New Murals by ‘1010’ Expose Hidden Portals of Color in Walls and Buildings

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Installatoin view, Limbus. Hashimoto Contemporary

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Over the last year or so, German street artist 1010 (previously) created several of his fantastic spray paint portals in locations around Germany, Panama, and the United States. 1010 brings surprising layers of depth to drab facades and blank gallery walls by painting concentric layers of color. The artist most recently had a solo show at Hashimoto Contemporary in San Francisco titled Limbus. You can see more over on Juxtapoz and on Facebook.

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A Flock of Synchronized Dancing Origami Cranes on an Electromagnetic Stage

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Not content with boring old inanimate origami, Japanese designer and maker Ugoita T. assembled this clever electromagnetic stage to bring his paper cranes to life. While the idea of moving paper creations around with magnets is fun, it’s the synchronization that really makes this hilarious. (via Digg)

Sprawling Paper Nervous Systems Cut into Repurposed Books by Barbara Wildenboer

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Barbara Wildenboer produces sculptures pieced together from delicately cut books, thin strips of paper splaying out from each book’s spine. Wildenboer’s found books are often ones containing maps, atlases, and scientific subject matter, sometimes using images from the book as central elements to her pieces. Imagery, words, and sentences become components of the larger designs, as she crafts new visual narratives from the raw material.

By producing visual metaphors, Wildenboer attempts to capture her own wonder of complex systems in nature like fractal geometry and the interconnectedness of all beings. She works across several academic disciplines to showcase how our understanding of life is often mediated through text, stretching the world of each book she manipulates outside of its own cover.

Wildenboer lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa, where she received her Masters in Fine Art from the Michaelis School of Art at the University of Cape Town in 2007. Her latest body of work, “The Lotus Eaters“, toured South Africa after opening at The Reservoir at the Oliewenhuis Art Museum in Bloemfontein in 2014. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Edible Growth: 3D-Printed Living Food That Grows before You Eat It

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Photo by Bart van Overbeeke

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3D-printed nylon prototype

Edible Growth is an ongoing project by Eindhoven-based food designer Chloé Rutzerveld that blends food, gardening, and 3d printing. The concept involves a specially printed outer casing made from dough that contains “edible soil” and various seeds. Once printed, it takes a few days for the seeds and mushrooms to germinate after which they start to poke out of the small holes on top. All that’s left to do is pop it in your mouth. Rutzerveld’s design is currently just a concept and would involve several years of research, namely around 3d printing technology and issues of food safety. Regardless, it seems like the rest of the project would be fun just to try at home for the sake of novelty. You can read more about Edible Growth on Rutzerveld’s website. (via Dezeen)

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Designers Construct Crayon-Inspired Looks for New York City Bloomingdale’s

"Unmellow Yellow" by Nanette Lepore

“Unmellow Yellow” by Nanette Lepore

For spring 2015, Bloomingdale’s reached out to several designers to create pieces that both matched and were constructed by iconic Crayola colors. The pieces are designed with playful colors, yet have a sharp edge, the points of the crayons adding 3D elements to many of the elaborate pieces. The most dynamic, a bright yellow dress designed by Nanette Lepore, showcases a bustier of organized pinwheel crayon segments extending from the ornate neckline.

Other designers chosen were Rebecca Taylor, Clover Canyon, Rebecca Minkoff, Torn by Ronny Kobo, and Parker. Parker added a creative spin to the project, incorporating the Jungle Green crayon wrappers as faux-fabric within their designed romper. Designers Derek Farrar and Laurieanne Gilner explained that not only was the piece environmentally sound, but also gave them a serious case of spring fever.

The pieces, photographed by Matthew Carasella, are currently on display at the 59th Street Bloomingdale’s location in New York City, and more detailed shots can be found on Carasella’s portfolio site here. (via Laughing Squid)

Update: It should also be noted that another artist, Herb Williams (previously), has been creating similar Crayon fashions since 2007.

"Unmellow Yellow" by Nanette Lepore

“Unmellow Yellow” by Nanette Lepore

"Bittersweet" by Torn by Ronny Kobo

“Bittersweet” by Torn by Ronny Kobo

"Clover Canyon" by Mountain Meadow

“Clover Canyon” by Mountain Meadow

"Midnight Blue" by Rebecca Taylor

“Midnight Blue” by Rebecca Taylor

"Banana Mania" by Rebecca Minkoff

“Banana Mania” by Rebecca Minkoff

"Banana Mania" by Rebecca Minkoff

“Banana Mania” by Rebecca Minkoff

"Jungle Green" by Parker

“Jungle Green” by Parker

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Giant Freezing Waves Infused with Ice Slowly Roll in off the Coast of Nantucket

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

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Photo © Jonathan Nimerfroh

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Earlier this week photographer Jonathan Nimerfroh was walking along the coast of Nantucket when he noticed something odd about the waves crashing on shore. The high temperature was 19°F (-7.2°C) and while the waves weren’t completely frozen, they were thick with pieces of ice, much like the consistency of a Slurpee, or an slushy, or an ICEE, or whatever. It’s amazing to see how the ice changes the form and color of the waves, making them seem almost solid. You can see a few more shots over on Stay Wild Magazine. You can follow more of Nimerfroh’s photography on Instagram. (thnx, Amber!)

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Kaboom! A Couple Falls in Love While Skydiving and Spends the Next 30 Years Creating Pyrotechnic Shows

For their latest Op-Doc, the New York Times traveled to El Salvador where they caught up with Rich and Dee Gibson, an unusual couple who have spent their entire relationship literally playing with fire. Sparks first flew when the couple met while skydiving. Rich (a Vietnam vet) was the pilot and Dee (formerly employed by the Army Corps of Engineers) was jumping. By 1981 they founded a pyrotechnic business out of Rockford, Illinois and for the next three decades designed orchestrated explosions for air shows.

If the story of the Gibson’s relationship isn’t enough, watch the short documentary above to see what extraordinary passion and love for your craft looks like. The Gibsons mention that in 30 years in the business “no spectator, crewmember, or volunteer has been hurt or injured.” You can read a bit more over on the New York Times.

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