Design

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Design Photography

Step Inside the Lavish Architecture of Gaudí’s Casa Vicens

June 27, 2019

Laura Staugaitis


Architectural photographer David Cardelús recently completed an assignment for the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Casa Vicens. In the grand tradition of ornate “cottages” commissioned by society’s upper class, the 1880’s home was designed and built by Antoni Gaudí for a wealthy broker, Manuel Vicens. Though the city of Barcelona has since been built up to surround Casa Vicens, at the time of its construction it was in a village known as Gràcia. The home is considered the first architectural work of note by Gaudí, and one of the pioneering buildings in Europe’s Modernism movement. It features many Islamic and Oriental architectural motifs and vibrant colors from cadmium red exterior trim to cerulean blue ceilings bring personality to every corner of the home.

Cardelús has captured Gaudí’s Casa Batlló, Gaudí Crypt, Palau Güell, and El Capricho in addition to this most recent series, and he shares with Colossal that he hopes to photograph all of the famous Catalan architect’s buildings some day. Cardelús, who was born and raised in Barcelona, studied photography, film, and video and now lectures on architectural photography at Universitat Pompeu Fabra ELISAVA.

You can see more of Cardelús’s photographs on his website and Behance, and learn more about Casa Vicens (which is now a museum) on their website. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Craft Design

Quilled Paper Sculptures by Sena Runa Embellish the Natural Forms of Everyday Objects and Animals

June 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Sena Runa (previously) twists, folds, and stacks layers of thick paper to create dynamic paper sculptures. The Turkish artist uses a wide range of hues to create chromatic elephants with a rainbow of shades, or work all of the brilliant blues of the ocean into a single sea turtle. Runa left the corporate world to make quilled paper works full-time in 2015, and wrote her own book on the topic in 2017. You can see much more of the artist’s work by following her on Instagram, and purchase one of her pieces on Etsy.

 

 



Art Design

Vintage Clothing and Found Objects Compose Decorative Masks Designed by Magnhild Kennedy

June 21, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Magnhild Kennedy, who makes work under the name Damselfrau, creates intricate headpieces and masks that are comprised of both high and lowbrow elements. The London and Oslo-based artist mixes together sequins, vintage clothing scraps, and random materials she finds on the street to compose works that expose minimal elements of the wearer’s face.

The pieces are intended to operate as both art objects and wearable sculptures, and were initially inspired by the elegant clothing seen during her days working at a London vintage shop. As a completely self-taught artist, Kennedy learns techniques as she forms new masks, trouble-shooting new methods alongside her more elaborate designs. You can see more of her wearable works on her website and Instagram.

 

 



Design Food Photography

Apples and Oranges Come Together in Photographs of Spliced Fruits by Yuni Yoshida

June 20, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The saying goes that you can’t compare apples and oranges, but Japanese art director Yuni Yoshida finds unusual ways to bring the two opposing fruits together. Yoshida has played with food in the past, creating pixelated pineapples, bananas, and even hamburgers. Forgoing digital manipulation, Yoshida used the actual ingredients to form each colorful cube. In her more recent series, Yoshida fuses various combinations of kiwis, oranges, apples, and bananas, playing with the recognizable colors and textures of each fruit’s skin as she splices them together.

In an interview with Amazon Fashion Week, Yoshida described her approach to design: “I love taking something real and letting my imagination run wild with it. When I produce something, I am not trying to do something particularly intricate, so that others take notice. I want people to think, ‘Wait, something is different’ and become inspired.”

Explore Yoshida’s recent work on Instagram and take a deeper look into her portfolio on her website.

 

 



Design

Color-Changing Dyes Illuminate Iconic Internet Acronyms and Popular Phrases

June 19, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Traditional calligraphy styles get an update with Seb Lester‘s series of contemporary words and phrases pulled from popular memes and classic web acronyms. Words like “chill” are slowly hand drawn in colorful inks which slowly change their hue and increase in sparkle as they dry on the page. Lester studied graphic design at Central Saint Martins in London and now works in East Sussex as an artist and graphic designer. The calligrapher has amassed a large online following for his daily twists on the ancient form, which you can follow on Facebook and Instagram. Make sure to watch with the sound on, as the scratching of the pen nib on paper is just as engaging as his shimmering strokes. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 

 



Design

Inventor Simone Giertz Converted Her Tesla Into… a Truckla

June 18, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Famed inventor Simone Giertz (previously) is most well-known for her devices that attempt to complete basic tasks in a comically dysfunctional manner. However, after Giertz purchased a Tesla sedan she set out to make the vehicle more functional. Because she uses lots of large supplies and tools to construct her quirky robotic machines, Giertz found that the open design of a truck bed and racks would be better suited to her lifestyle than a segmented sedan. Instead of buying a different vehicle, she transformed her Tesla into a custom truck that she has dubbed the “Truckla”.

You can watch the behind-the-scenes process video above, as well as Giertz’s parody ad for her invented vehicle (below), the tagline for which is “available nowhere”. See more of the San Francisco-based inventor’s videos, including one where she turned a piece of her radiation treatment into a lamp, on YouTube and Twitter.

 

 



Design

Empowering Messages and Site-Specific City Names Grown from Salt Crystals and Succulents by Danielle Evans

June 18, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Columbus, Ohio-based typographer Danielle Evans uses her studio as a garden and lab. Previously she has planted hundreds of shrubs and succulents to spell messages of kindness, and grown text-shaped crystals as an ode to poet Nayyirah Waheed’s book of poems titled Salt. Recently while in Reykjavik, the designer arranged ice lettering around the city and the southern Golden Circle as a way to experiment with typography and the variables in Iceland’s topography. You can see more of Evans’s experiments with paper, lemons, dirt, jello, and more on her website, Instagram, and Behance.