Tag Archives: anthropomorphic

Extremes of Human Nature Explored through Hand-Built Stoneware Animals by Beth Cavener Stichter

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Obariyon. 2013. Stoneware, antique hooks, glaze. 17 x 46 x 30″

Washington-based artist Beth Cavener Stichter sculpts human-sized animals from clay and other materials in both dramatically overt and subtly ambigous displays of emotion. Hung from ropes or pinned to walls, the anthropomorphic sculptures are infused with juxtapositions that depict the extremes of both human emotion and animalistic behavior: predator and prey, love and hate, fear and peace. “On the surface,” shares Stichter, “these figures are simply feral animals suspended in a moment of tension. Beneath the surface, they embody the consequences of human fear, apathy, aggression, and misunderstanding.”

Stichter collaborates with a variety of artists in her work, including Alessandro Gallo, who designed and painted the ornate Japanese tattoos on the nineteen-foot long anaconda snake depicted in Tangled Up in You seen below. There’s much more to see over on her website and several studio views on Hi-Fructose. All images courtesy the artist.

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Obariyon, detail.

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Obariyon, detail.

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Tangled Up in You. 2014. Stoneware, mixed media. Tattoos designed and painted by Alessandro Gallo.

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Tangled Up in You, detail.

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Tangled Up in You, detail.

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Tangled Up in You, detail.

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The Sentimental Question. 2012. Stoneware.

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L’Amante. 2012. Stoneware, painted tattoos. 45 x 60 x 44″

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L’Amante, detail.

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The Question That Devours. 2012. Stoneware.

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Living Clay: Artist Johnson Tsang Brings Ceramic Bowls and Cups to Life

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With an adept understanding of ceramics and anatomy, Hong-Kong based artist Johnson Tsang (previously here and here) creates strange and unexpected anthropomorphic sculptures where human forms seem to splash effortlessly through functional objects like bowls, plates, and cups. While the works shown here are mostly innocent and comical in nature the artist is unafraid of veering into more macabre subject matter in other artworks that grapple with war and violence.

Tsang recently opened a solo show, Living Clay, at the Yingge Ceramics Museum in Taiwan that runs through January 19, 2014. You can see many more pieces from the exhibition over on his blog where you can also catch a glimpse of works in progress.

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The @FacesPics Twitter Account Posts Fun Anthropomorphic Photos Containing Hidden Faces

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If you’re a fan of quick visual jokes, I heartily recommend following the new Twitter account @FacesPics that archives photographs of objects, buildings, and other things that look unmistakably like faces of people or animals. Launched earlier this month the account already has 162,000 followers and counting, and for good reason. Sure, some of these photos have been bouncing around for ages, but it’s good they’ve finally found a home.

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Second Skins: Fashionably Dressed Animals Photographed by Miguel Vallinas

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When first encountering this body of photographs Madrid-based advertising and industrial photographer Miguel Vallinas it’s easy to view it as a familiar “animals dressed as people” project. But as you look closer you realize it’s quite a bit more than that. Aside from the solid retouching, lighting and overall execution, Vallinas took this anthropomorphic project a bit further and imagined what the fully-realized wardrobe of each animal might look like if it were wearing human clothes.

Titled Segundas Pieles (Second Skins), the ongoing series includes some 50+ animals whose personalities seem to be perfectly amplified by their pitch-perfect attire, making the portaits just a bit more human than animal. I’m pretty sure the hipster bird in the cardigan works at a coffee shop by my house. The work is a sister project to another series called simply Pieles where the photographer portrays himself in a wide range of professions. (via lustik)

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Voices

I have no idea what’s going on here but I just laughed loud enough to startle the crap out of my poor sleeping dog. That, I believe, is justification enough to post it here. Directed by Reina Hamane of teevee graphics for Japanese music website Space Shower TV.

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Scott Beseler

Absolutely loving this series of anthropomorphic street fixtures by Scott Beseler out of Covington, Kentucky. (via wooster)

Traveling today, posting will be regrettably light.

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