Art

Glow-in-the-Dark Installation Invites Guests to Make Momentary Impressions on a Vast Color-Changing Landscape

July 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Dutch artist and designer Daan Roosegaarde (previously) has created an interactive phosphorescent landscape that highlights the mark of each visitor’s touch. The installation, titled PRESENCE, is the artist’s first solo exhibition at a museum and fills several rooms with interactive glow-in-the-dark concepts. Guests can capture their shadows as they are bathed in green and red light, dig their hands into thousands of glowing orbs, or trace neon light patterns across the museum floor. The installation was created as a metaphor for the impact of humans’ presence on Earth, which displays the multitude of ways we leave our impression behind.

“I wanted to create a place where you feel connected,” Roosegaarde explained in a statement about the exhibition. “You make the artwork and the artwork makes you. PRESENCE shows your relationship with the environment and how we can influence it.”

PRESENCE runs through January 12, 2020 at the Groninger Museum in the Netherlands. You can view more pieces of the installation in action in the video below, and more experiential projects from Studio Roosegaarde on their website and Instagram. (via Colossal Submissions)

 

 



Illustration

Deep Ocean Waters Amplify Emotions in Sonia Alins’ Evocative Mixed Media Illustrations

July 25, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

“The swimmers III. The gathering”

Illustrator Sonia Alins (previously) creates evocative aquatic scenes using a combination of two and three dimensional elements. Smooth, translucent vellum creates the visual effect of water, and Alins sometimes inserts tufts of colored thread or small sheets of tulle to invoke the ocean floor’s textural topography. Alins then creates carefully placed slits in the vellum to allow her figurative illustrations to peek through the water. Swimming women and the occasional whale move through the murky water, with expressions ranging from peacefulness to mild distress. In an interview with Sara Barnes, Alins explained her deep connection to the water:

I was born near the Mediterranean sea and the influence of it and water in my culture is something defining. I guess it’s part of my DNA. The truth is that the sea has always been present in my life and has transmitted a special and positive energy to me. When taking the first steps of my Dones d’aigua series, water came to me as the perfect medium to communicate and expand emotion. The protagonists of my works interact with this mass of water where they are immersed and, there, their feelings are amplified, their shouts are heard louder, their desperation is felt more profoundly… But also, when they are calm, it feels like a more rewarding emotion too.

The Spain-based artist’s minimal yet impactful style lends itself to literary and editorial illustrations, and Alins has received several advertising and book awards for her work. You can explore more of Alins’ aquatic worlds on Instagram and Behance, and shop prints and products in her Society6 store.

“What I learnt from whales” series

“Dones d’aigua III” series

“The Swimmers”

“The Swimmers” (detail)

“What I learnt from whales” series

“Dones d’aigua III” series

 

 



Photography

Birds Hunt, Hide, and Blow Impressive Smoke Rings in a Selection of Images from the 2019 Audubon Photography Awards

July 25, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Red-winged Blackbird. Photo: Kathrin Swoboda/Audubon Photography Awards

The Audubon Photography Awards are celebrating their tenth year with an array of bird images that capture moments often missed by the human eye. In the contest’s grand prize winning photo, amateur photographer Kathrin Swoboda presents a red-winged blackbird emitting what appears to be perfect rings of smoke from its beak into the cold morning air. Another image by photographer Kevin Ebi catches an unbelievable rabbit theft in which a bald eagle struggles to steal dinner from an unsuspecting fox.

A new category revealed in this year’s contest is Plants for Birds, which honors Audubon’s Plants for Birds program. The category asked photographers to present unique depictions of birds alongside local plant life, as a way to addresses the importance of native plants to the survival of surrounding wildlife. This winner of the inaugural award was the San Diego-based photographer Michael Schulte who presented a hooded oriole gathering bits of palm fibers for a nest. You can see the rest of this year’s award winners on Audubon’s website.

Great Blue Herons. Photo: Melissa Rowell/Audubon Photography Awards

Bald Eagle and red fox. Photo: Kevin Ebi/Audubon Photography Awards

Horned Puffin (captive). Photo: Sebastian Velasquez/Audubon Photography Awards

Hooded Oriole on a California fan palm. Photo: Michael Schulte/Audubon Photography Awards

Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo: Elizabeth Boehm/Audubon Photography Awards

 

 



Art

Competing Points of View Find Unity in a Basketball Court Mural by AkaCorleone

July 24, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

Portuguese artist AkaCorleone recently repainted a public basketball court in Lisbon, Portugal to emphasize the unification of differing points of view. The mural, located in Campo dos Mártires da Pátria, covers a public 46 x 82 foot wide court in pink, yellow, and blue. Its figures—a woman holding the Earth and a bespectacled man—sit at opposing sides of the court much like the flipped profiles of Jack, Queen, or King playing cards. According to the artist’s statement the piece, titled “BALANCE,” is intended to demonstrate the coming together of separate forces, especially in the neighborhood and on the court.

“The search for a true balance, a perfect duality between two people, two teams, two sides, two realities, is hard to achieve, but it’s possible,” AkaCorleone explained. “The concept behind the art for this project was to play with the notion of duality, of two different points of view, two different sides that complement each other like to opposite versions of the same reality that can only be understood as one.”

If you are interested in sports-oriented murals, you might also like this technicolor basketball court created in collaboration between fashion brand Pigalle and design agency Ill-Studio, or the beautiful works produced in public parks by Project Backboard. You can find more of AkaCorleone’s outdoor murals and paintings on his website and Instagram. (via Street Art News)

     

 

 



Photography

Unusual Details Upend Brooke DiDonato’s Seemingly Straightforward Photographs

July 24, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Photographer Brooke DiDonato (previously) twists bodies into unusual shapes that lead the viewer’s eye in transfixing circles. The Brooklyn-based artist creates seemingly tranquil images with soft colors and soothing textures. But surreal details, like a pair of stilettos on the sidewalk that melt into a patent leather puddle, or a gender-bending figure seated on a bench, make each photograph an object of intrigue. DiDonato exhibits her work widely and most recently showed at Le Purgatoire in Paris. Stay up to date on the photographer’s eye-catching and thought-provoking work via Instagram.

 

 



Art

Spike-Covered Vessels by Ikuko Iwamoto Imitate the Irregular Shapes of Microorganisms

July 24, 2019

Kate Sierzputowski

London-based artist Ikuko Iwamoto gathers inspiration for her spike-covered vessels from microscopic sources, imitating the shape of the nearly invisible microorganisms that inhabit our bodies. To create the objects, Iwamoto first slip casts the body of the bowl. Next she drills dozens of holes into the surface of the vessel and fills them with double-ended clay spikes secured with slip. Their extreme texture comes from her interest in providing a physical investigation to her audience in addition to their visual presentation. In 2018 the artist initiated a project to create 100 vases over the next four years, approximately two a month. You can watch a demonstration of how she creates her ceramic bowls on YouTube, and purchase your own via her Etsy shop.

 

 



Illustration

Surprised Dandelions and Frustrated Erasers Come to Life in Delightful Illustrations by Sean Charmatz

July 23, 2019

Laura Staugaitis

Sean Charmatz anthropomorphizes everyday objects with universal emotions of surprise, frustration, and togetherness. By adding simple black lines to fruits, plants, and office supplies, Charmatz turns these otherwise unremarkable items into relatable characters. Though the California-based artist has gained quite a following for his one-off cartoonish “explorations”, he also has a long resume in Hollywood. Charmatz has worked on several Disney and Dreamworks films in addition to his previous roles as a storyboard artist and director for six years on SpongeBob SquarePants. You can follow along with his visual musings on Instagram, and watch his animated “Secret World of Stuff” compilations on YouTube.

 

 

 

 

 

A Colossal

Highlight

Sailing Ship Kite