Tag Archives: anatomy

Artist Ronit Baranga’s Disturbing Anatomical Dishware Creeps Across Tabletops 

Artist Ronit Baranga (previously) creates ceramic sculptural works she describes as existing on the “border between living and still life”—objects guaranteed to either tickle your funny bone or haunt your worst nightmares, depending on your perspective. Baranga depicts dishware as sprouting human fingers and gaping mouths as the objects traipse across tabletops or physically cling to one another in a permanent embrace. The pieces are both silly and sinister as they come to life as if from a cartoon. A quick scroll through her Instagram reveals even darker works that give us the bonafide heebie-jeebies.

Ronit most recently had work on view at the Gross Anatomies show at the Akron Art Museum, and is also a contruting artist to the Small Works 2017 with beinArt Gallery through August. (via My Amp Goes to 11)

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Anatomical Cross-Sections of Human Heads Reveal a Menagerie of Found Objects 

Chicago-based artist duo Edwige Massart and Xavier Wynn (previously) sculpt cross-sections of human heads that are organized into compartments of tiny objects. The series began several years ago as an intersection of sorts involving Massart’s personal collection of found objects that she began at the age of four, and Wynn’s childhood discovery of “split body” models at Chicago’s Field Museum that inspired a lingering fascination with human anatomy. Each sculpture is given only a number (ie. Head 14) leaving the viewer to examine the compartments of objects and draw their own parallels and conclusions. You can see more recent work from the Heads series on their website. (via Colossal Submissions)

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Mimesis: New Anatomical Paintings Depicting Flora and Fauna by Nunzio Paci 

Bologna-based Italian artist Nunzio Paci (previously here and here) produces hauntingly detailed paintings that combine anatomical renderings with multi-colored blossoms and leaves. His latest series, Mimesis, is inspired by the idea of species evolving together over time, and the similarities shared by different organisms in order to better adapt to predators and climate.

“The concept, deriving from Plato and Aristotle’s theory on reality and imitation, draws inspiration from the natural phenomenon of mimicry in evolutionary biology and gives it a broader meaning,” Paci explained to Colossal. “In Mimesis, flora and fauna not only copy one another, they enmesh themselves in each other’s existence forming a cohesive organism, in an attempt to take shelter from the totality of the outside world.”

Within the series fauna helps to protect flora, creating a symbiotic relationship through the included animals’ death and rebirth. Flowers fill the hallows of presented carcasses while leaves grow to surround and overtake human skulls.

Paci recently exhibited these works as part of a solo show titled Mimesis at Galerie Stephanie in Manilla, Philippines and is currently a part of the group exhibition Dark Nature at Last Rites Gallery in New York City. You can see more of his work on Instagram and Facebook.

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Anatomical Murals of Bisected Animals by Street Artist Nychos 

Street artist Nychos paints large murals of bisected animals and humans, large works that allow you to take a peek inside their anatomical structure. These works include extremely detailed bone and vein structures, such as the Tyrannosaurus rex he painted in Oakland, California late last year. Most recently he has been on a tour through Australia where he has made stops in both Sydney and Melbourne to put up works.

Nychos opened a solo exhibition of works on paper with Juddy Roller Gallery in Melbourne during this tour titled Monochrome Organism on March 10. You can see more of his public and canvas-based paintings on his Instagram and Facebook. (via This Isn’t Happiness)

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