Art Design Photography

The Secret Life of the Pencil: An Abstract Portrait Series of Today’s Creatives as Seen Through Their Pencils

November 8, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Celia Birtwell

Photographer Mike Tinney and industrial designer Alex Hammond were discussing the current state of technology and creativity when they had an observation: with enormous advances in technology, client demands for speed and quick turnaround often venture into the unreasonable leaving precious little time for thinking, sketching, or ideation. Despite advancements in software, the duo found that pencils remained central to their own process of formulating ideas and began to wonder if this held through across creative industries.

“The pencil and its ability to bridge the gap between hand and paper so effectively makes it exceptionally powerful, and as we’ve found, still much loved amongst the creative heroes of our generation,” shares Hammond. As they reached out to other established artists, designers, and photographers they began to request writing utensils to photograph using a special setup. “For each pencil we art directed the shoot to have a very subtle ‘nod’ to them or their work. When that wasn’t suitable, we let the pencil they had chosen to represent them talk for itself, documenting them in their purest form.”

Tinney and Hammond gathered the pencil portraits together in the new book The Secret Life of the Pencil available worldwide through Laurence King.

William Boyd

Dave Eggers

Tracey Emin

Thomas Heatherwick

Henry Holland

Anish Kapoor

Nick Park

Gerald Scarfe

David Shrigley

 

 



Art

An Oakland-Based Graffiti Camp That’s Just For Girls

November 8, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Artist, muralist, printmaker, and educator Nina Wright, also known as Girl Mobb, started creating graffiti as a teenager in her hometown in rural Ohio. She found a community of street artists when she moved to Oakland, CA, but struggled to find a segment of women making similar work. Each time she was curated into an all-woman exhibition, the same 5-6 artists were also selected. This lack of female presence prompted Wright to start a mentorship program, an attempt to increase the number of female artists creating street art in the Bay Area.

Wright hosted her first session of Graffiti Camp for Girls in April of this year. The camp was created for young women ages 12-17, and is based on a sliding-scale tuition. Participants learn how to properly use aerosol paints, take the requisite safety precautions, and efficiently collaborate. At the end of each session a large-scale mural is planned, designed, and organized by the young women themselves.

Each of Wright’s four sessions has filled up quickly, and she’s been asked to extend the camp to cities that lay outside of the Bay Area. The street artist hopes that with a growing base of volunteer mentors the program will help to correct the gender imbalance seen in Oakland’s street art scene and beyond. You can keep updated about future sessions of Graffiti Camp for Girls on the program’s website, and view more of the work made by Wright and camp participants on her Instagram. (via Creators Project)

 

 



Art Craft

New Paper & Textile Wildlife Sculptures by Kate Kato

November 7, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Botanical paper artist Kate Kato (previously) continues to use found and recycled paper to build intricate natural dioramas. A buzzing hive of bees makes a home in a matchbox, vintage books are overgrown with paper fungi and colorful wildflowers, and a shadow box is filled with butterflies and beetles. Rather than striving for exact scientific replication, Kato allows the original material to show through, lending a spirit of handcrafted whimsy to her work. Some of the pieces seen here can be purchased through Etsy, and you can explore more of the Wales-based artist’s work on Facebook, and Instagram.

 

 



Art History

Watch as a 17th Century Portrait Emerges From 200 Years of Discolored Varnish

November 7, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

Art historian, dealer, and BBC television host Philip Mould recently posted a video to his Twitter that reveals a gleaming 17th century painting hiding underneath two centuries of yellowed varnish. The protective finish is applied to protect paintings from wear, but over time will begin to discolor. In the short video Mould gently paints a solvent to remove this layer from the work’s surface, slowly brushing it away in circular strokes.

The only details known about the mysterious lady in red is from an inscription on the painting that notes she was 36 when the work was completed in 1618. You can watch Mould remove the last bits of varnish from the subject’s face in the short clip below, and follow more of his painting adventures on Twitter. (via Twisted Sifter)

 

 



Animation

Wiggly Noodle People Appear to Disintegrate in a Bizarre New Animation by Ari Weinkle

November 6, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Boston-based digital artist and designer Ari Weinkle reflects on the physical effects of negative emotions in a new experimental video that shows human forms imploding, melting, morphing, and disappearing. Titled ‘Moodles,’ and set to a backdrop of electronic music, the short video features a series of anonymous solitary figures constructed out of ombre strands. The strands initially follow the body’s contour lines but quickly squiggle into piles, sink holes, or walls.

Weinkle writes about the project:

Moodles is a short animation based on the effects of negative emotions on one’s self. It turns built up tension, stress, and anxiety into creative catharsis. Frozen figures – once paralyzed by moods – are reduced to heaps of flexible nothingness.

You can see more of the artist’s work on Behance and Instagram.

 

 



Sponsor

Hand-Lettered Art from Skylar Yoo Inspires and Empowers Women (Sponsor)

November 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Skylar Yoo is a new company dedicated to inspiring and empowering women. Alice Yoo, the former editor-in-chief of the art blog My Modern Met, founded the company after discovering the beauty of hand lettering. She paired the unique artform with meaningful words and phrases inspired in part by the Women’s March last January, an event that saw five million people advocate for women’s rights in 700 marches worldwide. Deeply impacted by the global demonstration, Yoo feels that women have a story that needs to be told.

As part of the launch, Yoo collaborated with 14 hand lettering artists including German illustrator Tobias Saul. When asked how he sees hand lettering differing from other forms of art, Tobias shares:

For me, hand lettering combines three different fields: type design, illustration, and graphic design. You have to know a lot of different type styles and how they are constructed. Additionally, you need drawing skills to bring them to paper. And, you have to be able to create different layouts and work with colors. This symbiosis of different graphic fields makes hand lettering so fascinating to me.

Tobias produced this quick timelapse video of his creation process, from start to finish. You can buy his artwork, in the form of t-shirts or art prints at Skylar Yoo, as well as enamel pins and temporary tattoos.

Below are some of the artworks, made by Tobias Saul and others, found exclusively at Skylar Yoo.

 

 



Art

New Painted Mandalas Gilded with Gold Leaf by Artist Asmahan Rose Mosleh

November 6, 2017

Christopher Jobson

Yemeni artist Asmahan A. Mosleh (previously) continues to paint stunning acrylic mandala works infused with gold leaf accents. The meditative pieces take days to complete with upward of 80 hours spent on an individual painting. The UK-based artist shares process videos and completed works on her Instagram.