Spiraling Coral Reefs Assembled from Precisely Cut Wood by Joshua Abarbanel 

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LA-based sculptor Joshua Abarbanel fabricates wood sculptures and installations reminiscent of coral reefs comprised of concentric flower-like blooms. The artist builds both smaller standalone artworks that rest on a pedestal and larger wall or ceiling-mounted pieces that seem to grow organically in every direction. Each piece first takes shape on a computer before being cut from assorted woods with the aid of a laser cutter. From Abarbanel’s artists statement:

Finding inspiration in fractals, accretive formations, and the Fibonacci sequence, Abarbanel creates art that often simultaneously evokes microscopic and aerial perspectives, such that the compositions serve as metaphors for archetypal relationships between people, between individuals and communities, and between humankind and the planet. His work also illustrates how disparate parts can come together to make a whole in beautiful and startling ways.

Abarbanel recently opened an exhibition of work at Porch Gallery in Ojai, California through May 29, 2016. (via Hi-Fructose)

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Surreal Photo Manipulations by Laurent Rosset Turn Landscapes into Giant Waves 

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Architect and digital artist Laurent Rosset creates sweeping photographic landscapes that seem to curl upward into infinity like an enormous wave that obliterates the sky. Rosset uses much of his own photography to create each image and enjoys discovering how even slight manipulations can vastly change the composition or meaning of a photograph. You can see more of his work on Instagram, and if you liked this also check out Aydin Buyuktas. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Ancient Skeleton Mosaic Uncovered in Turkey Reads “Be Cheerful and Live Your Life” 

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Archaeologists in Turkey recently unearthed an exceptionally preserved mosaic inside the remains of a building from the 3rd century. One section of the three-panel artwork includes a reclining skeleton with an arm over its head, holding a glass of wine and resting an elbow on a loaf of bread. On both sides of its head reads the phrase “Be cheerful and live your life,” written in Greek. The purpose of the building surrounding the mosaic, and even when it was made is currently being debated. Some experts believe the triptych was simply the floor of a wealthy person who could afford to have it built, while others think it might be a message in a soup kitchen urging people to get their food quickly and leave. The History Blog has a great analysis and quite a bit more background if you’re interested. (via The History Blog)

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Artist Mimics Japanese ‘Kintsugi’ Technique to Repair Broken Vases with Embroidery 

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Brighton-based artist Charlotte Bailey was fascinated by the traditional Japanese mending technique called kintsugi, where a broken ceramic object is repaired with gold, silver or platinum, to accentuate the damage and ‘honor’ its history. In this interpretation, Bailey utilizes an embroidery method to reassemble a broken vase—a sort of hybrid between kintsugi and darning with a beautiful result. She first wraps each broken piece in fabric and then uses gold metallic thread to painstakingly patchwork the pieces together. While the process isn’t meant to make the vase functional again, it does produce a striking sculptural object. We’d love to see many more of these. You can follow more of her embroidery work on Facebook.

Update: Artist Zoe Hillyard has been using a similar technique to create ceramic patchwork since 2010.

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Amorphous Technicolor Blobs That Appear to Ooze From Gallery Shelves by Dan Lam 

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All images via Dan Lam

Covered in tiny, multicolored spikes of acrylic paint, Dan Lam's oozing sculptures seem nearly radioactive, glowing as if lit by some unnatural source. The pieces are intended to sit at the edge of a ledge or against a wall, appearing to be pulled by gravity towards the earth. To create these alien-like beings Lam uses polyurethane foam and epoxy resin as a base. Letting the foam grow on its own, she guides the form only slightly, letting drips happen organically.

Lam produced the series as a part of a continued study of beauty and disgust—dually attracting and repelling those that come in contact with her sculptures. “I take cues from nature, food, and the human body,” Lam told The Creator’s Project. “By not directly referencing one thing in particular, I try to create something that addresses both attraction and repulsion, making objects that exist in-between.”

You can see more of Lam’s neon spiked sculptures and drippy forms on her Instagram. (via Booooooom)

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Snowy Mountains and Undersea Worlds Encapsulated Within Wood and Resin Rings 

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Formed from wood, resin, and beeswax, Canadian jeweler Secret Wood forms tiny worlds within the space of a finger. These environments contain everything from snowcapped mountains to deep blue lagoons, appearing like tiny snow globes atop one’s hand. Like a gemstone, each ring has an angular surface, refracting the scenes carefully placed within. Every piece is completely handmade, ensuring that no two rings are exactly alike. You can see more of the jeweler’s rings on their online store and Facebook. (via My Modern Met)

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