Tag Archives: anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self-Portrait by Joshua Harker

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Anatomical 3D Self Portrait by Joshua Harker sculpture portraits anatomy

Chicago-based artist Joshua Harker recently unveiled this 3D-printed sculptural self-portrait titled 21st Century Self-Portrait. Harker utilized a 3D scan of his face and a CT scan of his skull to form the components which were coupled with his trademark filigree aesthetic found in some of his other artworks (you might remember his Crania Anatomica Filigre project a while back, a piece now in his shop). 21st Century Self-Portrait was first shown at 3D Printshow in New York back in February. If you’re interested, Harker is now making custom printed masks based on your own 3D facial scan. (via Street Anatomy, Laughing Squid)

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Anatomical Collages by Travis Bedel mixed media collage anatomy

Mixed media artist Travis Bedel creates stunning collages that merge anatomical imagery with illustrations from science guides and textbooks. You can see much more of his work over on Tumblr, and he has prints for sale on Society6 and Etsy.

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Dollface: Bizarre Portraits Made from Repurposed Toy Parts by Freya Jobbins toys sculpture assemblage anatomy

Using dismembered plastic parts from old dolls and other toys, artist Freya Jobbins assembles these exceedingly strange portraits of people and pop culture icons. Chances are when viewing these you fall firmly into one of two camps: the highly amused or the highly disturbed. Regardless, it’s hard to deny the incredible amount of labor that goes into each piece, from the exploration of form and the use of color to make each anatomical amalgamation.

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa and raised in West Sydney, Jobbins is influenced in part by Guiseppe Archimboldo’s fruit and vegetable paintings as well as Ron Mueck’s oversized humans. I first encountered Jobbins’ work close-up at the Toy Cycle exhibition in Tel Aviv back in December courtesy of Kinetis, and despite the mild case of heebie-jeebies it was impossible to look away as I tried to figure out how each piece came together.

You can see more freaky faces over in Jobbin’s online gallery and on Facebook. (via Juxtapoz, FastCo)

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France snakes sculpture France bones anatomy
Emmanuel Le Guellec

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France snakes sculpture France bones anatomy
Philippe Cabaret

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France snakes sculpture France bones anatomy
Nantes Tourisme

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France snakes sculpture France bones anatomy
Kamel Mennour, photo by Gino Maccarinelli

A Giant Twisting Serpent Skeleton Emerges from the Loire River in France snakes sculpture France bones anatomy
via Flickr

Completed in 2012, Serpent d’océan is a giant aluminum sea serpent skeleton by artist Huang Yong Ping (previously) situated off the shore of the Loire River where it empties into the Bay of Biscay just outside of Nantes, France. Measuring nearly 425 feet (130 meters) in length the curving skeleton mirrors the curves of the nearby Saint-Nazaire bridge and was created as a permanent work for the final Estuaire contemporary art exhibition in 2012. Via Nantes Tourisme:

By having a major figure from Chinese mythology appear on European shores, Huang Yong Ping examines, the notions of identity and cultural hybridity, as is often the case in his work. The environmental question is also very present in his art where he regularly exposes the paradox of the man sawing the branch he is sitting on, torn between creative abilities and destructive impulses. This is one of the many possible interpretations of this work: placed on the beach, the skeleton appears with the tide and, little by little, will be home to marine fauna and flora.

Depending on weather conditions, tide levels, or the perspective of a photographer, Serpent d’océan appears dramatically different from day to day, a phenomenon you can witness over on Flickr. (via Beautiful Decay)

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

About two years we featured a great selection of skull nickels, a numismatic curiosity where miniature bas relief sculptures are carved into coins, an artform that’s broadly referred to as hobo nickel art. While researching a follow-up article on Hobonickelart.com I stumbled onto the work of Paolo Curcio (aka “mrthe”) who appears to have taken the process of carving coins to an entirely new level. Using a variety of different coins the Barcelona-based artist creates etched homages to pop culture, illustrations of figures from literature, and most commonly: macabre portraits of skulls and death, probably the most prevalent theme in hobo nickel art.

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

Remarkable Hobo Nickels Carved from Clad Coins by Paolo Curcio sculpture money faces currency bas relief anatomy

One aspect of Curcio’s process that’s really amazing is his ability to use coins made from multiple layers of metal (referred to as clad coins) which he then strategically reveals to create colored flourishes and background patterns. You can see much more of his work over on his website, and keep an eye on his Ebay page for occasional coin listings.

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Horse and Rider © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Opah © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Cheetah © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
African Elephant © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Rattlesnake © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Mandrill & Humbolt’s Wooly Monkey © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Orca © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Lemur © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
Flamingo & Water Monitor © Patrick Gries

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
© Xavier Barral

Evolution: A Stunning Monochromatic Exploration of Vertebrate Skeletons by Patrick Gries bones black and white anatomy
© Xavier Barral

Created in collaboration with the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Evolution is an extraodinary collection of images by photographer Patrick Gries that tells the visual story of evolution through 300 black and white photos of vertebrate skeletons. Unlike a textbook approach to photography, the skeletons Gries’ photos appear to have been reanimated, artfully posed and lit in lifelike scenarios resulting in images that are both beautiful and haunting.

In addition to the National Museum of Natural History in Paris, Gries acquired anatomical specimens from numerous veterinary and natural history museums throughout France and Monaco to round out the series of photos that are accompanied by passages from writer and scientist Dr. Jean-Baptiste de Panafieu. Evolution is available through Editions Xavier Barral.

All images courtesy Patrick Gries. (via Photojojo)

A Morbid New Way to Count Calories: The Sugar Skull Spoon

A Morbid New Way to Count Calories: The Sugar Skull Spoon tea sugar skulls sugar skulls food coffee anatomy

A Morbid New Way to Count Calories: The Sugar Skull Spoon tea sugar skulls sugar skulls food coffee anatomy

A Morbid New Way to Count Calories: The Sugar Skull Spoon tea sugar skulls sugar skulls food coffee anatomy

To help reinforce their assertion that sugar is evil, the designers over at Hundred Million designed this wicked Sugar Skull Spoon. Cut from stainless steel, this anatomical serving utensil serves as a morbid reminder every time you get a little scoop happy. Though even if you’re not counting calories it still beats a regular spoon. Pick it up on Kickstarter for about $13. (via Cool Material, This Isn’t Happiness)

Mesmerizingly Creepy Kaleidoscopic Fingers Filmed by Dave Razor

Mesmerizingly Creepy Kaleidoscopic Fingers Filmed by Dave Razor fingers black and white anatomy

Mesmerizingly Creepy Kaleidoscopic Fingers Filmed by Dave Razor fingers black and white anatomy