Orange County Convention Center (OCCC) in Orlando, Florida, an installation produced from perforated aluminum by architect Marc Fornes and his studio The Very ManyUnder Magnitude, which appears like a large segment of bleached coral, is composed of over 4,600 strips of metal, each just a millimeter thick. When formed into tubes however, the material increases in strength, allowing it to be walked over without damage.

This installation is suspended from the OCCC’s atrium to create a sort of secondary ceiling, its white surface highlighted by the windows that surround it. Passersby can view the work from both above and below, allowing the hollow structure to be seen from multiple vantage points.

“Borrowing and mismatching elements from the world, pushing them out of scale and hybridising them to the realm of the bizarre, the structure achieves a familiar yet mysterious quality, at once friendly and alien,” said The Very Many in Dezeen.

Under Magnitude is based on a previous nonlinear structure titled nonLin/Lin Pavilion installed at the FRAC Centre in Orleans, France by Fornes and his studio in 2011. You can see more projects by the art+architectural studio on their website, and view a behind-the-scenes video of Under Magnitude below. (via NOTCOT, Dezeen)

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Artist Windy Chien Unearths Obscure Knots Everyday for an Entire Year 

In January of 2016, artist Windy Chien devoted herself to learning a new knot every day for a year, tying a total of 366 by December 31st (2016 was a leap year). Although 366 knots might seem like a staggering number, it is nothing compared to the 3,900 included in Chien’s go-to knot manual—The Ashley Book of Knots, which took its author nearly 11 years to compile.

The daily ritual was both meditative and informative for the Apple project manager turned artist, allowing Chien to access an energetic flow, while also giving her a chance for constant experimentation with line and form. You can see a selection of Chien’s knots on her website, and view the entirety of the project on Instagram. (via Wired)

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Colorful Paper Village Installations for Hermes by Zim & Zou 

Papercraft duo Zim & Zou (previously) are back at it with one of their most grandiose installations yet for Hermès in Dubai. Each piece is a miniature paper village populated with tiny characters, one centered around towers of fungi, the other based around blooming lotus flowers. Lucie Thomas and Thibault Zimmermann, the names behind Zim & Zou, specialize in designing and building installations out of tangible materials for advertising, product display, and as part of personal artistic pursuits. You can follow more of their recent work on Instagram and Behance.

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Observe the Aurora Borealis From Snøhetta’s Swedish Treetop Cabin 

Gazing up, the first thing you notice when viewing the 33-foot tall cabin, The 7th Room, is its base, an aluminum covering featuring black and white images of the pine trees that surround the structure. Used as camouflage, this exterior panel immerses the treetop cabin into its environment, blurring the boundaries between the building and forest. Designed by architecture firm Snøhetta, the structure is also intended to bring visitors closer to nature, built with a suspended net at its center, and several floor-to-ceiling windows that allow for multiple viewpoints of the Aurora Borealis overhead.

The 7th Room is one of seven cabins available through northern Sweden’s Treehotel. You can view the other six cabins that compose the alternative hotel, like The Mirror Cube, on their website. (via Designboom)

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Anatomical Sculptures by Claude-Olivier Guay Transform to Reveal Intricate Wire Creatures 

At the outset, these sculptures by artist Claude-Olivier Guay appear like a jumble of wire and feathers folded into a heap, but each hides a remarkable secret. Working only with a pair of pliers, Guay folds, bends, and twists an inner framework of hidden creatures that dramatically transform with a bit of manual manipulation. In his 2015 piece titled La Tanière the bust of a woman’s figure turns completely into an angry wolf, or the figure of a man’s head bursts into a cloud of 40 locusts in a piece called Cénotaphe.

Guay studied visual arts at the Université du Québec à Montréal and is currently based in Québec City. You can see several more works on his website. (via Colossal Submissions, thnx Virginia!)

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New Geometric Paper Sculptures from Matthew Shlian 

Ara 211, 2016, Paper, 48 x 83 x 6 in.

Paper artist Matthew Shlian (previously here and here) combines his talent for sculpture with a knack for engineering, producing geometric works that are composed of tight-knit tessellations. Shlian’s receptively folded works have lead to collaborations with scientists at the University of Michigan, together working to visualize research by translating paper structures to micro folds.

“Researchers see paper engineering as a metaphor for scientific principals; I see their inquiry as a basis for artistic inspiration,” said Shlian in an artist statement on his website. “In my studio I am a collaborator, explorer and inventor. I begin with a system of folding and at a particular moment the material takes over.”

Shlian’s solo exhibition TELEMETRY, which explores the intersection between science and art, opens this Thursday at Florida Gulf Coast University and runs through March 2, 2017. You can see more of his intricately folded work on his Instagram and Facebook.

“Unlean Against Our Hearts,” 2011. Sculpture at the C.S. Mott Children’s Hospital in Ann Arbor. Collaboration with Bob Stack.

Recursive, 2016. (work in progress) 42 x 84 x 12″

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