Amazing Photography

A 30-Day Timelapse Transports You Across the Globe Aboard a Container Ship

September 12, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski


Jeffrey Tsang is a maritime vlogger, sailor, and photographer on a container ship that travels across the globe. His latest video is a timelapse that captures 30 days of the barge’s journey, tracing its path from the Red Sea all the way to Hong Kong. The 4K video is composed of nearly 80,000 photos which capture breathtaking views of quickly shifting skies, deep red sunsets, and brilliant blue lightening amidst ferocious storms.

“Sailing in the open sea is a truly unique way to grasp how significantly small we are in the beautiful world,” says the Canadian photographer. “Chasing the endless horizon, witnessing the ever changing weather, and appreciating the bright stars and galaxies.”

We highly recommend you watch the video in full screen, a viewing experience that transports you directly to the bow of the globe-trotting ship. You can see more of Tsang’s maritime photography on his Instagram and Youtube. (via Coudal)

 

 



Art Design

A Towering 4-Story Organic Structure Built From Material as Thin as a Coin

September 12, 2017

Christopher Jobson

All photographs © NAARO

Minima | Maxima is the latest creation from Marc Fornes / THEVERYMANY, known for their innovative fusion of computational design and architecture to build organic self-supporting structures. This new piece was commissioned by World Expo 2017 and now stands as a permanent structure on the grounds in Astana, Kazakhstan. Despite its impressive height of 43′ feet (13.1 meters), the core material used to build Minima | Maxima are 2mm strips of aluminum. From their project statement:

Minima | Maxima evolves the studio’s invention of ‘Structural Stripes’ — a signature material system for building self-supporting curvilinear structures — with a step in a direction that offers even more structural potential: multi-ply composite. Three layers of flat stripes — white and white sandwiching pink — are constructed in tandem, supporting one another as they assume curvature and gain height. One layer never exists independently, but contributes to and benefits from the unified whole as it is built.

The system warrants comparison to fiber technology — such as carbon or glass fiber — yet is unique in that unlike fibers, each individual component does not need to be in tension (a straight line), and/or their processing does not require any mold or temporary scaffolding. Also such a composite system is mechanically bonded, allowing for recomposition and corrections during construction.

You can see how the structure was assembled in the video below, and explore more work by THEVERYMANY on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Michael Pederson’s Lighthearted Street Art is Hidden in Plain Sight

September 11, 2017

Laura Staugaitis

Using the nom de guerre Miguel Marquez Outside, Michael Pederson (previously here and here) tucks art installations in unexpected locations around Sydney. The artist’s plaques, signs, and miniature architecture tend to center around ideas of escape, isolation, and our relationship to social norms. But he approaches these heavy subjects with a a sense of humor and brings a lighthearted pseudohistory to various structures and spaces. And if Pederson’s shovel piece, shown below, has you wondering, you can use this site to find out what location is on the opposite side of the world from you. See more of the artist’s work on Instagram.

 

 

 



Sponsor

Innovative Textiles MFA Program at Parsons School of Design Cultivates Creative Change Makers (Sponsor)

September 11, 2017

Colossal

Can algorithms become textiles? Can local making spur global sustainability? Do smart fabrics make for intelligently designed businesses? Questions like these inspired Lidewij Edelkoort, international trend forecaster and The New School’s dean of Hybrid Studies, to establish the MFA in Textiles, a groundbreaking master’s program at Parsons School of Design — part of The New School in New York City.

Launching in fall 2018, the MFA program is designed to prepare creative leaders for the broadening range of textile applications, including fashion and wearable tech, auto and aerospace industries, heath care, and interiors and architecture. “The good news for textile education is that there is an enormous number of jobs,” says Edelkoort. “You can work for a fashion house designing new fabrics. There is the idea of constructing environments, by knitting buildings and creating tent-like structures, using fiber to regulate temperature. All these things come together, from the smallest bit of embroidery to an enormous built environment.”

The recent proliferation of new materials is bringing together makers, designers, and scholars to reimagine textiles — from locally created materials to 3D-knitted and biofabricated matter. In Parsons’ two-year, 60-credit full-time program, students join working professionals in developing a critical understanding of textiles’ sociocultural, environmental, and emotional dimensions and considering their unlimited potential to unite traditional techniques with cutting-edge technologies.

Entrepreneurship-focused coursework and projects are also interwoven throughout the MFA Textiles curriculum. The program is geared to help students re-shore textile industries, lend studio skills to a wide array of firms, launch an independent enterprise, or pursue advanced studies. “We would like to make a hybrid of the Hudson Valley and Silicon Valley,” says Edelkoort. “We integrate computing into our textiles in an intimate way to bring production close to home, to give the machine to the hand, and hand to the machine.”

 

 



Art Dance Design

A Concept Dance Performance Incorporating a Plane of 640 Motorized LED Spheres

September 11, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

2047 Apologue is a concept performance by Chinese director Zhang Yimou, the director of the opening and closing ceremonies for the 2008 Beijing Olympics. The video is a teaser for the final part of the show titled the Weaving Machine, one of eight acts that combine traditional Chinese craft, music, or dance with modern technology such as lasers, robots, and drones. The combination of ancient and modern technology aims to comment on how much the later has taken over life in the 21st century.

For this particular segment Zhang places an ancient Chinese weaving machine on stage with 640 kinetic LED spheres designed and produced by WHITEvoid. Moving together in an elegant wave, the lights interact with a dancer performing underneath. Throughout the segment the lights change both pattern and color, as a soundtrack matches their increasing energy and movement.

The performance premiered at the National Center for the Performing Arts in Beijing this past June and will tour China throughout 2018.  You can see the full teaser video for the Weaving Machine above. (via Prosthetic Knowledge)

 

 



Amazing Illustration

Lovingly Animated Woodland Scenes by Alexandra Dvornikova

September 11, 2017

Christopher Jobson

London-based illustrator Alexandra Dvornikova animates enchanting moments in darkened woods, where fluorescent fungi flickers in the night and woodland creatures carry candles on their heads. Dvornikova shares more of her storybook images on Instagram and also sells prints through Society6.

 

 



Design Science

Discover What the Solar System Looked Like on the Exact Day of Your Birth

September 8, 2017

Kate Sierzputowski

The solar system is in constant rotation, a notion that has taken us generations to understand, and just as long to track. This knowledge has impacted our understanding of time, mathematics, science, and religion, yet the universe is still one of our greatest mysteries. SpaceTime Coordinates brings a personalized depiction to the great expanse of space by calculating the exact position of the planets on the day of your birth.

Using NASA data and algorithms, the company computes the positions of the planets and dwarf planets to create custom prints that correspond with your unique position in the universe. No two dates provide the same planetary map.

“On any given date, the Solar System was organized in a singularly unique way – differently than any other day in history,” says founders govy and Martin Vézina. “Our mission is to provide you with the actual snapshot of the Solar System that corresponds to your most special day.”

Previously the company has created 3D-printed mementos cast in metal that display your planetary information. Now, the company has created minimal posters in dark blue, black, and white, and is currently seeking funding on Kickstarter as part of the website’s Projects of Earth series. You can view more samples of SpaceTime Coordinates’ designs on their website.