Design Illustration

Woodblock-Printed Matchboxes Light up with Canine Personalities

July 11, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

As a follow-up to last year’s wildly successful woodblock-printed matchboxes featuring the questionable decisions of tipsy cats, Ravi Zupa has just released a set of canine designs. Comprised of ten designs, the set includes a Boston Terrier with a high opinion of himself, a loyal hound, and an endearingly self-deprecating pug.

“These are the people in our lives with complicated dispositions and attitudes who never fail to bring
us joy, even when they’re jerks,” Zupa explained in an artist statement. “This new set of matchboxes is an effort to give the overly expressive, stubborn, supportive, unpredictable, confused and self important beings in our lives the recognition they deserve.”

Zupa used oil-based intaglio ink to create the three-color prints, and each one includes a pint-sized certificate of authenticity. The matchboxes can be ordered in the artist’s online shop, along with pre-orders for larger prints of the same designs. You can see more of Zupa’s vintage-inspired and humorous works, ranging from prints to paintings and sculptures, on Instagram.

 

 



Art

Glitched Sculptures of Greek Gods by Zachary Eastwood-Bloom Reimagine Classicism in the Digital Age

July 11, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“The Hidden One / Pluto” (2017), edition of 8, sterling silver, 19 x 12 x 14.5 cm. All images courtesy of the artist/Pangolin London. Photography: Steve Russell

Interdisciplinary artist Zachary Eastwood-Bloom brings old and new together in his glitched classical sculptures. The Glasgow-based artist uses cutting edge digital technology to explore age-old art motifs through a contemporary lens. Eastwood-Bloom’s Greek god series was created during his time as the Pangolin Bronze Foundry Artist in Residence. The series is inspired by the gods whose namesakes are our solar system’s planets, as well as particle physics. In an interview with Chrom Art Magazine, the artist explains his thought process:

I find it fascinating how people think. I think through making sculpture; through three-dimensional form, material, shape and surface. Other people think through numbers, words, sounds, movement, digital code etcetera. I am interested in working with people who think via different modes to me. In the digital age is that a lot of people work using digital technology now. This means that their digital information can be changed into different mediums; words can become sound, sound can become form for example.

In addition to his time at Pangolin, Eastwood-Bloom has exhibited at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum and The Royal Academy of Arts, and he is currently the artist in residence at the Scottish Ballet. Explore more of Eastwood-Bloom’s wide-ranging practice on his website and Instagram.

Kronos / Saturn Cast Bronze 2017 Edition of 3 80 x 70 x 40cm

“Cloud Gatherer / Jupiter” (2017), edition of 5, cast bronze, 74 x 40 x 30 cm.

“MSNGR / Mercury” (2017), edition of 8, sterling silver, 19 x 14 x 14 cm

“Venus Celestis” (2017), edition of 3, marble, 80 x 58 x 40 cm.

“Earth Shaker / Neptune” (2017), edition of 5, cast bronze, 39 x 39 x 27 cm

 

 



Design

Beekeeping Made Easy With a New Compact Hive Built for Urban Settings

July 10, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Gone are the days of full coverage beekeeping suits and padded gloves with the invention of a radical new hive by Italian company Beeing, which was founded by a third-generation bee keeper. B-box is the very first system designed for homes and urban environments, with a small footprint that can fit on even the tiniest of balconies or backyards. Not only does the simplified hive makes raising bees and harvesting honey easy for novices, it benefits the bees as well. A seven-foot-tall chimney ensures that bees remain out of range when coming in and out of the hive, while uniquely designed chambers present only small sections of the honeycomb so users are not disturbing or impacting the health of the hive by extracting a large sheet.

With 80% of the world’s food supply needing the help of bees, coupled with major threats to a declining bee population, it is more crucial than ever that solutions to this crisis are discovered and put into action. You can learn more about B-box in the video below, and contribute to their campaign by visiting IndieGoGo. (via designboom)

 

 



Art Craft

Radial Circles Embroidered Atop Vintage Photographs Act as Multi-Faceted Color Swatches

July 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Striped circles hover over vintage scenes of natural and built landscapes in embroidered interventions by Natalie Ciccoricco. Using colored threads that perfectly match the tones of the underlying images, Ciccoricco builds radial circles that act as multi-faceted color swatches. Each circle contains more than a dozen different hues of embroidery thread to pick up the nuanced colors present in the vintage images. In one photograph of a desert, the embroidered lines connect to light green cacti, blue sky, and a brown mountain. In another, the varied blue hues of water consume most of the image—and its corresponding circle—while thin black lines pick up the reflection of a boat’s hull.

Ciccoricco, who is Dutch and based in California, is represented by Zukowski Collective. When she is not crafting her embroidered images, she works as a freelance graphic designer and software language translation consultant. The artist shares her work on Instagram, and offers original artwork in her online store as well as some items on Society6.

 

 

 

 

 



Animation Music

Kids Across North America Colored Over 3,000 Frames to Illustrate an Animated Music Video

July 10, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

An animated music video for Meg Myers’ cover of a Kate Bush song brings kid’s coloring books to life. Director Jo Roy first filmed Myers on a green screen, performing the crawling, climbing, and flying shown in the music video (see behind-the-scenes below). Then, each of the 3,202 frames was printed off as a black and white coloring book page. Elementary school-aged children from ten schools and an art program in the U.S. and Canada colored the pages however they wanted, with a provided crayon color palette.

Over 2,100 kids contributed to the resulting animation, which features Myers exploring the universe as a metamorphosing moth. Within the provided black contour lines, scribbled-in tulips and imaginatively shaded planets form the backdrop for the singer’s winged journey. You can see more of Roy’s directorial and dance work on her website, and listen to Meg Myers on Soundcloud. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Design

Hypnotic New Garments by Iris van Herpen Blur the Boundaries of Art, Science, and Fashion

July 9, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Like many of her haute couture peers, fashion designer Iris van Herpen (previously) selects a theme that inspires and unites the designs in each of her collections. Van Herpen, who has interdisciplinary interests in fine art and science, is particularly known for her wide-reaching collaborations. For her latest body of work, titled ‘Hypnosis,’ the Dutch designer partnered with Anthony Howe (previously), an American sculptor who specializes in large-scale kinetic works.

The resulting collection is centered around Howe’s Omniverse sculpture. With rotating circles of varying sizes spiraling out from a central arc, Omniverse “explores our relationship with nature and intertwines with infinite expansion and contraction, expressing a universal life cycle,” according to a statement on van Herpen’s website. The designer used feathers, silk, aluminum, stainless steel, organza, ball bearings, and satin in labor-intensive processes to form the ethereal dresses worn by runway models who passed through and around Howe’e sculpture.

“The ‘Hypnosis’ collection is a hypnotic visualization of nature’s tapestry, the symbiotic cycles of our biosphere that interweave the air, land, and oceans. It also reflects the ongoing dissection of the rhythms of life and resonates with the fragility within these interwoven worlds” van Herpen explains.

You can read more about the intricate techniques used to create the garments—including one developed in collaboration with Canada-based Professor of Architecture Philip Beesley—on the designer’s website. Van Herpen also released a behind-the-scenes short documentary that takes viewers inside her atelier, which is embedded below. Explore more of van Herpen’s mesmerizing creations on Instagram. (via Hi-Fructose)

 

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Art

Stumble Upon Seven New Reclaimed Wood Trolls by Thomas Dambo in the Forests of Boom, Belgium

July 9, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

In anticipation of Tomorrowland’s 15th anniversary, the Belgium-based festival commissioned Danish artist Thomas Dambo (previously) to build seven of his world-renowned trolls throughout the De Schoore area in Boom. Like his previous installations in Copenhagen, South Korea, and northern Illinois, the new cast of creatures are built from recycled and reclaimed wood from pallets, buildings, and fallen trees. Carved wood forms geometric noses and human-sized feet, while scraggly tree branches create untamed hair and beards.

“Trash is a material and it only depends on how you work with it,” Dambo explained in a press release about the project. “We can design an entire world out of trash. We need to look at it and then think about what to do with it. That’s why I’m building these bigger-than-life scale projects. By doing that and involving people, they will open their eyes and see the possibilities and opportunities that lay in our trash. I hope that my art will inspire people to recycle and encourage them to be kind to nature and our planet.”

Although the trolls were built for the festival, visitors to the De Schoore recreational area can also happen upon the 13 to 60-foot-tall sculptures, in addition to an observation tower built from found branches. Follow along with Dambo’s friendly beasts on his website and Facebook.