Art

Meditative Mixed-Media Paintings by Arghavan Khosravi Subtly Address Human Rights Issues

September 3, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Artist Arghavan Khosravi creates multi-part worlds in her carefully composed paintings. Contemporary human figures commingle with ghostly limbs and classical Greco-Roman sculptures. Bright red lines of string, Persian decorative motifs, and found textiles connect the disparate figures. The artist begins each painting with an intensive brainstorming and research phase, which results in a detailed sketch that outlines about 85% of the completed work.

“Before I start a new painting, I keep thinking about what I want to say in it. It can have a specific narrative or just convey a mood or feeling—it mostly reflects on a memory, life event or something I have recently read,” Khosravi explains. “While I have this general idea/theme in my mind, I go through a lot of source images and put aside those that trigger something in my mind. I juxtapose those images to come up with the main visual structure and composition.”

One of Khosravi’s main sources of inspiration is societal issues in Iran: “Human rights and, more specifically, women’s rights issues, patriarchy, and some levels of gender apartheid. I am more interested in addressing these concerns in a symbolic and subtler way and have an indirect approach.” She also studies and incorporates art historical traditions, ranging from Persian miniature painting and Islamic architecture to medieval painting and ancient sculpture.

The artist shares with Colossal that she began to take art seriously at the early age of 12, but felt pressure to pursue a more practical career like engineering. She pivoted slightly with a commercial creative career: after studying graphic design in college, Khosravi worked in the field for almost a decade, while also earning a Master’s in Fine Arts in illustration, and illustrating nearly two dozen children’s books. Last year, Khosravi achieved her dream of becoming a painter and completed her Master’s in Fine Arts in painting at the Rhode Island School of Design.

Khosravi has most recently exhibited in a group show at the Museum of Contemporary Art Yinchuan in China, and in SPRING/BREAK, a part of New York’s Armory week. You can see more of her detailed, multi-layered paintings on Instagram. (via Booooooom)

work in progress

work in progress

work in progress

 

 



Art

New Solo Exhibition by Seth Globepainter Fills a Historic Chateau in Bordeaux, France

September 1, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Collaboration with Pascal Vilcollet

French artist Julien Malland, aka Seth Globepainter (previously), has spent the summer exhibiting a large body of work inside and outside of the Institut Culturel Bernard Magrez. Located in Bordeaux, France, the historic chateau was built in the 18th century and now doubles as a cultural center. Malland’s takeover includes dozens of paintings, installations, and sculptures that have transformed the castle into a colorful record of his travels and a look into his mind.

Titled 1,2,3, Soleil, the exhibition features over 50 of the artist’s faceless characters. Each room in the chateau has a theme that represents one of Malland’s previous projects in countries around the world. Vibrant colors and geometrical shapes are complicated by themes of conflict and loneliness. The exhibition includes site-specific installations as well as collaborative pieces made with artists Mono Gonzalez and Pascal Vilcollet.

The walk through Malland’s world will remain on view in France through October 7, 2019. In addition to his solo show, Malland also recently completed two murals in Denmark as part of Kirk Gallery‘s annual Out in the Open mural initiative. To keep up with the artist’s latest projects, follow him on Instagram.

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

© Julien-Malland

© Julien-Malland

© Julien-Malland

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

© Constant-Formé—Becherat

© Constant-Formé-Becherat

Seth | ‘The Phoenix’ | Østerbro 22 | Aalborg (Photo: Seth)

Seth | ‘Jack in the Box’ | Østerbro 41 | Aalborg | Denmark

 

 



Art

Tiny Metal Plants, Animals, and Buildings are Liberated From Coins by Artist Micah Adams

August 31, 2019

Andrew LaSane

Toronto-based artist Micah Adams uses a jeweler’s saw to cut out the embossed animals, figures, and objects from coins of different sizes and denominations. The metal cut-outs are used to create tiny readymades and fun collages. From a growing pile of copper leaves taken from Canadian pennies, to intricate birds and flowers borrowed from foreign currency, each of Micah Adams works are hand cut using the same basic tool. Working at a smaller scale is something that the artist came to in art college while making sculptures and spending his free time in the jewelry and metal smithing department. The practice of cutting coins evolved out of using other materials.

“I was making small assemblages from things I’d collected over the years, tiny things like toys, bottle caps, beach finds and even teeth,” Adams tells Colossal. “Then I cast them in metal. They were like tiny bronzes or miniature monuments. That lead me to look for tiny things that were already metal that I could use. So I looked at coins and their designs for things I could cut-out.”

Micah Adams is currently working on another solo exhibition of his coin collages and other works which will open at MKG127 in Toronto in February 2020. He also has an Etsy shop where he sells earrings, tie tacks, and other keepsakes. For future updates and to see more of his art, follow Adams on Instagram.

 

 



Animation Science

Take a Deep Dive Into the Relative Scale of Atoms Through the Tip of a Ballpoint Pen

August 30, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

The Super Zoom is a new computer-generated animation that shows how everything in the universe is made of minuscule foundational elements. The 3 minute-long short grounds itself with a relatable starting point: a ballpoint pen and ruled paper. On the lower right side of the screen, a scale adjusts as the “camera” zooms further and further in, breaking through the pen tip’s metal surface into more and more minute layers. The Super Zoom was created by Pedro Machado, a computer graphics designer who is based in Brazil. You can watch more of Machado’s videos on Vimeo.

 

 



Art Photography

Fantastical Photographs of Opulently Dressed Models in Castles and Mansions

August 30, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“Swan Lake” (2014), all images © Natalie Lennard

Photographer Natalie Lennard, who works as Miss Aniela, creates lavish scenes centered around elegantly dressed models. While each image might seem, at first glance, like a straightforward luxury fashion shoot, further inspection reveals surreal details. A canary yellow tulle gown morphs into birds, and ocean water splashes out of a painting frame.

Miss Aniela’s fantastical scenes are created using a combination of on-site shoots with practical effects, along with extensive post-production and even bespoke C.G.I. (as for the 20,000 fish forming the dress worn by a deep sea diver model in “She Shoal”). The photographer explains that all images are shot on location with the model posed and lit in-frame. “Sometimes I do not know whether the image will be largely ‘raw’ and not require overt surrealism added,” Aniela shares, “until I go through the process to feel what is right for each piece.”

The U.K.-based artist has been working as a fine art photographer for 13 years, getting her start with self-portraits as a university student. In some works, she incorporates direct references to paintings from the art historical canon. Aniela has been working in her current style since 2011, and shares with Colossal that she has noticed a rising interest in her work from art collectors, as the lines between fine art and fashion are increasingly blurred.

You can explore more of Miss Aniela’s immersive worlds on Instagram, and go behind the scenes of production in her explanatory blog posts. Fine art prints are available via Saatchi Art.

“What He Bequeathed” (2016)

“She Shoal” (2019)

“Poster & Plumage” (2016)

“Enter the Golden Dragon” (2018)

“Thawed Fortress” (2015)

“Gilt” (2016)

“Scarlet Song” (2013)

“Away with the Canaries” (2013)

“Pokerface” (2015)

 

 



Art Photography

South African Flowers Frozen into Fleeting Arrangements

August 29, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

South African photographers Bruce Boyd and Tharien Smith have spent the last two years photographing clusters of brightly colored flowers trapped in blocks of ice. The temporary sculptures are captured underwater, where the ice begins to crack and add further dimension to the floral compositions.

Flowers are sourced from Cape Town’s gardens, hedges, and trees, which are then placed in plastic containers and frozen for three nights. At dawn, Boyd and Smith take the capsules to the nearest stream or pool to begin their photoshoot. “Very few of the frozen arrangements come out perfectly,” explains Boyd to Colossal. “Mostly bubbles form that obscure the flowers, or the flowers drift from their set positions. We have learned to accept the imperfections, and even make it part of our work.”

You can see more of their arrangements on their project website Zero Degrees, in addition to Facebook, and Instagram. Boyd and Smith also offer fine art prints of their frozen flowers. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Art History

400 Artists, 54 Countries, 500 Years: ‘Great Women Artists’ is the Largest Collection of Female Artists Ever Published

August 29, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Great Women Artists celebrates the centuries-long lineage of artistic brilliance amongst artists who happen to be female. Featuring a vast array of aesthetics and movements spanning 500 years, included artists range from Nina Chanel Abney and Eva Hesse to Shoplifter and Sofonisba Anguissola. The 464-page book from Phaidon is the largest compilation of female artists ever published, with 450 illustrations of 400 artists from more than 50 countries. Great Women Artists will be released on September 25, 2019, and is currently available for preorder on Amazon and Phaidon’s website.

 

 

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