Opportunities

January 2023 Opportunities: Open Calls, Residencies, and Grants for Artists

January 3, 2023

Colossal

Every month, Colossal shares a selection of opportunities for artists and designers, including open calls, grants, fellowships, and residencies. If you’d like to list an opportunity here, please get in touch at [email protected]. You can also join our monthly Opportunities Newsletter.

 

Open Calls

Aperture Portfolio Prize (International)
This annual international competition is designed to discover, exhibit, and publish new talents in photography. The first prize winner receives $3,000, an exhibition in New York, and publishing in Aperture magazine.
Deadline: January 6, 2023.

PHDC Request for Proposals at Festival Pier, Philadelphia (International)
PHDC is seeking a proposal for a public artwork for Festival Pier, at Spring Garden Street and Columbus Boulevard, with a budget of $1,100,000. Five finalists will develop and present their proposals and receive a $3,500 honorarium before one project is chosen for commission.
Deadline: 3 p.m. EST January 10, 2023.

Passepartout Photo Prize (International)
The Passepartout juried contest will award one photographer 500 Euros, exhibition participation, publication in a catalog, and promotion opportunities. This year’s prize also includes three additional awarding categories and has an entry fee of 25 Euros.
Deadline: January 15, 2023.

Wisconsin Academy of Sciences, Arts & Letters Call for Artists (Wisconsin)
Artists and curators living in Wisconsin are encouraged to submit proposals for an exhibition at the Overture Center for the Arts in Madison. There is a $5 application fee.
Deadline: 5 p.m. CST on March 1, 2023.

World of WearableArt 2023 Competition (International)
Entries are open for the World of WearableArt Awards Competition, which brings the work of international designers to life each year in a large-scale theatrical spectacle held in Wellington, New Zealand. As well as a total prize pool of over $185,000 (NZD), the competition offers the chance to access exclusive residencies and internships with global creative companies.
Deadline: March 2, 2023.

 

Grants

Gottlieb Foundation Individual Support Grant (International)
This grant is open to painters, sculptors, and printmakers working for at least 20 years with current financial needs.
Deadline: January 18, 2023.

Barnard Library Research Awards (International)
Two artists, scholars, writers, and other researchers will gain access to the Barnard Archives and Zine Library for a project that support access, equity, inclusion, and social justice. The award comes with $3,000 to support research.
Deadline: February 1, 2023.

National Endowment for the Arts Grants for Arts Projects (U.S.)
Applications are open for the NEA’s largest granting program, which offers $10,000 to $100,000 awards to projects from visual arts organizations.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. EST on February 9, 2023.

Adobe Creative Residency Community Fund (Ukraine or refugee)
Adobe’s Creative Residency Community Fund commissions visual artists to create company projects on a rolling basis. Awardees will receive between $500 and $5,000.
Deadline: Rolling.

 

Residencies & Fellowships

OSUN Center for Human Rights & the Arts Fellowships (International)
Scholars and artists with teaching experience and a research project are eligible to apply for this one-year fellowship in human rights and the arts at Bard College. Two fellows will receive a $65,000 salary, health benefits, and a research budget.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. EST on January 5, 2023.

AnkhLave Garden Project Fellowship (New York City)
Five BIPOC artists will be commissioned to create site-specific works in a public space and a traditional gallery. Artists receive a $1,000 honorarium and can be reimbursed up to $1,000 for other expenses. One artist will also be granted $10,000 to create an original treehouse.
Deadline: January 6, 2023.

*This Is Not A Drill* Community Fellowship  (New York City)
*This Is Not A Drill* is seeking socially-engaged artists, scholars, and arts workers who are interested in the intersection of art, technology, equity, and the climate emergency. Chosen applicants will receive access to NYU facilities, resources, and support, a $3,000 stipend, and a fall exhibition.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. EST on January 19, 2023.

Joshua Tree Highlands Artist Residency (International)
Open across disciplines, this residency offers a $1,000 stipend and space to work for a seven-week residency. There is a $45 application fee.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. MST on January 10, 2023.

Good Hart Artist Residency (International)
This residency offers 10 to 21-day stays to visual artists, writers, and composers at any stage of their careers. Each artist receives lodging, a $500 stipend, and food.
Deadline: January 11, 2023.

Hayama Artist Residency (International)
The residency offers two visual artists roundtrip flights to Japan, shared accommodations, and a weekly $200 stipend for meals and transportation. There is a $95 application fee.
Deadline: January 15, 2023.

Anderson Center Residency Program (International)
The Anderson Center offers multiple residency opportunities, for all early-career and emerging artists living in Minnesota or New York City. Most include stipends and lodging.
Deadline: Noon CST on January 16, 2023.

Solitary Artist Retreat in the Desert  (International)
This two-week solitary retreat in the Nevada desert is for artists focused on environmental awareness. There is a $20 application fee, but there is no cost for this program. Artists must cover travel and living expenses.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. EST on January 22, 2023.

Künstlerhaus Büchsenhausen Fellowship Program for Art and Theory (International)
Visual and media artists, art critics, theorists, and curators are eligible for this five-month fellowship. One chosen fellow will receive 4,000 Euros, a studio for working and living, a production budget, and money to invite experts to Büchsenhausen for professional exchange.
Deadline: January 29, 2023.

Sharpe-Walentas Studio Program (U.S.)
This program awards rent-free non-living studio space to 17 visual artists for year-long residencies in DUMBO, Brooklyn.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. EST on January 31, 2023.

Residency Unlimited’s Artist Residency Program (New York City)
Open to artists who identify as Black, Indigenous, and people of color, this program focuses on research-based practices that explore gaps in historical knowledge. The residency will run from April 3 to June 30, 2023, and comes with a $3,300 stipend and $500 for production support.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. EST on January 31, 2023.

Fine Arts Work Center Visual Artist Fellowship (International)
This seven-month residency offers 10 artists an apartment, a studio, a $1,250 monthly stipend, and $1,000 for relocation at the end of the program. There is a $65 application fee.
Deadline: February 1, 2023.

StudioWorks Artist Residency (International)
Visual artists and crafters are eligible for this four-week residency that offers a $2,000 stipend and workspace.
Deadline: February 1, 2023.

Glen Arbor Arts Center’s Artist-in-Residence (International)
Applications are open to artists working in multiple disciplines for this two-week residency. Studio space and lodging are provided, and there’s a $35 application fee.
Deadline: February 2, 2023.

MacDowell Fellowship (International)
MacDowell grants about 300 fellowships with studio space, meals, and lodgings across disciplines. The application fee is $30.
Deadline: February 10, 2023.

Ucross Foundation Residencies and Fellowships (International)
Ucross has two programs open across disciplines: a general studio residency and Ford Family Foundation Fellowships open to Oregon artists only. Chosen applicants receive studio space, living accommodations, and a $1,000 stipend. There is a $40 application fee.
Deadline: 11:59 p.m. MST on March 1, 2023.

Etant Donnés Curatorial Fellowship (U.S.)
Open to U.S.-based curators interested in researching the French art scene, these fellowships offer research opportunities and a $3,000 stipend.
Deadline: Rolling.

 

 

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Craft Design

Mila Textiles Reimagines the Balaclava in Vibrant Beadwork and Embroidered Visages

January 3, 2023

Kate Mothes

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

All images © Mila Textiles, shared with permission

Masks have long been associated with myriad cultural functions from ceremonial rites and dramatic performances to defense and protection from disease or inclement weather. For London-based designer Kamila, who works under the name Mila Textiles, ski masks—also known as balaclavas—provide a fitting canvas for elaborately embroidered, wearable compositions.

A 19th century military staple, balaclavas saw a sartorial rise in 2021. The practical knitwear item takes its name from the Ukrainian port town of Balaclava, a key battle site during the Crimean War of 1854, and in the 20th century, the garment became a trope in movies and television depicting burglaries and heists. Kamila’s colorful reinterpretation of the mask relaxes these associations. “I want my work to make my audience feel happy, forget about their stresses for a bit, and chill,” she tells Colossal.

Kamila draws inspiration from her local environment, sharing that “living in London means I am constantly surrounded by events, museums, and galleries where I can take pictures of anything that gives me creative ideas.” The vibrant hues and textures of coral and marine life are another influence, especially in the context of cartoons. “I try to include creatures in my designs because this brings comfort to me, almost as cartoons would,” she says. Bright colors are paired with beads and layers of thread to produce playful patterns around the wearer’s eyes.

In addition to balaclavas, Mila Textiles produces meticulously embellished bags and pouches featuring faux fur and patterned fabrics. New items are listed in the shop on her website, and you can follow more of her work on Instagram.

 

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

Two photos of an individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

An individual wearing a balaclava embellished with beads and embroidery.

A detail of beadwork and embroidery.

 

 



Design Science

Boldly Contrasted Maps by Spencer Schien Visualize Population Density Data

January 2, 2023

Kate Mothes

A 3D population density map of Illinois.

All images © Spencer Shien, shared with permission

It’s one thing to know that Chicago is the third largest city in the United States or that the fastest growing metropolitan areas are in the West and the South, but how can we see it? Data technologist Spencer Schien answers that question with an ongoing series of population density maps of states, rivers, and coastlines. In his work with nonprofits and NGOs, he uses R programming language to generate data visualizations that help organizations target where their services are most needed.

To compile the maps, Schien digs into the Kontur Population dataset, a publicly accessible project that layers global population numbers derived from sources like the Global Human Settlement Layer—a tool for assessing the presence of people on the planet—along with Microsoft’s Building Footprints and Facebook. He then translates statistical information about specific regions into highly contrasted maps utilizing Rayshader. The more densely populated an area is, the higher the bars rise. Atlanta, for example, is more than 137 square miles with around 4,200 people per square mile, and the map illustrates this as a mass of red amidst surroundings of more rural areas in green.

Currently based in Milwaukee where he works as the Senior Manager of Data & Analytics for City Forward Collective, Schien focuses on building the maps and other statistical visualizations using open-source tools that help to alleviate financial barriers to information. You can find more of his work on his website.

 

A 3D population density map of Ohio.

A 3D population density map of Kansas.

A 3D population density map of Wisconsin.

A 3D population density map of Virginia.

A detail of a 3D population density map of Virginia.

A 3D population density map of Pennsylvania.   A detail of a 3D population density map of Pennsylvania.

A 3D population density map of Georgia.

A 3D population density map of the Mississippi River.

A detail of a 3D population density map of the Mississippi River.

 

 



Art

A Series of Meticulously Carved Panels Combine Layers of Color to Make Tugboat Printshop’s ‘River’ Woodcut

December 30, 2022

Kate Mothes

An intricate woodblock carving of a river running through a forested landscape.

All images © Tugboat Printshop

Woodland creatures peek out from behind tree trunks, and a stream of water rushes through a dense, forested landscape in Valerie Lueth’s latest woodcut for Tugboat Printshop (previously). “River” uses four intricately carved panels layered into a composition of overlapping, vivid color. Currently a work in progress and nearing completion, the detailed scene features intricate foliage and a smattering of stars throughout the sky and landscape.

To create the nocturnal setting, Lueth began by meticulously carving the surface of a “key block” using knives and gouging tools to create an overview of the entire composition. She then transferred the full scene to three additional panels in gray ink and filled in sections with marker to delineate which areas should be carved and where different pigments would be applied. Printed in succession, each block will provide a puzzle-like piece of the final print.

“River” is available for pre-order on the Tugboat Printshop website, and you can follow more updates on Instagram.

 

An intricate woodblock carving of a river running through a forested landscape.

Two process images of making an intricate woodblock carving of a river running through a forested landscape.

An intricate woodblock carving of a river running through a forested landscape.

 

An intricate woodblock carving of a river running through a forested landscape.

An intricate woodblock carving of a river running through a forested landscape.

An intricate woodblock carving of a river running through a forested landscape.

 

 



Animation Art Science

‘aBiogenesis’ Reimagines the Primordial Soup Theory in a Mesmerizing Animation by Markos Kay

December 29, 2022

Kate Mothes

In an ethereal animation by London-based CGI artist Markos Kay, a mysterious world is in the process of forming. “aBiogenesis” reimagines the origin of life in a mesmerizing rendering of the lipid world hypothesis—a theory suggesting that the first self-replicating, cell-like objects were composed of a kind of fatty acid that could not dissolve in water. The hypothesis postulates that lipids may have formed into generative bilayers in the oceans. “These bilayers would have acted like tiny bubbles or bags, enclosing and protecting the chemical reactions that would eventually give rise to life,” he says.

Kay has focused on the intersection of art and science in his practice, utilizing digital tools to visualize biological or primordial phenomena. “aBiogenesis” focuses a microscopic lens on imagined protocells, vesicles, and primordial foam that twists and oscillates in various forms.

The artist has prints available for sale in his shop, and you can find more work on his website and Behance.

 

An artistic digital rendering of "primordial soup" or foamy particles that are hypothesized to be the origin of life.

All images © Markos Kay

Artistic digital renderings of "primordial soup" or foamy particles that are hypothesized to be the origin of life.

An artistic digital rendering of "primordial soup" or foamy particles that are hypothesized to be the origin of life.

Artistic digital renderings of "primordial soup" or foamy particles that are hypothesized to be the origin of life.  An artistic digital rendering of "primordial soup" or foamy particles that are hypothesized to be the origin of life.

 

 



Art

Embodying Vibrance and Joy, Gio Swaby’s Patterned Portraits Celebrate Blackness and Womanhood

December 28, 2022

Kate Mothes

A silhouette made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

“New Growth Second Chapter 11” (2021), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 16 x 20 inches. All images © Gio Swaby, shared with permission courtesy of Claire Oliver Gallery

In Bahamian artist Gio Swaby’s colorful sewn portraits, an invisible yet integral thread comes in the form of an invitation to celebrate Blackness and womanhood. Through the language of textiles and pattern, her practice centers on accessibility and facilitating connection with the viewer. “I think about people like me and how I didn’t get into art or museums or anything until I was 19,” she tells Colossal, sharing that the historical exclusion of Blackness in art motivates her to make pieces that reflect individuality and joy in a mirror-like way.

The Toronto-based artist began working with sewing and textiles around ten years ago, and her use of the medium acknowledges the intersection of traditional craft and fine art, viewed through the lens of personal relationships. “My mother was a seamstress,” she says. “I grew up in that world, but I didn’t come back to it as an art medium until around 2013. I associated it with a special love between us, and I wanted to share that with the viewer, too.”

 

A portrait made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

“Seated Figure” (2022), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 55 x 66 x 1 inches

Sharing in connection and conversation is central to Swaby’s process, which involves sitting down with her subjects prior to beginning each piece. Most of the portraits represent women in her immediate circle of family and friends. “I already have a sense of who they are, but I learn more about them, and they learn more about me,” she says. The conversations lead to the selection of fabrics, which the artist chooses based on the individuals’ stories and personalities, with an emphasis on exuberant hues and bold designs. In self-portraits, she considers family histories and memories. She says, “I picked out a hummingbird print for my dad because I heard a story that when he was a kid, he was the only one in the neighborhood who could run fast enough to catch a hummingbird.”

In her larger portraits, Swaby incorporates sewing directly onto canvas as a drawing tool, outlining the contours of faces, hands, and hair. Loose threads dangle from the surfaces, suggesting the reverse—typically unseen—side of embroidery and the individuals’ sense of self being perpetually in progress. The titles of her concurrent, ongoing series imply dualities and connections. In New Growth, vibrant silhouettes celebrate Black hair while also alluding to a person who is thriving; Love Letter references a sentiment passed from one person to another—or perhaps even to oneself; and Another Side To Me recognizes the innumerable, intersecting facets of every identity.

Recently exhibited at the Museum of Fine Arts in St. Petersburg, Florida, Swaby’s solo exhibition Fresh Up travels to the Art Institute of Chicago and will open on April 8. Find more of her work at Claire Oliver Gallery, on her website, and follow updates on Instagram.

 

A silhouette made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

“New Growth Second Chapter 8” (2021), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

A portrait made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

“Another Side To Me Second Chapter 3” (2021), cotton fabric and thread sewn on muslin, 28 x 36 inches

Two silhouettes made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

Left: “New Growth Second Chapter 10” (2021), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 16 x 20 inches. Right: “New Growth Second Chapter 9” (2021), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

A silhouette made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

“New Growth Second Chapter 7” (2021), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 16 x 20 inches

Two portraits made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral patterned background.

Left: “Love Letter 10” (2021), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 38 x 84 inches. Right: “Love Letter 5” (2021), thread and fabric sewn on canvas, 38 x 84 inches

A portrait made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

“Seeing You Through Her and Me: Carissa” (2022), cotton fabric and thread sewn onto canvas, 62 x 78 x 2 inches

A portrait made from colorful, patterned fabric sewn on to a neutral canvas background.

“Another Side To Me Second Chapter 5” (2021), cotton fabric and thread sewn on muslin, 28 x 36 inches